Rakesh Morgan (Now a NPC)

   
Rakesh Morgan (Now a NPC)

Rakesh Morgan
Madboy Morgan

Type: Werewolf
Pack: None
Tribe: Bone Shadow
Lodge: Lodge of the Hallowed Halls
Auspice: Ithaeur
Aspect:
Rituals cost New Dots x3, Rites costs (New Dots -1); No 10-again on Gifts
Isibiluda, The Ritualist
Born: 1975



Virtue: Prudence. Rakesh is a cautious man by nature, and the fact that in his world you play for keeps just reinforces that. Rakesh always tries to be the man with the plan, and to make sure that nothing comes back to bite him in the tail someday.
Vice: Envy. Other people seem to have all the luck. Rakesh knows he's smarter than most anyone else, but it's the dumb jocks of the world who always seem to win the prize, get the girl and win the job. It's just not fair.

Background: Everyone needs a hobby. Rakesh Morgan's hobby just so happens to involve being chased by death-spirits through abandoned houses near London on a regular basis.

It began in high school. Rakesh was always one of the 'weird kids', a lonely, quiet boy with all the charisma and force-of-personality of a baby rabbit. He sat in the back, rarely spoke up in class, and made no friends. Even the bullies eventually left him alone, after learning that the scrawny, weedy kid was capable of fighting with a wild abandon, on one notable instance having to be pulled off another child.

It didn't help that Rakesh was also smart, as in near-genius. His parents, a Welsh construction worker and a British Indian waitress, failed to understand his proclivities completely. His father would take him to see the football game, Rakesh would only dream of when he could get home and do something interesting, like read a book. Books were Rakesh's only friends for most of his childhood. And what books they were, the grimmer and darker the better. For somewhere in Rakesh there was a morbid streak a mile long, the product of an upbringing in which meaningful human contact was difficult.

By the time he was accepted into King's College London on a scholarship, Rakesh had taken to haunting the British Museum and other prominent libraries. He read The Witch-Cult in Western Europe by the anthropologist Dr. Margaret Murray, and Aleister Crowley's The Book of Lies. Occult and peculiar history was his hobby, something mystical and exciting to get away from an otherwise humdrum existence.

King's College was the young man's saving grace. His intellect was for once appreciated, and pretty soon Rakesh was heavily enrolled in the anthropology and social history courses. He completed a Bachelors and began to work towards a Masters in Anthropology, and after several summers of volunteering and working part-time for the National Trust, Rakesh had a job lined up with them after he graduated. In short, everything was finally beginning to look up.

Then came the First Change. At first, Rakesh thought he was going mad. He would walk to the Tube station and spot Ankou, the proto-Grim Reaper of the Breton myths, standing behind a sickly-looking girl on the train. He'd gaze out across the street from his apartment window, and on a distant branch is an owl the size of a man, with skulls emblazoned on its feathers. For most werewolves, the First Change is a whirlwind of confusion and ignorance, but for Rakesh, it was a flood of nightmarish understanding. He saw things he'd only read about, things which were not, could not be real.

But if they weren't, then what was he seeing? Had the world gone mad, or just Rakesh Morgan?

It was on a snowy night in January. The crescent moon was high in the night sky, and Rakesh was trudging home after a long day of studying. When Rakesh looked up to check the color of a light, he was confronted with a horseman in archaic armor, clutching a spear that dripped spectral blood. Rakesh backed away, turned and ran from this hideous apparition, only to find a great black dog, the size of a pony, blocking the way behind him. Rakesh thought true madness was here, and he ran again, but each way he turned, but the death spirits that had hovered near Rakesh for so many years were not so easily dissuaded. Again Rakesh was blocked, and once more, and then something... snapped.

Rakesh's was not a happy change, but few are. When the local Forsaken finally found him, some hours later, he was in a cemetery, smashing headstones with one might blow after another. They took him in and calmed him down, and from that day forward, Rakesh Morgan became one of the Forsaken. After his First Change display, there really wasn't any question of tribe. Rakesh was one of the Bone Shadows, as ordained a choice as could be imagined.

In a way, Rakesh was fortunate. Though the First Change would haunt his nightmares for years afterwards, it did not touch his family and friends. Rakesh may have thought he was going insane, but he was a private man, and kept it to himself. When the First Change occurred, it was far away from home or work, and though Rakesh committed several thousand euros worth of vandalism and a fair bit of desecration, there was no blood on his claws. The fact that Rakesh periodically woke up in a cold sweat, sure that Ankou was coming for him, seemed a small price to pay.

Since then, Rakesh has somehow managed to maintain both his life as Rakesh Morgan and Madboy Morgan the Werewolf, largely by means of having lots of luck, a mental detachment that can periodically border on the sociopathic, and the fact that he is just really unimpressive. As Rakesh Morgan, he finished his masters degree in anthropology, and went to work for the National Trust, a British charity organization concerned with the historical preservation of old buildings and otherwise culturally or ecologically significant locations. Rakesh was their man to find such places, evaluate them on their historical worthiness (the National Trust, though a very wealthy charity by most standards, still does not have unlimited resources), and make plans for restoration and preservation.

At the same time, Madboy Morgan the Werewolf is the local brainiac and budding ritemaster. In his quiet and unnoticed way, Rakesh has settled into the local pack, and has set himself the personal task of learning everything about the spirit world that can possibly be known. Already, it's generally admitted that when it comes to spirit-lore, Rakesh is as good as some Ithaeur close to twice his age. Moreover, the scrawny fellow is also pretty good to have in a brawl, fighting in a manner more reminiscent of a rabid weasel than a full werewolf. Not particularly glorious, pretty effective.

What few realize is that Rakesh's skill at understanding the spirit-world is in large part a result of his anthropological training. Rakesh applies the rigors of modern research techniques to the legends of the Uratha, and though Rakesh admits that he'll never become a true anthropologist (at least, not unless he snags another scholarship), he can put it to pretty good work cataloguing the world of the Shadow. Of course, there's a downside. Treating the Uratha as research subjects has disassociated Rakesh from them, and though he knows in his brain that he is one of them, in his heart he's still Rakesh Morgan, not Madboy Morgan the Werewolf. This is a problem that probably only age and experience will rectify, though its unlikely that Rakesh will ever ascend to the heights of Harmony.

Recently, Rakesh was fired from his job from the National Trust after he was caught grave-robbing, and these days he runs an antique store and website, www.Morganantiques.com, which is enough to let him eat regularly. He's also left his pack over a falling out.

On first impression, Rakesh is a weed. On second impression, Rakesh is a slightly creepy weed. All his life, Rakesh has been an unprepossessing person, a mild-mannered young man with a nervous smile and a soft voice. It wasn't that people disliked Rakesh, they just tended to ignore him and forget him. Since the First Change, to this naturally unimpressive exterior has been added a slight edge, like that of a wolf on the prowl, an aura of barely suppressed violence that most people find unnerving. Considering that he's also a half-Indian man in War on Terror era London, and Rakesh gets asked for his passport and subjected to more than his share of searches, despite the fact that his accent is purest London. Still, to those who know him, Rakesh seems a mild and unassuming man.

