Worldly Talk

Civil discussion and debate on real world events and issues.


US Citizenship Test

   
For the record, I knew that he was dodging the question. I just decided to point out how he dodged/misinterpreted the question in a satirical manner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Savayan View Post
For the record, I knew that he was dodging the question. I just decided to point out how he dodged/misinterpreted the question in a satirical manner.
So when he asked if I had ever been outside the US... How was I dodging the question, exactly, by my answer? I'd love for you to explain that. Any of you, really.
Either that, or apologize for impugning my character. Your behavior is not conductive to any manner of debate beyond trollish flaming.

He asked if you had ever moved outside the US.

So it's only splitting hairs when it's not you doing it, then?

EDIT: And for the record, yes. I've lived in (as in place of residence) several states in the Union and Iraq. I can count Iraq considering I spent more time outside the wire and living among the people than I did on a base. I could continue my 'multicultural' cred, but it's completely irrelevant to anything at all beyond defending against y'all's ad hominem attacks.

Lived in, or merely stayed at a US base that happened to be in that nation? It's important because there's a significant difference between visiting a nation as a tourist (or a soldier on deployment) verses actually immigrating somewhere. It's hardly semantics. I've been to Italy, Jordan, Mexico and Germany but that doesn't mean that I actually tried to immigrate there, nor have any sort of idea what it would be like to do so. Simply visiting is not what was asked and shouldn't be equivocated to make some asinine point.

How long were you there? Long enough to get an understanding of the local culture and language? 'Cause I was. It was a year-long deployment and like I said - I spent more time outside the wire than I did on the base. It was about eight-ten hours a day on our outpost (if we were lucky), and the rest of it was out among the locals. A huge amount of our job (remember, I deployed during the occupation, not the war) was meet-and-greets as well as conversating with the people on the street to find out how things were going. I became fluent enough with Arabic and the local body language that most of the Iraqis were convinced I was an Iraqi.
So yes, I think I can safely claim Iraq as one of the places I lived in.

Also like I said, this is largely irrelevant and off-topic. I'm not going to be entertaining this line of questioning any longer in this thread. If you feel it truly necessary, you know how to PM me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Solaris View Post
How long were you there? Long enough to get an understanding of the local culture and language? 'Cause I was. It was a year-long deployment and like I said - I spent more time outside the wire than I did on the base. It was about eight-ten hours a day on our outpost (if we were lucky), and the rest of it was out among the locals. A huge amount of our job (remember, I deployed during the occupation, not the war) was meet-and-greets as well as conversating with the people on the street to find out how things were going. I became fluent enough with Arabic and the local body language that most of the Iraqis were convinced I was an Iraqi.
So yes, I think I can safely claim Iraq as one of the places I lived in.

Also like I said, this is largely irrelevant and off-topic. I'm not going to be entertaining this line of questioning any longer in this thread. If you feel it truly necessary, you know how to PM me.
What does this have to do with moving to the US? The US has a broad range of cultures (yes, plural), specifically because every time a new group of immigrants arrives, they bring their culture with them. It's a good thing - it makes us better and stronger as a nation to absorb new ideas. To argue otherwise is to argue against the long slow march of history.

Water is also wet and gravity remains a downer. Yes, the US is a cultural melting-pot. This is not a recent development.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Solaris View Post
Water is also wet and gravity remains a downer. Yes, the US is a cultural melting-pot. This is not a recent development.
So why are you arguing that immigrants must give up their traditional cultures?




 

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Blog   Myth-Weavers Status