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MW GUIDES Draft for GM Board Review (Co GMs)

   
MW GUIDES Draft for GM Board Review (Co GMs)

Hey guys, please take a peek and offer tips and tricks to help make this article better. Best if you are familiar with the MW GUIDES already as this will be an addition to them, specifically under the article http://www.myth-weavers.com/wiki/ind...nning_the_Game

Article Addition

Do I need a Co-GM Mentor?

Being a GM is a whole lot of work. It's not something that can be learned in a single sitting, and as you can tell from the size of the GM GUIDE in comparison to the other volumes, it is the biggest step forward one can take in their gaming career.

A Co-GM is someone who helps you with the game, and if acting as a mentor then... the short answer is: if it's your first time running a game, YES, you need a mentor. It is far better to have a Co-GM Mentor and not need them, than need them and not have them. You may also want one if it's your first time running a PBP game or if it's your first time running a new system.

Co-GM's don't necessarily serve as mentors though, some Co-GM's are used for inspiration, help with running the game or operating NPC's or any other myriad of assistance with GM duties.

At the end of the day though, having a buddy around to help while you are doing your trial run is a great resource.

To find a Co-GM mentor, first decide what system you are using and review all of the core material. If you don't at least look at the core material first you're going to have too many questions for a mentor to realistically train you. If you already have someone in mind, great! Look no further, but for the rest of us...

Once you review your core materials (as well as these guides) in full, then head over the GM Workshop and create a thread that states in the title that you are seeking a Co-GM to act as a mentor as well as indicating what system they are to be proficient in. Describe your gaming experience and your goals as well as any ideas you have that you'd like to bring to life with your game. Explain the kinds of things you are having trouble with. This will help prospective mentors be able to assist you.

Expect a Co-GM to be critical but fair. They are there to help guide you, and to do that effectively they may have to point out some flaws in your approach that you might not be aware of. It is wise not to take criticisms personally, however, because of this dynamic it's also important to choose a mentor that doesn't seem outright abrasive to you personally, otherwise it may effect the quality of your learning experience. While it's a lot of work to be a GM, it should still be fun, even while you're learning.

It is important to remember that while each mentor will vary in style and approach, they are there to guide and help you, not do all the grunt work and run the game for you. At the end of the day, It is your responsibility to ensure that your game is successful. A game is generally considered successful if it is either run to completion (for a one shot) or continues for over 3 months of game time (most games that expire early do so at 2.5 months).

Once you get through your first successful game as a GM on MW you may feel comfortable running by yourself or you may request your Co-GM to stay on with you for a myriad of reasons, but that's between you and them.

Running your first game can be a daunting task, even with a Co-GM to help you out with rules issues or suggestions for when you feel like you're coming to a rough spot. Instead of a full epic campaign, it could be easier to start off with a one-shot, being a game with a single defined goal that is reachable by players over the course of story covering the equivalent length of a weekly 30 minute long television sitcom (or as much as a pilot episode) rather than say, a two hour movie. The logic being, one-shots are easier to construct and less risk is involved by both the players and the GM should the game fail, thus making it easier to attract players for you. Further, one-shots have a defined beginning, middle and end, unlike a sandbox style game which is best reserved for very experienced DMs and players.

Even when you are an experienced DM you may find it's time to return to the GM Workshop with other topics and questions that perplex you. Don't be shy! That's what the GM workshop was made for! ...and more often than not, plenty of experienced GMs will be more than happy to assist you with any suggestions they might have, whether it's a quick rules question and answer, or perhaps some creative critique, or perhaps even understanding physical laws better. All of these topics and more are the kinds of discussions you'll find at the GM workshop.

Over time with several successful games under your belt you too may even feel ready to mentor others and help spread the joy of gaming by helping others become GMs.

25 views and not one critique? I suppose this must be absolutely perfect? ~

I don't see anything wrong at first glance... Still digesting...

I was not aware that the GM Workshop was the place to look for a Co-GM. Is that an established guideline, or how such things have worked out in the past, or a new thing?

I'm not entirely sure about...
Quote:
For your first game a one-shot is suggested, being a game with a single defined goal that is reachable by players over the course of story covering the equivalent length of a weekly 30 minute long television sitcom (or as much as a pilot episode) rather than say, a two hour movie.
It's not bad advice, for sure. But it seems like it could put off a DM who wants to run something that is not a one-shot.

Maybe something like...
Quote:
Running your first game can be a daunting task, even with a Co-GM to help you out with rules issues or suggestions for when you feel like you're coming to a dead end. Instead of a full campaign, it could be easier to start off with a one-shot etc.
...that may be no better. I don't know.

Thatdoes have a more positive tone while saying the same thing. Also, beingthat people have been dropping requests for tutors in here lately, as well as the mission of the place to help gm's learn, it does seem to be the natural way of things. Barring any better solution it seems like the best place to get a tutor anyhow. As others have saod the guides are great, but a tutor to help guide is a tool that can't be replaced fully by an essay. Really I think tutoring is just a natural fit for the gm worlshop.

Asking for a mentor/tutor should go in GM Workshop. Asking for a co-GM just to share GMing duties with no expectation of training should go in Game Planning or Games & Ads depending on the stage of preparation.

Yar that's what I was assuming. I will see to clarifying that a bit better by changing the wording to mentor and establishing that although they can be.the same, they aren't necessarily.

redrafted to denote changes.

Probably going to put this to print unless someone else has something to add.





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