Notices


House Rules

 
House Rules

Ability GenerationStats are generated using 4d6-drop-lowest rolled 7 times, taking the six most preferable scores and distributed as you wish.
If desired, after assigning your six ability scores, you may opt to increase your highest score to an 18 if you also reduce your lowest score to an 8. If your lowest score is already below an 8, it does not change.

Ability Score IncreaseYou increase two different abilities by one at every fourth level.
Normally you only increase a single ability by one at every fourth level.

Base Class Bonus FeatsThe _____ Plus feats from d20 Future are now counted among the bonus feats that the base classes may choose from. A class can choose the corresponding ______ Plus feat as a bonus feat.
i.e. Someone taking a second level of Tough Hero class could choose Tough Plus as their bonus feat.
They could not take Smart, Charismatic, Fast, Strong or Dedicated Plus as their bonus feat.

Fractional BAB / SavesYou may use fractional BAB.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1steptooquick View Post
Basically it allows for characters that multiclass to keep their BAB from falling behind. So for Example in d20 modern a Fast 1, Smart 1, Charismatic 1 would have a BAB of +0. With Fractional BAB they would have a +.75, +.5, +.5= +1.75, that rounds down to a BAB of +1.
I put together a Google Docs spreadsheet calculator for the fractional BAB/Saves. Use this link and plug in the number of levels you have in the second (B) column and it will add up everything at the top.

Base classes are listed first, then prestige/advanced classes, all in alphabetical order. I included everything I could find/recall from the MSRD, plus those couple classes from Cyberscape. The Level header shows a sum of the levels. The spreadsheet does save changes made to it, so this will help prevent mistakes such as counting levels left over from a previous user.

Also, I don't know if multiple users can alter a spreadsheet at the same time, but watch out for that...

SkillsThe following skills are being consolidated.

Athletics contains Climb, Jump and Swim
Hide contains both Hide and Move Silently.
Spot contains both Spot and Listen.
Tumble contains both Tumble and Balance.


Wealth & CraftingSeeing as currency is meaningless outside of a society that recognizes it, there is no Wealth in space. Crafting, though, remains.

In place of XP, we'll be using Grams of Rare Material. (GoRM) It's a 1:1 ratio, 1 GoRM in place of 1 XP. GoRM may be acquired through loot. On occasion (10% chance), specific GoRM (SGoRM) will be found. It's worth twice as much as normal, but only for a specific application. (Armor, Gadget, Vehicle, or Weapon) SGoRM may be used in place of GoRM for any crafting outside its specific application at the normal 1:1 ratio.

Failure on a craft check that involves GoRM will destroy an amount of GoRM depending on how much you missed the DC by. For every point by which the check failed, 5% of the GoRM will be rendered useless. Thus, missing the DC by 20 or more will destroy every bit of GoRM you tried using. SGoRM is destroyed before GoRM, if both were being used in a single craft attempt.

The Salvage feat will provide a means of attaining additional GoRM. The amount is equal to the Wealth Increase value on table 1-1 of page 13 in d20 Future, multiplied by 50. The feat also doubles character's chances of finding SGoRM.

Furthermore, the Engineer class ability "Craft XP Reserve" will now give the Engineer an equal amount of SGoRM in place of XP. The SGoRM must all be for the same designated category (Armor, Gadget, Vehicle, or Weapon), but the Engineer may designate a different category at each level gained. This represents the Engineer making extreme efforts to extract every bit of GoRM possible, and using it to full efficiency.

Additionally, the Engineer may apply his Engineer levels as a bonus to his Craft check for the purpose of figuring out the amount of lost GoRM for a failed craft check. Thus, a level 5 engineer would have to fail a craft check by 6 or more to lose any GoRM. A level 10 Engineer would have to fail his craft check by a whopping 30 to lose all the GoRM involved.

