Worldly Talk

Civil discussion and debate on real world events and issues.


Social Justice in Schools

   
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ikul View Post
I thought this, too, but 15 minutes of google-fu failed to bring me any factual support so I decided not to make psychological claims like that.
I wouldn't worry about it, it's a straw man.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MonkWren View Post
It's difficult to objectively characterize emotion in any other way, as self-report simply isn't reliable (for any number of reasons). That said, how would an emotion be out of control without affecting behavior? In both academic literature and in personal experience, when emotions become out of control they produce behavioral effects; ergo, controlling one's emotions is controlling the behavioral response, and vice versa. Even in practical speech this becomes clear, as people talk about controlling emotions in behavioral terms (e.g: "get a hold of yourself") Again, I never said doing so was easy, simply that it is doable. Furthermore, if you care to re-read my previous post, I said:



Thereby arguing that yes, Principle 3 is flawed, and there is a better way to phrase the essence of what the author appears to be communicating.
Perhaps one disconnect, here, is in the difference between 'controlling emotion' as presented in the first article (fundamentally choosing whether and which emotions to feel at any given time) and 'keeping emotions under control' (choosing not to allow emotions to negatively impact one's life when possible, despite whether or not one is feeling them).

From the forbes article:
"For example, when faced with immense grief, the human mind has the power to choose between self-pity/alcoholism or refocus attention on creating a positive future. Yet, we forego this choice and allow ourselves to go deeper into our misery."
'(re)focusing attention on creating a positive future' does not in itself remove the emotion of 'immense grief', and might ultimately fail due to factors entirely outside of the individual's control.

Humans have the capability to influence their own emotions, mitigating the negative and reveling in the positive in turn, but the article's message of 'just choose to be happy' is offensive, misguided, and wrong.


As for the abstract, the link is no longer working for me, so I'll have to go from memory, but to (re)define emotion based solely on tendencies to action, even if doing otherwise is difficult, robs the concept and the experience of most of it's value and meaning.
Just because I tend not to knock people's teeth out (or take whatever other course of action one might associate with extreme anger) does not, in fact mean that I am not extremely angry.
Of the several 'stages' of emotional control in that abstract, only ONE pertains to, as I phrased above, 'controlling [one's] emotions'. I believe it was phrased 'changing cognition' or something of the sort.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedronai View Post
Perhaps one disconnect, here, is in the difference between 'controlling emotion' as presented in the first article (fundamentally choosing whether and which emotions to feel at any given time) and 'keeping emotions under control' (choosing not to allow emotions to negatively impact one's life when possible, despite whether or not one is feeling them).

From the forbes article:
"For example, when faced with immense grief, the human mind has the power to choose between self-pity/alcoholism or refocus attention on creating a positive future. Yet, we forego this choice and allow ourselves to go deeper into our misery."
'(re)focusing attention on creating a positive future' does not in itself remove the emotion of 'immense grief', and might ultimately fail due to factors entirely outside of the individual's control.

Humans have the capability to influence their own emotions, mitigating the negative and reveling in the positive in turn, but the article's message of 'just choose to be happy' is offensive, misguided, and wrong.
Couldn't agree more, my repeated rephrasing of that principle to "don't let your emotions emotions control your actions", which is what I read the author's intent to be.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tedronai
As for the abstract, the link is no longer working for me, so I'll have to go from memory, but to (re)define emotion based solely on tendencies to action, even if doing otherwise is difficult, robs the concept and the experience of most of it's value and meaning.
Just because I tend not to knock people's teeth out (or take whatever other course of action one might associate with extreme anger) does not, in fact mean that I am not extremely angry.
Of the several 'stages' of emotional control in that abstract, only ONE pertains to, as I phrased above, 'controlling [one's] emotions'. I believe it was phrased 'changing cognition' or something of the sort.
Well, as I said before, measuring actual emotion based on self-report is... problematic, at best, except when doing studies on therapeutic effectiveness (ie: evaluating different therapeutic techniques), so much of the time emotional responses (behaviors) are measured instead, as it tends to provide more reliable data and we simply don't have a way of measuring emotion directly. As to the sentence you are referring to, I believe it is this one:
Quote:
According to a process model of emotion regulation, emotion may be regulated at five points in the emotion generative process: (a) selection of the situation, (b) modification of the situation, (c) deployment of attention, (d) change of cognitions, and (e) modulation of responses.
It does certainly seem to suggest that the actual emotion we feel can be controlled (and this is true, to a certain extent); more important to the broader discussion, in my opinion, is how we control our behaviors in response to emotions, particularly strong emotions.

With enough prozac, you 8can8 choose to be happy though!
Wait, no, that's the wrong message too...

Quote:
Originally Posted by silveroak View Post
With enough prozac, you 8can8 choose to be happy though!
Wait, no, that's the wrong message too...
I chuckled.




 

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