This is rubbish. Behind Rakesh's forgettable facade lies a formidable and rather bitter intellect. The companionship of King's College, the National Trust, and the Uratha hasn't quite worn away the bitter misanthropy that emerged during Rakesh's school days, when he felt himself the sole man of the mind amongst a sea of dumb brutes. Though much softer and more pleasant than he used to be, Rakesh still has a streak of misanthropy in him that leads him to expect the worst of people. Had circumstances been not too different, Rakesh could've been one of the spree-shooters one reads about in the Telegraph.

As is, Rakesh's impressive mind and simmering resentment towards humanity is sublimated into an interest in the ghoulish and macabre. He finds it weirdly pleasant and relaxing, reading up the latest research on the Thuggee cult of pre-British India in the British Museum. Mostly, Rakesh keeps his interest under his hat, having realized that discussions of the etymology of the Arabian Ghul is not particularly socially acceptable.

Finally, Rakesh is also very stubborn, and very much a scrapper. When confronted with a problem, Rakesh rarely backs down, attacking it from multiple angles until it falls. When the problem happens to be a recalcitrant spirit-ridden, the 'attacking' just happens to be more literal. Rakesh isn't the strongest or the fastest werewolf around, but he's tough and he doesn't back down, which makes him rather useful in a fight. And he is, after all, a werewolf.


Tribe: Bone Shadow
Lodge: Lodge of the Hallowed Halls
Auspice: Ithaeur
Aspect:
Rituals cost New Dots x3, Rites costs (New Dots -1); No 10-again on Gifts
Isibiluda, The Ritualist

PMental Attributes: Intelligence 5, Wits 4(6), Resolve 3
SPhysical Attributes:
Reflexive Action, take 1L to boost by 2 for the Scene
Strength 3 (4/6/5/3/7)+2, Dexterity 3 (3/4/5/5/5), Stamina 4 (5/6/6/5/8)
TSocial Attributes: Presence 1, Manipulation 2, Composure 4

PMental Skills: Academics (Anthropology, Research) 5, Computer 3, Crafts 1, Investigation 4, Medicine 2, Occult (Necromancy) 5, Politics 1, Science 4
SPhysical Skills: Athletics 3, Brawl (Bite) 3, Stealth 4, Survival 3
TSocial Skills: Animal Ken 1, Expression 1, Intimidation (Death Glare) 4, Subterfuge 4

Merits: Merits: Fast Reflexes 2, Languages (First Tongue, Chinese, Latin, Welsh; Native is English) 3, Resources 2, Shadow Cult Initiation (
Free New ID •, May purchase Tokens
Harbingers) 3,
Fake set of papers in the name of someone or other
New ID) 1
Lair: The Russell House/Morgan's Antiques; Size 3, Library (Necromancy, Occult History of London, Urban Legends) 3, Ritual Area (Uratha Rites) 2, Security 2,
A 2-dot locus that is also mobile; takes the form of a man-sized steamer trunk with numerous scratchmarks on the inside of the lid.
Mobile Locus (The Steamer Trunk) 3

Fetishes:
This bag holds more on the inside than on the outside. It can hold up to 64 feet of cubic volume (a 4x4x4 foot volume) and unlimited weight, and weigh no more than an empty bag when closed. Unless activated, it actually is an empty bag, and thus the objects inside cannot be spotted by means of mundane investigation.
Traveller's Blanket (Takes the form of a small doctor's bag) 4,
Reflexive Action, take 1L of damage, gain +2 Strength for the scene.
Woad Tattoo 3,
When activated, everyone except the user rolls Stamina+Composure at a -8 penalty. On an ES, the listeners suffer no ill effects. On a success, they take a -3 to all rolls involving hearing for the rest of the scene. On a failure, the listener loses Willpower, Essence, or takes Lethal damage in any combination equal to the fetish-user’s successes, listener’s choice. On a dramatic failure, the listener takes 4 aggravated damage. After usage, Death Wolf’s Howl has to be recharged by howling into it and letting it sit in darkness for three days.
Death Wolf’s Howl 3,
1E; +2 to Wits, and Rakesh gets the Mighty Bound Gift (see later)
Salmon Charm 4,
Rakesh actually has three charms, each one with a different effect, and each one activating on a Reflexive action.

• One adds +3 to his initiative.
• One adds +1 to his defense for a number of rounds equal to successes on the activation roll / his Primal Urge if essence was spent.
• One, if Rakesh spends 1 Essence, grants him 9-again on a single, instant-action roll.
Protective Charm (x3) 1 each

Willpower: 7
Harmony: 5

Initiative: 9 (9/10/11/11/11) (+3 w/ Protective Charm)
Defense: 3 (3/4/5/5/5) (+1 w/ Protective Charm)
Health: 8 (10/12/11/8/16)
Size 5 (6/7/6/4/8)
Speed: 11 (12/15/18/16/20)

Primal Urge: 4
Renown: Cunning ●●●, Glory ●●, Wisdom ●●●●●
Gifts:
1st: Death Sight (Death) 1, Two-World Eyes (Crescent Moon) 1, Heart of Things (Wisdom) 1, Sense Emotion (Insight) 1, Partial Change (Mother Luna) 1
2nd: Ghost Knife (Death) 2, Read Spirit (Crescent Moon) 2, Scent of Taint (Insight) 2, Befuddle (Wisdom) 2, Anybeast (Mother Luna) 2, Hone Rage (Rage) 2, Mighty Bound (Strength; Fetish) 2
3rd: Echo Dream (Insight) 3, Blending (Stealth) 3
4th: Skin-Stealing (Mother Luna) 4
5th: Primal Form (Mother Luna) 5
Rituals
Unless otherwise specified, all Rites have a dice pool of Harmony+Rituals.

Suggested Modifiers
[b]+2 Ritemaster meditates successfully prior to ritual (that is, four or more successes are accumulated in a meditation Attribute task — see World of Darkness Rulebook, p. 51)
+2 In the vicinity of a powerful locus (rated ••••+)
+1 In the vicinity of a locus (rated • to •••)
+1 Ritualist has gained goodwill of local spirits
+1 Ritemaster is in Dalu form
+1 Ritemaster’s auspice moon is in the sky
–1 to –3 Performer suffers wound penalties
–1 Local spirits are hostile to ritualist
–1 City suburb or town (only if rite is performed in physical world)
–1 Distracting environment (powerful odors, noisy)
–2 Packmates are involved in battle
–2 Dense urban area (only if rite is performed in physical world)
–2 Ritemaster is struck during rite but takes no damage
–3 Rite is performed in a Barren
: 4; Rites:
1st
Preserving the Trail
This rite keeps a scent trail from going cold with respect to the ritualist, so that she can continue to follow it for days, weeks, months, or even years if need be. In ancient times, fugitives from the justice of the People might run to distant lands, expecting to escape their just punishments through distance, alone. Irraka were often called upon to pursue these criminals into far-off places, to deliver judgment upon them, no matter where they might flee.