Crafting advanced technology also costs GoRM. This cost is equal to the PDC, with some additional factors. For each PL above 6 a piece of tech is, multiply the cost by 2. Thus, the Piercing Visor, a PL7 device with a PDC of 15, would use up 30 GoRM. (Doubled for being one PL above 6) A theoretical pair of time-travelling high-heel shoes, a PL9 fashion with a PDC of 28, would cost 224 GoRM. (28 doubled thrice)

This cost is in addition to any Mastercraft properties. Modifying a device follows the same rules, using the PDC of the enhancement and the PL of the device being modified.

Telepresence

Telepresence: The act or state of acting through an avatar at a distance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Penchant View Post
A character can make contact with and enact a telepresence session with a robot. For the duration of the telepresence session the character can act as if they were in the robot body, possessing all of it's physical capabilities and having access to all of it's hardware and programming including skill and feat software. Depending on the robot, the connection and the hardware used to enact the session, there may be penalties or bonuses associated with the connection.


To begin a session you must have three things:
1. An interface
2. A connection
3. A robot

The Interface-

An interface can be anything as basic as a computer with keyboard and mouse or as complicated as a full VR suit or even a cybernetic link directly to the mind. The more sensory input and the more control a user has, the better they are at controlling their temporary robot body. At the best, there is perfect synergy and they feel as if the robot body is like their own.

Standard computer interface Can only take 1 Physical standard action per round. Suffers a -6 penalty to all physical skills and Perception Skills that the robot does not have hardwired into it. Suffers a -6 to hit with attacks. If the Robot has a higher attack bonus than the user does with the penalty, that takes precedence.

Basic VR Interface Can take normal physical actions in a round. Suffers a -4 penalty to all physical skills and Perception Skills that the robot does not have hardwired into it. Suffers a -2 to hit with attacks. If the Robot has a higher attack bonus than the user does with the penalty, that takes precedence. A VR interface can be a HUD (whether head mounted or cyberware) or other simulation device. The connection can provide too much bio-feedback should the robot be damaged. When the robot takes physical damage, the user must make a DC 10 Will save or suffer 1 Wisdom damage.

Advanced VR Interface Can take normal physical actions in a round. Suffers a -2 penalty to all physical skill and Perception skills that the robot does not have hardwired into it. If the Robot has a higher attack bonus than the user does with the penalty, that takes precedence. Such an interface is usually a full body apparatus or a direct mind interface like the Vehicle Control Jack. The connection can provide too much bio-feedback should the robot be damaged. When the robot takes physical damage, the user must make a DC 10 Will save or suffer 1d4 Wisdom damage.

Perfect Interface Only a direct mind interface can create this level of telepresence. The robot's body acts as if it were the user's own body. Use which ever skill and attack bonuses are higher. Only a cybernetic interface specialized to the task will work at this level. The connection can provide too much bio-feedback should the robot be damaged. When the robot takes physical damage, the user takes the same amount of hit point damage.

The Connection-

Connecting to the robot is an important step and usually requires an application of the Computer use skill and appropriate equipment. Most often, the actual connection is wireless, though both the interface and the robot must have wireless capabilities in order for this to work. Wired connections are also possible and this usually covers telepresencing stationary robots like auto-turrets. To commandeer a friendly robot (one you have access codes and permissions to), it merely requires a DC 10 computer use check to load appropriate software and make the connection. To commandeer a hostile robot you must first hack the system just as you would any other computer.

More than one robot can be connected to at a time, but the user must spend actions to operate the robot. If the user is not actively controlling the robot, it sits stationary and takes no action even if it otherwise would be able to act on it's own. It resumes it's normal functions only when the user is disconnected. Switching the interface between controlled robots is a move action.

The Robot -

Telepresence requires a robot to connect to. The more advanced robot you have, the more you can do. Unless otherwise specified, you can choose to either use your own skills and abilities (usually at a penalty) or the robot's own, whichever is higher. Robots without an Intelligence score cannot resist telepresencing (once you have used the right access codes or hacked their systems) but those with a semblance of Intelligence can resist if hacked. At the beginning of every encounter you must re-roll Computer use to maintain control of the robot.





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