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hypothetical science question

   
actually according to http://www.c14dating.com/agecalc.html it would be +/- 10 years, but even if it is someone in the same time period, would that mean it is in fact him, or did someone decide to use the same tomb a few years later because it was sitting empty? Though admittedly within 10 years does seem a bit soom, especially if tehre was any kind of reputation to the tomb (unless someone thought it would bring their loved one back to life- New Testement meets Stephen King...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Voxanadu View Post

Such a place would always be in question. Just like the shroud of Turin.
To my knowledge, the Shroud of Turin has been conclusively dated to the middle ages.

Quote:
Originally Posted by silveroak View Post
actually according to http://www.c14dating.com/agecalc.html it would be +/- 10 years, but even if it is someone in the same time period, would that mean it is in fact him, or did someone decide to use the same tomb a few years later because it was sitting empty? Though admittedly within 10 years does seem a bit soom, especially if tehre was any kind of reputation to the tomb (unless someone thought it would bring their loved one back to life- New Testement meets Stephen King...)
You can't prove it is him, but you can prove it is not him, if the date is off too much. But we're not really that sure about the date, place, cause of death or even
Supposing the stories in the Bible are at least based on an actual person who started the whole christian thing, he was not necessarily called Jesus.
name either, since we have no historical reference.

I would have thought there were more accurate tests for organics.

Since the question was about science, then anything going some way towards explaining the supernatural aspects would be immensely valuable. Learning facts rather than trying to disprove the assertions of a religion.

The shroud has been conclusively dated to the middle ages, and has even been placed at having been made in Turkey, where the creator apparently intended it as artwork to honor the crucifixtion and ressurection, and left behind a notebook explaining teh process by which it was made. Yet still there are people who insist that all of this has been fabricated to explain it away by those who are in league with the devil and trying to undermine Christianity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by silveroak View Post
Assuming the best case scneario for finding the 'tomb of Jesus'- for example finding a tomb with a Latin inscription reading "here lies Jesus of Nazarath, self proclaimed king of the Jews" (because the Romans would certainly not have accepted teh legitimacy of the claim) and inside the remains of a body are found. The idea is put forth, of course, that perhaps after the tomb was vaccasted it was reused- how would you test for this?

i ask because with all the history channels specials and othe rissues being thrown about, the issue remains for me that we don't exactly have any DNa for comparison, how would we even know? It is not meant as an attack on religion or to imply that such a found body would be Jesus, merely a question on how the claim would be scientifically tested.
I wouldn't expect to find the body. Assuming that you disagree with version that He was raised from the death, the most logical version would be as claimed Jewish religious hierarchy of that time that his body was indeed stolen by the disciples.

Really? I prefer the tetrodotixin explanation myself, but the key point is that if someone found what is possibly his body (tomb, ossuary, etc.) how would you test that? Given enough tests to eliminate other possibilities, how certian could it really be?

Maybe if you were to do a digital facial reconstruction using the skull (assuming it is intact), you could match it to the descriptions given for Jesus, Mary, and Joseph and use hereditary inheritance to say at most whether it could be him or not. This would by no means get you a definite answer, but it could be a place to start.

I never did pay attention in religious education, but there are somewhere around 156 books (I believe that's what the chapters are called) that didn't make the final cut into the Bible as we know it, and I could have sworn that one of them had described what at least on of the three aforementioned individuals looked like.

But honestly, I really can't say I'm anywhere near an expert on the bible; I was just simply giving a possibility that I knew Historians use currently.




 

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