Performing the Rite: The ritualist performs the rite at a location at which she can catch the scent in question. This may be the quarry’s living quarters or just a place that he happened to pass through a couple of hours ago. Alternatively, she can use an article of clothing or something else that carries his scent, allowing the rite to be enacted almost anywhere. She locates the strongest source of the scent and closely sniffs at and even tastes the specific site or object. She then intones the following in the First Tongue: Nihu ba eshe ges (roughly translated, “I will find you anywhere in the world.”)

Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual
Action: Instant

Success: For one full lunar month, the quarry’s scent (see Werewolf: The Forsaken, 178–80) does not fade with respect to the ritualist; no matter how much time passes or what environmental conditions occur (rain or snow, for instance), his trail remains fresh and easily tracked. Provided that the ritualist successfully performs this rite again before its duration elapses, she can indefinitely preserve the integrity of a scent trail. Successes accrued for supernatural occlusion effects that might compromise the scent of the prey are directly compared against the ritualist’s successes, with ties going to the quarry. If the werewolf presently has the taste of the prey’s blood, however, ties go to the ritualist.
Exceptional Success: The trail remains fresh for the ritualist for an entire year of lunar months (a little over 354 days).
Preserving the Trail,
Rite of Dedication
This ritual allows the ritualist to magically ‘dedicate’ an object so that it transforms along with a werewolf during shapeshifting. If feasible, the object alters size/dimensions to suit the new form, or failing that, merges in with the flesh. For example, if a werewolf has dedicated a suit of clothes, a necklace and a wristwatch, all these objects change in size to suit his new form when he assumes Dalu. When he shifts to Gauru, the clothes merge with his flesh, but the wristwatch and necklace might shift size again. When he takes Urhan form, the wristwatch also blends with his flesh, while the necklace might remain. In addition, all these objects remain with him when he enters the spirit world, although the un-dedicated flashlight he carries doesn’t.

A simple set of clothing counts as one item. A backpack and its contents also count as one item, although only the contents inside the backpack at the time of the rite. If a werewolf later adds something to the backpack, it doesn’t count as dedicated unless the rite is performed again with the new object inside. The contents of an article of clothing’s pockets aren’t considered part of the clothing, unless the werewolf dedicates that particular article of clothing as a separate item. Therefore, if a werewolf dedicates a business suit to himself as “one item,” the watch in his pocket doesn’t count as dedicated. If, however, he dedicates his favorite pair of jeans to himself as one item, the wallet in the pocket counts as dedicated.

Performing the Rite: The ritemaster may perform this ritual on himself or on other werewolves. It involves cutting the recipient with a claw and smearing his blood on the item in question, drawing a circular pattern. At the culmination of the rite, the item absorbs the blood, leaving no stain. The ritual takes a few minutes for every item to be dedicated.
Cost: None
Action: Extended (10 successes, each roll is one turn)

The character may not have more than (Primal Urge) in items dedicated to him at any one time, and the ritualist may dedicate items for another werewolf.
Rite of Dedication,
Call Beast

Similar to the rites used to summon spirits and humans, this simple rite calls a single animal (or a swarm of very small animals like rats or locusts) to the ritemaster’s location. The ritual summons the closest animal of a desired species within five miles; if no such creature exists (trying to summon a Siberian tiger in the middle of rural Nebraska, for instance), the rite fails. The ritemaster cannot summon a specific animal, nor can she summon supernatural animals or animals with human-level intelligence.

Performing the Rite: The ritualist marks a specific location and remains close to that spot throughout the performance. He must provide “chiminage” for the animal, typically a moderate amount of food the animal would eat. The ritualist performs a howl of summons while moving counterclockwise around the chiminage. Once the rite has been initiated, the ritualist and any packmates nearby must emit a further howl of summons roughly every five minutes until the rite’s subject arrives.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual vs. Resolve
Action: Extended (15 successes, each roll is one minute

The animal feels an irresistible compulsion to travel to the ritemaster’s location. The beast enters a kind of fugue state; it retains some awareness of his surroundings (enough to navigate and avoid hazards), but it does not react to stimuli. It is drawn for no obvious reason to the ritemaster’s location. It travels to the werewolf’s location as quickly as it can manage. Unlike most animals, it does not try to avoid human inhabited areas or contact with humans, which might create a panic depending on the type of animal summoned.

Once the animal arrives, it can be given a single, simple command (e.g. attack him, follow her, guard me, carry this to here), which it obeys to the best of its ability. If the task is not completed by the end of the scene (or if it is open-ended), the effect ends at the end of the scene. Otherwise, the animal is released from the rite’s effects when the task is completed.

If it takes the animal more than an hour to reach the ritualist, the magic of the rite breaks down. The subject of the rite no longer feels any compulsion to find the ritualist. This rite does not grant the summoned animal any ability to bypass barriers or escape bonds; while it might be possible to affect the tiger at the Bronx Zoo with this ritual, the tiger won’t be able to get out of its enclosure (though it will try mightily for an hour).
Call Beast,
Rite of Spirit's Promise
Bone Shadows deal with spirits on a regular basis, and it helps to speak from a position of strength. The best way to gain such a position, of course, is to know a spirit’s ban, but finding out this information is a matter of careful investigation (the Gift: Read Spirit works, too, but not every pack has a Crescent Moon). The Rite of the Spirit’s Promise determines a spirit’s ban fairly quickly, but the rite also risks reprisal — spirits don’t like being so closely investigated by Uratha. A Bone Shadow performing this rite on a spirit more powerful that he is had better have his pack handy.

Performing the Rite: The werewolf need not be able to see the spirit in order to use this rite, but he must be in the spirit’s presence or know its name. The Bone Shadow intones a quiet First Tongue phrase asking for insight, and draws a symbol in the dirt or on a wall. If the ritual succeeds, knowledge of the spirit’s ban becomes clear to the werewolf. In any case, though, the spirit might notice what is happening, and it can use the connection created by the rite to attack the ritualist.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual vs. Resolve
Action: Extended (Spirit's Rank, each roll is one turn)

Success: Progress is made toward the goal. When the player accrues successes equal to the spirit’s Rank, the spirit’s ban comes to the character in a flash of insight. The Storyteller does not provide the mechanical aspects of the ban, however. For instance, a garbage-spirit might suffer three points of damage to its Corpus per turn of contact with cleansing chemicals. If the character uses this rite, though, all she knows is that the spirit “cannot abide the touch of cleansing chemicals,” not that it damages the spirit. Each turn that the character rolls to accrue successes for this rite, the targeted spirit has a chance to notice what’s happening. The Storyteller rolls the spirit’s Finesse. If the roll succeeds, the spirit realizes what is happening and can use its Numina on the werewolf as if it possessed the Reaching Numen (see p. 278 of Werewolf: The Forsaken). The spirit can use its powers only on the ritualist (unless the spirit actually knows the Reaching Numen, of course), and only as long as the rite continues.
Exceptional Success: Significant progress is made toward the goal. If the rite concludes with successes equal to the spirit’s Rank + 5, the Storyteller must inform the player of the mechanical aspects of the ban.
Rite of Spirit's Promise,
Chiminage Rite

The practice of chiminage, offering a spirit a gift of Essence to gain a favor or coerce it into some action, is a long-standing part of werewolf culture. Offerings of chiminage are even integrated into many rites. This rite formalizes the practice, imbuing the act with spiritual significance that gives the ritemaster a subtle power over a spirit. Ithaeur often use this rite as a “carrot” to open negotiations, before employing the “stick” of banishment or the like.

