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Autism, Asperger's, and Roleplaying

   
Autism, Asperger's, and Roleplaying

One of my friends is an autism self-advocate. She's participating in the following research study and asked that her friends invite others to join it, too. The study is the second in a series, and it's apparently titled "Autism, Asperger's and Roleplaying: Survey Two." (Sounds to me like it might be of interest to more than a few on Myth Weavers.)

Here's some more detail, from my friend: "It should take about an hour uninterrupted, and can be paused as long as your computer isn't shut down, or the browser closed. Some of the questions may be sensitive or triggering, but the entire survey is anonymous and will collect no personally identifiable information, including IP addresses."

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/...VFFJdDNsYWc6MQ

One hour is a very generous estimation; if you can work without interruption, 15-25 minutes are sufficient to complete the questionnaire.

I'm rather interested in the result of the study - and for that, a sufficiently large supply of data is mandatory, hence if you can spare the time...

(Note: I'm not affiliated in any way with the study or its organization)

I'm also interested in the answers.

I agree with Whisper's time estimate. I don't believe it took me longer than 20 minutes.

It's interesting, and yeah, doesn't take too long unless you have a penchant for overthinking things.

Took me about fifteen minutes. I'm curious about the answers as well. Some of the questions seemed a little odd, and I wonder if they'd ask a group of athletes if they've been emotionally or physically abused.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkaelis View Post
Took me about fifteen minutes. I'm curious about the answers as well. Some of the questions seemed a little odd, and I wonder if they'd ask a group of athletes if they've been emotionally or physically abused.
People on the autistic spectrum are more liable to be emotionally abused by their peers because they're different to their peers. There are people who think that Aspergers and other autistic spectrum conditions are diseases to be cured or that it can be "beaten out of them". Those, and other misgivings, are a big opener to many types of abuse.

I've got a friend who has been to conventions geared towards parents of kids on the spectrum and some of the parents were saying things like:
"I don't want my kid out of nappies (diapers to the US speakers) because I get more money for them still being in nappies."

Carers do get a lot of financial benefits (it counts toward pension credits as if they'd worked a full time job) and they don't have to go down the job centre to sign up for as long as their ward continues to get disability benefits. So there are parents/guardians who will and do abuse that.

So yes there is a lot of potential for abuse.

I generally find identity language and made-up pronouns infuriating (irrational, I know), but I was interested to read the questions and disclaimer related to labels and language in a category with which I was mostly unfamiliar.

When we were in graduate school (and my wife was taking calculus using "little Spivak"), I had a t-shirt made for her that said, "Ey is a person with lesbianism".

She never wears it. :-(

In return she bought be a shirt that says . . . something I can't repeat. I still wear it to bed. :-D

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnas View Post
People on the autistic spectrum are more liable to be emotionally abused by their peers because they're different to their peers. There are people who think that Aspergers and other autistic spectrum conditions are diseases to be cured or that it can be "beaten out of them". Those, and other misgivings, are a big opener to many types of abuse.

I've got a friend who has been to conventions geared towards parents of kids on the spectrum and some of the parents were saying things like:
"I don't want my kid out of nappies (diapers to the US speakers) because I get more money for them still being in nappies."

Carers do get a lot of financial benefits (it counts toward pension credits as if they'd worked a full time job) and they don't have to go down the job centre to sign up for as long as their ward continues to get disability benefits. So there are parents/guardians who will and do abuse that.

So yes there is a lot of potential for abuse.
The "beat it out of them" is widely discredited, but they are still a vulnerable population that generally sees higher-than-average bullying and abuse.

Edit: Also, interesting study. I'd say it seems more like a mental health vs. roleplaying study, although there's a definite lean towards the autism spectrum.




 

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