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GURPS: Help with making GURPS Characters

   
it depends on how you want to fight. Judo is less about hitting your opponent and more about throwing him. Wrestling is more about physically slamming your opponent.

When you say psionics are you talking core rules psionics or sourcebook psionics? Personally I find the psionic sourcebook to be more use as a coaster than as a supplement, but that is because I don't agree with the author's math. it is also an overly complicated way of trying to create stadard sets of psionic abilities.

To make a psi, the first thing you will need is intelligence- almost any psionic ability will be based on intelligence and those that aren't inherantly can easilly be crowbared in. Which also brings up teh question of point level, because IQ is 20 points a level and [psionic] talent is 5 points a level, with a maximum of level 4 which I would strongly recomend taking.

After that teh question is what do you want to do with the psionics? There are so many ways to go it is hard to give good directions- injuring people? Manipulating them? Flying? Teleporting?

Silveroak, you hit the nail on the head. making a weak psion is realtively hard, figuring out the basics. Going up from there is daunting if your not sure which way your going.

Azar, The strength bonus is only for the grapple. I do however see a use for mixing the abilities. A wrestling grapple that turns into a Judo throw.

Wrestling - This skill represents training at grappling and pinning. Roll against the higher of DX or Wrestling to hit with a grapple, or to make or resist a takedown. Furthermore, if you know Wrestling at DX+1 level, add +1 to ST for the purpose of making or resisting any choke, grapple, neck snap, takedown, or pin, and whenever you attempt to break free. Add +2 to ST for Wrestling at DX+2 or better.
When you defend with bare hands, Wrestling allows you to parry once per turn. You must use both hands. Your Parry score is (skill/2) + 3, rounded down. This parry is at -3 vs. weapons. For complete rules for parrying barehanded, see Parrying Unarmed (p. 376).

Judo - This skill represents any advanced training at unarmed throws and grapples – not just the eponymous Japanese martial art.
Judo allows you to parry two different attacks per turn, one with each hand. Your Parry score is (skill/2) + 3, rounded down. This parry is not at the usual -3 for parrying a weapon barehanded, greatly reducing the likelihood of injury when you defend against an armed foe. In addition, Judo gives an improved retreating bonus when you parry; see Retreat
(p. 377). For complete rules for parrying barehanded, see Parrying Unarmed (p. 376).
On the turn immediately after a successful Judo parry, you may attempt to throw your attacker if he is within one yard. This counts as an attack; roll vs. Judo skill to hit. (Note that in an All-Out Attack, you cannot attempt two throws, but you can make one attempt at +4.) Your foe may use any active defense – he can parry your hand with a weapon! If his defense
fails, you throw him. When you throw a foe, he falls where you please. On a battle map, he lands in any two hexes near you. One of these hexes must be his starting hex, your hex, or any hex adjacent to one of those hexes. Your victim must roll against HT; a failed roll means he is stunned! If you throw him into someone else, that person must roll against the higher of ST+3 or DX+3 to avoid being knocked down. Finally, you may use your Judo skill instead of your DX for any DX roll made in close combat except to draw a weapon or drop a shield. If you grapple a foe using Judo, and he fails to break
free, you may make a Judo attack to throw him on your next turn, exactly as if you had parried his attack.
To use Judo, any hand with which you wish to parry or grapple must be empty. Because Judo relies heavily on footwork, all Judo rolls and Judo parries take a penalty equal to your encumbrance level. For instance, Heavy encumbrance would give you -3 to hit or to parry an enemy attack.

Karate - This skill represents any advanced training at unarmed striking, not just the Okinawan martial art of karate. Roll against Karate to hit with a punch (at no -4 for the “off” hand), or Karate-2 to hit with a kick. You cannot use Karate to attack with claws, teeth, etc., or with a blackjack – use Brawling (p. 182) for that. Karate skill does let you make several special attacks, however; see Special Unarmed Combat Techniques (p. 403).
Karate improves damage: if you know Karate at DX level, add +1 per die to basic thrust damage when you calculate damage with Karate attacks: punches, kicks, elbow strikes, etc. Add +2 per die if you know Karate at DX+1
or better! Work out damage ahead of time and record it on your character sheet.
Karate allows you to parry two different attacks per turn, one with each hand. Your Parry score is (skill/2) + 3,
rounded down. This parry is not at the usual -3 for parrying a weapon barehanded, greatly reducing the likelihood
of injury when you defend against an armed foe. In addition, Karate gives an improved retreating bonus when you parry; see Retreat (p. 377). For more on parrying barehanded, see Parrying Unarmed (p. 376).
To use Karate, any hand with which you wish to strike or parry must be empty (but you are free to wear heavy gauntlets, brass knuckles, etc. to increase damage). Because Karate relies heavily on footwork, all Karate attacks and parries take a penalty equal to your encumbrance level. For instance, Heavy encumbrance would give you -3 to hit or to parry an enemy
attack.

It can also depend on teh GM's cosmology. Astral projection psi with allies of protoplasmic projections can be quite effective- if the GM alllows it, or actual allies which are disembodied. For someone just learning psychokinisis is the easiest path to start- take the tallent then teh telekinisis power with the -10% limitation for being psionic, then buy your remote strength. True irony is buying up your psychokinetic strength and paying for it by lowering your physical strength.

Okay, can someone help me out? I'm making a 4E Gravity Manipulator, and I thought I had a grip on it, but apparently I was wrong. After looking through Supers, Powers, and Characters, I'm either not understanding how to do it properly, or I am utterly disappointed. I looks like I have to try and spread points over not only the Gravity Control Power, but also the Gravity Talent (just to use it), Crushing attack (at a +300% enhancement, to use gravity to do damage!), Telekinesis (to use Gravity to move things around), and Flight (to use Gravity to lift me and move me around). All told and after twiddling some levels around in GCA, if I want to be able to effect anything particularly impressive, it looks like I need to be playing around a 1200-point character...

By way of comparison, I'm sort of using the old Sue Storm (think 80s or early 90s) as a yardstick. She gets expensive, fast. So, can someone set me straight? Am I expecting too much from the power (and need to scale back my expectations), or am I totally misunderstanding how this works? Thanks in advance for any light y'all can shed on my dilemma.

One of the things about Powers is there are broad powers, and there are more limited ones. If you try to completely control the force of Gravity, it's going to be in the thousands. If you just buy telekinesis, flight, crushing attack, those kinds of things, maybe as alternate attacks, it won't be that bad.

I think I'd want some levels in a literal Control (from Powers) version capable of affecting an area to really have the flavor of 'gravity' as apposed to just TK.




 

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