Performing the Rite: The Ithaeur sets up an altar (which can be as minimal as a circle drawn in the dirt around a campfire to an elaborate construction of stone reminiscent of a church altar) with a source of flame on it. With a small knife or a claw, she carves off a piece of an object representative of the spirit to whom she is offering chiminage and places it in the fire. Intoning an offering of peace in the First Tongue, she spends a point of Essence to catalyze the offering. The spirit that is the subject of this rite must be at hand when this rite is performed.

Cost: None
Action: Extended (3 successes per rank of the spirit, each roll represents one minute)

When the ritemaster accumulates the required number of successes, the target gains one point of Essence per dot of the ritemaster’s Wisdom Renown. The ritemaster gains a +2 bonus on Gifts, rites, and Social rolls against the target for the rest of the scene. In addition, the performance of this rite removes the need to offer chiminage as part of the performance of any further rites during the scene. Upon an ES, this effect lasts for a week instead.
Chiminage Rite,
Ritual Mind
This holy ritual (which Rakesh does not consider much holy) obviates penalties to a ritual-roll.

Performing the Rite: A werewolf can only use this rite to assist in using another, and the same werewolf must perform both rites. She must prepare all of the materials required for the other rite before starting, and only enacts this rite when ready to start the other as well. The werewolf faces east if she cannot see Mother Luna or west if she is visible in the sky. From there, she takes one deep breath and howls her need for clear thought and balance to the four cardinal directions, turning clockwise. The rite takes less than two minutes to perform.

Cost: 1 Essence
Action: Instant

Upon success, the ritualist gains one dice to the next ritual that can only be used to offset penalties (not gain a bonus). Upon an ES, he gains three dice.
Ritual Mind
2nd
Curse of Shadows
This unpleasant rite turns darkness itself against its intended victim. Until the night of the next full moon, she is plagued by visions of menacing black shapes and her sight is clouded by shadow. While the rite is most easily turned against members of the herd, some few Uratha have managed to use it to powerful effect against other werewolves who displease them.

Performing the Rite: Standing over an object of personal significance to the rite’s intended target (a family heirloom, a “lucky” garment, or something of the like), the ritualist walks counterclockwise around the item, continually chanting in the First Tongue: Thi sah kathar (“Suffer in darkness”), until the ritual is either successfully completed or fails.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals versus the subject’s Composure + Primal Urge
Action: Contested and extended (the ritualist must accrue successes equal to the subject’s Composure, while the subject must accrue successes equal to the ritualist’s Willpower; each roll requires a minute’s time)

Success: If the ritualist is the first to reach the required number of successes, then the subject is haunted by dark visions (suffering a one-die penalty to all rolls based on her Resolve) and her vision is distorted by phantom shadows (inflicting a two-dice penalty on all Wits + Composure perceptions rolls related to sight), until the night of the next full moon. If the victim dramatically fails a Resolve or perception roll during this time, she gains the suspicion derangement until the ritual expires (or, if she already has suspicion, then it temporarily upgrades to paranoia).
Exceptional Success: Great progress is made or powerful resistance asserted. If the exceptional success concludes the casting of the ritual, then the victim suffers a –2 dice penalty to all Resolve-based rolls and –3 dice to any perception roll.
Curse of Shadows,
Doom Strike
Spirits are notoriously difficult to kill; even disregarding the fact that they reform when “killed” if they have any Essence remaining and the fact that they are normally intangible in the physical world. A spirit’s Traits often give it an extraordinarily high Defense, making it difficult to even land a blow on a spirit foe. Pack tactics and Willpower can help overcome this, but when a warrior must strike hard and strike fast, this Rite can tip the odds. By infusing a werewolf’s claws and fangs with Essence, the ritemaster creates a sympathetic connection between the recipient’s blows and her target’s flesh.

Performing the Rite: The recipient of the rite stands in the center of a stone circle (anything from a ring of pebbles to a megalithic circle of standing stones), holding a burning branch of dogwood in one hand. The ritemaster circles outside the ring, speaking exhortations to glory and victory in battle. At the completion of the rite, the ritemaster slashes her palm open with a talon or a sharp-edged rock and marks the recipient on the breast with his blood. This act infuses the recipient with Essence and activates the rite.

The ritemaster may perform this rite on himself.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals
Action: Extended (1–5 successes; the ritemaster chooses the target number at the start of the rite; each roll represents one turn)

Success: If the target number is reached, the recipient may spend a point of Essence as a reflexive action to allow her next attack against a spirit (within the same turn) to reduce the target’s Defense by a number equal to the number of successes earned on the activation roll. The recipient must attack with either claws or bite to benefit from this rite, and may invoke its effects a number of times equal to the number of successes on the activation roll.
Exceptional Success: If the ritemaster finishes with five or more extra successes, each invocation of this rite allows one attack to ignore the spirit’s Defense.
Doom Strike,
Rouse the Fetish
This rite allows an Uratha to communicate with the spirit of a fetish. It may be used to investigate the properties of a strange, newly won prize or to appease a fetish that is less than happy with its wielder.

Performing the Rite: Much like the binding rites, the Uratha first draws a circle around the urmagan with chalk or some other substance meaningful to the spirit bound into the fetish (if known). The ritualist surrounds this circle with claw sigils and chants softly as he focuses his will. Offerings of chiminage are also helpful, if the nature of the urmagan spirit is known.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual
Action: Extended (Eight successes; each roll represents five minutes)

Success: Successes are gathered. If eight or more are gained, the ritemaster makes contact, and can converse in a limited fashion. The spirit will reveal its nature, Rank and the purpose of the fetish.
Exceptional Success: The spirit is more forthcoming, and may relate details about its binding, past owners or other such information.

Modifier Situation
+2 Ritemaster knows spirit’s name.
+1 Ritemaster makes offering of chiminage.
–1 to –5 per dot of the fetish
Rouse the Fetish,
Echoes of Truth
The truth is a slippery thing. The old saw has it that every story has three sides: your side, the other guy’s side, and the truth. Ritualists have passed this rite from one to another for countless generations, as it remains one of the few reliable means of getting a fragment of the truth without relying on the fickle favor of the Elunim. It only shows a glimpse of what happened, a moment frozen in time like a photograph taken of the past — to the point where some irreverent Iron Masters call this rite “Polaroid Postcognition.” Often that glimpse is enough to reveal hidden details.

Performing the Rite: The ritemaster writes his query on a piece of blank paper or bark, in the First Tongue. The question always starts with the crucial words Duzag lal, “show me.” The question is then burned over a fire made with at least one piece of oak, and the ashes mixed into a bowl of dark ink that shows an image that answers the question.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals
Action: Extended (10 successes; each roll represents 10 minutes)

Success: A still image coalesces in the bowl that answers the werewolf’s request. The image is relevant to the question asked — a werewolf asking to see who stole his keys would see a still image of the moment someone picked his pocket, but if the pickpocket wore a disguise, the image won’t reveal his real face. The image revealed by this rite fades after ten seconds, and can’t be photographed or otherwise recorded.
Exceptional Success: The image reveals incidental details that give a lot away — the pickpocket in the above example had a distinctive tattoo. Rolls based off information gained from the image gain a +1 modifier.
Echoes of Truth,
Call Gaffling
This ritual, and it’s brother rite Call Jaggling are the core of the ritemaster’s repertoire. Though most spirits are inherently unfriendly towards werewolves, they must come if called, though they are not required to cooperate. Most spirits contest this ritual unless bribed with rich chiminage or threatened by binding.

Performing the Rite: This rite is relatively simple. The werewolf marks out a sacred circle and sits in the middle. She consumes a small amount of reality-expanding natural substance — a hallucinogen, stimulant or depressant, as per the ritualist’s traditions. She then places a few hundred grams of chiminage on the ground before her. While this is most often food of some kind appropriate to the spirit’s type, it can also be precious metal, gems or another substance. The greater the value of the chiminage, the more likely the Gaffling is to cooperate with the werewolf’s request.

The chiminage may be burned, buried or doused with water in order to bring it to the spirits’ attention. The ritualist then performs a howl of summons. A single Gaffling of the chosen type arrives within several minutes of the beginning of the rite if all goes well.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual versus the subject’s Resistance
Action Contested and Extended (40 successes, each roll is one minute.)

First to gather 40 successes is the victor. In the event of an Exceptional Success on any specific roll, all subsequent rolls by the opponent suffer a -1 penalty.

Suggested Modifiers
+2 Chiminage is very valuable to the spirit
[b]+1 Spirit is particularly disposed toward ritemaster’s tribe or auspice (an Elunim answering an Elodoth’s rite, a war-spirit answering a Rahu’s rite)
+1 Chiminage is particularly valuable to the spirit
+1 or more The werewolf outranks the spirit*
–1 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit
–3 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit from one mile away
–5 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit from 10 miles away
Call Gaffling,
Banish Spirit
This ritual forces a spirit in the material plane back through the Gauntlet and into the Shadow. It’s something of a brute-force ritual, as it’s painful for the spirits, but it’s an effective ‘goad’ for uncooperative entities.

Performing the Rite: The targeted spirit must be bound with the Bind Spirit rite or by physically preventing its host from moving more than a meter or two in any direction. The ritualist approaches the bound spirit and performs a brief snarl of exile and refusal, complete with similar gestures. The ritualist then slowly circles the bound spirit counterclockwise, and sprinkles it with salt water from each of the four cardinal directions.

The key of the ritual is the five-time repetition of the First Tongue phrase, “I banish you from this realm,” Galer za da sar. The ritualist doesn’t have to repeat the phrase five times in a row. He may sprinkle it throughout the performance, but the ritual isn’t complete until the phrase is said for a fifth time.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual versus the subject’s Resistance
Action Contested and Extended (10 successes, each roll is one minute.)

If the ritemaster reaches 10 successes first, the spirit is banished. If the spirit reaches it first, it stays put, and another attempt cannot be made by any werewolf/spirit mage to banish it for the next 24 hours.
Banish Spirit,
Shadow Conveyance
It’s a common feature of shamanic myths that when a shaman travels to the realm of spirits, he makes use of some sort of vehicle while there. It might be a dugout canoe, a chariot, or a spectral horse, or something more fanciful, but it serves to speed the shaman along his way. This rite allows an Ithaeur to craft such a conveyance for himself, using the Essence that infuses his spirit half.

Performing the Rite: The ritemaster first creates or acquires a small model of the vehicle she wishes to bring into being in the Shadow. This model can be anything from a hand-whittled carving of a dog sled to a die-cast toy car. The ritemaster prepares an ink made from nightshade, woundwort, and ayahuasca or a similar natural hallucinogen, with which he marks the model with glyphs representing the shadow. The model is, finally, destroyed, creating an echo in the Shadow bound to the Ithaeur.

A Shadow conveyance is not a spirit; it is merely a construct of ephemera. Even if the conveyance resembles a living being (and in the Shadow, that can be a broad category indeed), it is a mindless automaton; any resemblance to a real creature or its behaviors are purely cosmetic. The conveyance can only be piloted by the Ithaeur; for any other character the vessel simply refuses to move.

The Shadow conveyance has the following Traits: Durability 1, Size 5 (one passenger), Structure 5, Acceleration 10, Safe Speed 44 (30 mph), Maximum Speed 88 (60 mph), Handling 0. Vehicles are covered on pp. 141–147 of the World of Darkness Rulebook.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual
Action Extended (20 successes; each roll represents 10 minutes)

Success: Successes are gained. When the ritemaster completes the ritual, the Shadow conveyance is completed and will manifest near the character the next time he enters the Shadow. If the rite was performed in the Shadow, the conveyance appears immediately in the ritemaster’s vicinity. When he leaves the Shadow, the conveyance vanishes. The Shadow conveyance persists for one month.
Exceptional Success: Rapid progress is made. If the ritemaster completes the rite with five or more extra successes, the Shadow conveyance has the following Traits: Durability 4, Size 9 (four passengers), Structure 10, Acceleration 20, Safe Speed 88 (60 mph), Maximum Speed 161 (110 mph), Handling 2.
Shadow Conveyance,
Scarlet Messenger
This rite creates a short-lived spirit that can take a message to anyone, anywhere.

Performing the Rite: The ritemaster cuts open her flesh (usually a palm or forearm) and lets 33 droplets of blood drip onto the ground by her feet. At the end of this offering, the werewolf beseeches the blood to awaken and carry forth a single message, and speaks one sentence aloud — no more than 33 words – and names the person who is to be the recipient of the message. The werewolf need not know the person personally, but must at least know the recipient’s name.

The blood forms into a large raven-spirit, black-feathered but with red eyes and a scarlet cast to its plumage when the light catches at certain angles. It is not a true spirit, merely a simulacrum created by the ritual, but is capable of flight in the Shadow like a true raven-spirit, and can cross the Gauntlet to or from the physical world in order to deliver its message. When the raven-spirit arrives at the named person, it alights on their shoulder (regardless of witnesses or location) and caws loudly. The recipient of the message understands these caws perfectly, hearing the ritemaster’s message in the croaky sounds. The raven waits for 33 seconds to hear any reply to the message, which the raven will carry back to the ritemaster and deliver. If no reply is forthcoming in that time, or after the raven has delivered the message back to the ritemaster, the spirit lands on the ground and becomes nothing more than a small patch of the werewolf’s blood.

Cost: None
Action Extended (10 successes, each roll is one minute.) The werewolf takes 1B per roll.

When enough successes are reached, the raven-spirit takes a message of no more than 33 words to the recipient, travelling no further than 1 mile per success. Upon an ES, it may travel up to 2 miles per success. The raven-spirit may enter the Shadow, the Twilight, or the Hedge.

Suggested Modifiers
+1 Recipient is well-known to the ritemaster.
+1 Recipient has tasted the ritemaster’s blood.
-1 Recipient has never met the ritemaster.
Scarlet Messenger
3rd
Shadow Projection
Werewolves are naturally attuned to the Shadow and can enter it physically with relative ease. There are times, though, when bodily traveling into the spirit world is less than desirable, either because of danger or because a werewolf’s presence there would agitate the local spirits or alert a pack’s enemies. This rite, adapted from similar rituals employed by mortal shamans, allows a werewolf to project her consciousness from her body and into the Shadow in the guise of a wolf-spirit.

Performing the Rite: Seating herself in the middle of a ritual circle, the Ithaeur ingests a natural hallucinogen like peyote or agaric (this is largely a symbolic gesture as a werewolf’s metabolism quickly purges most drugs from her system) and beats out a quick, rhythmic tattoo on a drum, tom-tom, or even just her own thighs. As she attains a trance state, her spirit half slips loose from her physical body and crosses the Gauntlet, manifesting in the form of a wolf-spirit.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals
Action: Extended (20 successes; each roll represents 10 minutes)

While the werewolf is in the Shadow Realm in this form, she is treated as though she were in Urhan form for all purposes (including Trait modifiers, restrictions on actions or communication, and the like). However, spirits and other beings in the Shadow Realm perceive her as an ordinary wolf-spirit, not an Uratha. An opposed roll of Power (Wits + Occult for non-spirits) versus Wits + Primal Urge is required to see through the deception. Her Rank appears to be the same as her Renown grants her (see Werewolf: The Forsaken p. 272).

While projecting in this form, the werewolf is somewhat insulated from actual, physical damage. Any bashing or lethal damage inflicted on the character’s ephemeral body is recorded as bashing damage on her physical body, as bruises appear on her flesh. Aggravated damage inflicted on the werewolf’s ephemeral body appears on her physical body as lethal harm. If an ephemeral character is knocked unconscious by this damage, she automatically returns to her body.

The werewolf’s ephemeral body can move around normally in the Shadow Realm, walking and running at normal Speed. During the time she is mentally projected, the ritemaster’s body is alive but comatose and her soul has actually separated from the body. She has no way of knowing her body’s current state of health or any other information about it. Should her body die while psychically projected, she gradually loses her memories and sense of self over a number of days equal to 10 minus her Primal Urge. At the end of this time, she loses all recollection of herself and becomes a true wolf-spirit.

If the character’s ephemeral body is destroyed (her Health track is filled with aggravated damage), her
physical body lapses into a coma from which she never awakens.

This rite can only be performed at a locus. It lasts as long as the ritualist desires (but see the rules for deprivation on pp. 175–176 of the World of Darkness Rulebook). Ending the rite is a reflexive action, but the werewolf’s ephemeral form must be within the area of a locus (not necessarily the one her body is at).
Shadow Projection,
Information Gestalt
With this Ritual, the werewolf has developed an inner sight so powerful that it can actually catch glimpses of the future. The character enters a meditative trance, clearing her mind of everything but darkness in order to welcome the visions. She might receive warning of an impending attack, foretell the arrival of a potential ally or even watch a betrayal unfold before it happens. Viewing the future accurately is impossible, though. No vision is guaranteed to come true. Worse, visions gained are more often signs of ominous events than they are promises of good fortune. Whether this is because the Ritual’s “eyesight” is through a dark lens, or simply a cold reflection of the hard truths of a werewolf’s existence, none can say.

A seer is unaware of events surrounding her while she is in a trance. She is, however, aware of anything that touches or affects her body directly. A character may not attempt Information Gestalt more than once in any 24-hour period.

Performing the Ritual: The werewolf enters into a meditative trance while watching multiple television screens, all tuned to different channels.

Cost: 1E per success
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual
Action: Extended (15 successes required; each roll represents one minute spent in a trance)

Success: The character catches a glimpse of a potential event in her near future — anywhere from 24 hours to one week. The vision lasts for roughly a turn’s worth of viewing — enough time to watch a man gun down a packmate, a car carrying a loved one swerve and crash or an elder hail a dangerous spirit. The vision is usually clear enough to make out details, though the details might be misleading. For example, a body face-down in the river, wearing a packmate’s jacket, might turn out be the corpse of a friend who borrowed the jacket. This Gift is a means of gaining a potential warning, nothing more.
Exceptional Success: The vision lasts for up to a minute.
Information Gestalt,
Bind Spirit
It allows a werewolf to bind a spirit to a single location or to prevent a particular spirit from entering a single location. Bind Spirit is very common; most experienced Ithaeur know a variation of it. This same rite can be used to bind a spirit into a particular part of the Shadow or the physical world. As a result, the spirit cannot leave its immediate area, not even to cross the Gauntlet. Werewolves who know this rite can use it in a preparatory fashion for a spirit they haven’t yet summoned into the physical world, or against a spirit already manifest in the real world or against a spirit in the Shadow if the ritualist is already in the spirit world.

The ritualist must provide for a single means of escape from the bond, and he must express that means to at least two others — neither of whom have to be the bound spirit. The means of escape can be all but impossible, but it cannot be a true logical impossibility. Frequently, the means of escape is phrased as, “Once you perform the following task to the best of your ability, you will be free…” (e.g., “Once you successfully teach me the following Gift…”).

Performing the Rite: Werewolves know dozens of variations on this rite, and most experienced Ithaeur create their own versions, which they then pass on to students. The most common version — not an ancient one, but one that has become quite popular in the last few decades — requires the ritualist to draw a chalk circle around the fringes of a room or glade before summoning the spirit. Creating the circle requires 20 successes on an extended Intelligence + Occult roll. Each roll represents one minute of work. The circle is marked with dozens of Uratha claw-sigils, and a complex half-howling chant is performed before the spirit is summoned. Once the spirit has been summoned into the circle (via an appropriate rite, such as Summon Gaffling), the werewolf must complete the last notes of the howl before the spirit realizes what is going on and escapes.

To bind a spirit that is already present, the ritualist may be able to complete the aforementioned circle in secret. For example, a particularly clever werewolf might be able to convince a night-spirit that the circle he is drawing represents the spirit’s “star chart.” If that cannot be done — it isn’t likely, Luna knows — he must somehow wrap the rite’s subject three times in silvered thread (which is impossible to do in the material world) and then perform the aforementioned chant. That silvered thread can easily be broken until the third loop is complete. After that, it cannot be broken at all unless the ritualist makes a mistake in the chant. In the physical world, a spirit may be encircled by physically holding its host on the spot.

This rite doesn’t work on ghosts.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual versus the subject’s Resistance
Action Instanct (Once the circle is prepared)

If the most successes are rolled for the ritemaster. The spirit is successfully bound and cannot break free except under a few circumstances:
• If the ritualist that binds the spirit releases it with the phrase, “I release you” or its equivalent.
• If the binding circle is broken or the silver thread is snapped by an outside force.
• The ritemaster must designate one other way that the spirit can be freed, and he must express this method to at
least two other entities within an hour of the spirit’s binding. One of those two may be the spirit, but it doesn’t have to be.

Upon an Exceptional Success, the ritemaster may also strip 1 Essence from the spirit and use it to replenish his own pool.
Bind Spirit,
Bind Human

There are two main functions to this rite: to secure a location against unwanted human intrusion and to bind a human to a particular location. Neither variant ritual is entirely foolproof even against a human who knows no magic. Humans aren’t bound by bans as spirits are, and their actions simply cannot be as constrained as spirits’ can be.

When this rite is used to bind a person to a given location, the ritemaster must provide for a single means of escape from the bond, and he must express that means to at least two others — neither of whom have to be the bound mortal. The means of escape can be all but impossible, but it cannot be a true logical impossibility. Usually, the means of escape is phrased as, “Once you have accomplished this task for me, you may depart.”

When used to secure a location against mortal intrusion, no “password” is required, although the ritemaster may choose to nominate a specific action that allows a human to pass through normally. For example, a werewolf might set up a ward that bars all humans save those who carry a crow feather somewhere on their person, and then gives a crow feather to his wolf-blooded lover in the event that she needs to reach him.

The ward isn’t directly evident save when a human attempts to cross it. The human feels a faint nausea, a headache, a sense of vertigo or even a combination of such unpleasant sensations. The subject is unable to step beyond the area unless he successfully resists the ward’s effects.

Performing the Rite: To secure an area against mortal intrusion, the werewolf takes a form that has claws and uses them to draw a series of sigils (using a muddy mixture of water and ash) on every path of entry into the area. In a built structure, this includes doors and windows. Outdoors, the sigils are repeated every few meters to form a rough boundary around the area.

To keep a mortal bound in an area, the werewolf uses his claws and a muddy mixture of earth and water, but this time he must clearly mark out the precise boundaries of the area, putting the sigils on the inside of the boundary.

In either case, the affected area cannot be larger than a radius of 50 yards. A werewolf may typically use this ritual to bind a human inside a house or within a campsite, or to ward a small building.

Cost: None
Action: Extended (20 successes, each roll is ten minutes)

The first time the mortal attempts to pass, a Resolve + Occult roll is made at a penalty equal to half the ritemaster’s Harmony (rounded up). One die is added to this roll for ghouls and other supernatural humans. Mages may add their appropriate resistance trait as usual. Vampires, Ridden and other supernatural creatures that are no longer human are immune to the rite’s effects. The roll made for the human may gain one to three dice if the stated terms of passing are directly against the mortal’s moral code, although no dice are gained if the terms are merely unpleasant. “You may not leave until you have deleted all the files you possess that mention us, from whatever secure location they might be” provides no bonus dice, while “You may not leave until you kill your infant son” does. If the roll for the mortal succeeds, he’s free. Otherwise he cannot try to escape again for another hour (and he can try again every hour after that, if he keeps failing). When the mortal tries again, he receives a cumulative –1 penalty for every attempt after the first (though this penalty can never exceed –5).

A binding typically lasts for 24 hours, although Essence may be spent for the ritemaster to increase the duration. Each point increases the binding’s duration for another 24 hours. The ritemaster may dismiss the binding as an instant action by erasing a portion of the boundary with a claw.
Bind Human,
Call Jaggling
This rite is a more powerful version of Call Gaffling. Jagglings are more independent and powerful spirits than Gafflings, and are more likely to resist the sweet summons of chiminage. And yet, a Jaggling servant — even a temporary one — is a valuable tool for any werewolf, so this ritual is a valued tool among Ithaeur.

Performing the Rite: This rite is very similar to Call Gaffling, but the ritualist must provide richer chiminage, and his howl of summons must be customized to the type of Jaggling he wishes to summon. A common howl of summoning doesn’t suffice. If the werewolf wants a stag-spirit, he must howl a specific call to the Children of Stag. The rite takes around several minutes to perform.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual versus the subject’s Resistance
Action Contested and Extended (50 successes, each roll is one minute.)

First to gather 50 successes is the victor. In the event of an Exceptional Success on any specific roll, all subsequent rolls by the opponent suffer a -1 penalty.

Suggested Modifiers
+2 Chiminage is very valuable to the spirit
[b]+1 Spirit is particularly disposed toward ritemaster’s tribe or auspice (an Elunim answering an Elodoth’s rite, a war-spirit answering a Rahu’s rite)
+1 Chiminage is particularly valuable to the spirit
+1 or more The werewolf outranks the spirit*
–1 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit
–3 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit from one mile away
–5 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit from 10 miles away
Call Jaggling,
Grave’s Bounty
This ritual allows Rakesh to consume the spiritual resonance of a grave, and gain essence for it.

Performing the Rite: The werewolf sits in front of the grave, lays a palm on the monument and makes a silent invocation to Death Wolf. She also thanks the person who lies there interred (it is customary to lay flowers on the grave at some point
in the future, but this isn’t required for the rite). The werewolf then scrapes a bit of dust or dirt from the headstone and places the dirt under her tongue. If the rite works, she feels a sudden influx of emotion — grief, pain, loss and even joy, depending on what sorts of emotions the monument has absorbed.

The werewolf can attempt this rite more than once in the same night in the same graveyard, but this carries some serious risks (see below).

Cost: None
Action: Instant

Upon a success, the werewolf gains a number of Essence points equal to the successes the player rolled. She can try to gain more Essence by performing the rite on a different headstone, but she runs the risk of offending the spirit of the graveyard. For every successful attempt at this rite after the first, the player rolls Manipulation + Occult. If this roll fails, the graveyard-spirit attacks the werewolf’s Essence directly, turning it into caustic, black nothingness. The character suffers one point of aggravated damage per point of Essence she has gained from this rite while in that particular graveyard on that night.

Suggested Modifiers
+2 The character attended the funeral of the person interred in the grave
+1 The grave has flowers laid during that day (by someone who know the deceased personally).
+1 For every dot of the Fame rating the deceased had at the time of death.
-1 The deceased has been dead for more than 5 years.
–2 The deceased has been dead for more than 10 years.
–3 The deceased has been dead for more than 20 years.
–4 The deceased has been dead for more than 50 years.
–5 The deceased has been dead for more than 100 years.
Rite of Grave’s Bounty,
Wake the Spirit
According to werewolf lore, everything has a spirit. Every object, every idea, everything has a spirit, down to the barest sliver of a thought or a single-celled organism. But though there are many spirits active in the world, the great majority are ‘dormant’, but with this rite they can be awoken, ‘summoning’ a new spirit into existence.

Waking a spirit can be a dangerous gamble, as the newly awakened spirit feels no obligation or gratitude to the ritemaster. A spirit that’s been awakened by this rite acts according to its nature — no more, no less. A werewolf might be able to convince the newly awakened spirit of a car to give its earthly analogue a measure of its power simply for the ecstasy of racing at high speeds, but an awakened flame-spirit might be as dangerous to the werewolf as to her enemies. Yet awakening a spirit gives a werewolf a new potential resource from which to draw. A werewolf can awaken the spirit of a murder weapon to question the spirit about its former owner, for instance.

Performing the Rite: The ritemaster drums, chants, dances or performs some other form of rhythmic noise and motion as she moves about the object or place to be awakened. The culmination of the rite is a loud howl, which is meant to shake the spirit free of sleep.

Cost: None
Action Extended (15 successes, each roll is one minute.)

When 15 or more are accumulated and the rite is performed on a mundane item or place, it wakes the potential spirit within. The item then possesses a spirit analogue in the Shadow Realm.

When performed on an animal, this ritual “wakes” a Gaffling related to that animal in the spirit world. The Gaffling isn’t directly connected to the animal in question, though, and it doesn’t have to remain in the animal’s area. For example, performing the rite on a Doberman pinscher wakes a dog-spirit that might not necessarily look like a Doberman.

A newly awakened spirit is always a Rank 1 Gaffling with average traits for its class (see p. 279). The rite cannot be performed on sentient creatures such as humans, or on objects or animals that already have awakened spirits associated with them. The ritemaster gains a +1 to all rolls to influence the newly woken spirit, including Gifts and rites, for the duration of the scene in which this rite is performed. Although the spirit doesn’t always show gratitude, it’s usually slightly suggestible for the first few hours of its existence.
Wake the Spirit
4th
Long, complex ritual, but the relevant bit is that Rakesh can make fetishes at the XP normal cost.
Fetish Rite,
Power in Words
Uratha in the Lodge of Words know the power of the root of language, and can focus the richness and diversity of words themselves to a greater purpose. Therefore, Power in Words remains one of the Modernists’ most powerful tools, not because of the rite’s raw might but because of its seemingly infinite versatility in a myriad of situations (just as language itself, the Modernists argue).

Performing the Rite: To perform this rite, the ritualist pricks his finger and writes a single verb on a piece of parchment, paper or something similar, and then swallows that piece of paper — in essence, making the word “part” of him. During this time, the ritualist also repeats that word over and over in his mind (and aloud, if he wishes), making it a nonstop mantra. Since speed can often be of the essence when forming this rite, many Modernists who make frequent use of Power in Words will keep their thumbnail pointed and sharpened, so they can prick their index finger at will.

Cost: 1 Essence
Action Instant

Success: By invoking this rite, the Uratha declares a concept using a single verb (such as “attack” or “research”). For the duration of the scene, the werewolf invokes the power behind that word, channeling energy off it and related verbs by saying them aloud. Each verb or verb phrase so invoked gives a bonus to one action; this bonus depends on the relationship between the original word and the new one.

+3 Direct synonym (the relationship between “hit” and “punch”)
+2 Closely related (the relationship between “attack” and “kick”)
+1 Tangentially related (the relationship between “kick” and “punch”)

Using words that are completely unrelated (such as the relationship between “toss” and “punch”) or not verbs (“aggression”) will not bestow any bonus. Each word can only be used once with an activation of the rite. Verb phrases can be used, provided none of the words have been used previously for the activation of the rite (for example, “sucker-punch” could be a closely related synonym to “attack,” but the Uratha could not later on use “punch” or “sucker-hit”). The verb used to activate Power in Words is merely a reference point and does not provide any bonus.

For example, Slade Names-the-Darkness is looking for clues at a crime scene and he invokes Power in Words, declaring “investigate.” Each Investigation check takes 10 minutes, and Slade will be spending one hour searching the crime scene (six rolls). Slade utters “search” as the first synonym; the Storyteller rules this is a direct synonym and grants a +3 bonus to that check. Ten minutes later, Slade says, “seek”; this grants a +3 bonus to that check. For the four remaining checks Slade uses “look,” “comb,” “peer” and “sift,” granting +3, +1, +2 and +0 to the remaining rolls.

Although invoked words don’t need to be shouted, they do need to be said at a conversational level, and the Uratha must be able to speak to utilize this rite. Only one version of this rite may be active for a werewolf during a scene.
Exceptional Success: The rite lasts the duration of the scene or until the next sunrise or sunset, whichever is longer.
Power in Words,
Obon Temae
This rite, based somewhat on the Japanese tea-drinking “tray ceremony,” allows a werewolf to force a single yokai to sit with her for a time. The two share ritually-prepared food or drink, and neither can commit violence against the other during that time (provided, of course, the ritual was successful). This ritual also forces the spirit to communicate certain information to the ritemaster. The type of information and story that the spirit must deliver is based upon the type of food chosen for the ritual — and only one type of victual or drink is allowed per ceremony (see below for the types of meal and what they demand a spirit do). The ritual is certainly not foolproof; it doesn’t guarantee concrete answers, but it does force a being to calm itself for a time, and may allow a werewolf just enough opportunity to learn more about the entity, and earn its trust over time.

Performing the Rite: This ritual has two steps. The first step is the preparation of the meal. Each meal requires an extended Intelligence + Occult roll to prepare. Twenty successes are required for each, with each roll taking one minute’s worth of time. A single “meal” consists of an individual item: for instance, one blood-filled, sticky rice cake (ketsueki daifuku) counts as one meal and requires 20 successes to create. One point of Essence is also required for each meal.

These meals can be made ahead of time, and last for a full week before rotting or decaying. They can also be carried through to the Shadow from the physical world; crossing the Gauntlet with one or many meals for the ceremony, however, incurs a –1 (non-cumulative) penalty to the roll for stepping sideways. The ritemaster can prepare five different common types of meal for the yokai (though more are said to exist). The meals and their effects upon spirits are as follows:

Ketsueki Daifuku: This is a round or square mochi (glutinous rice cake) filled with blood (the ritemaster’s own). For every cake given to a spirit, the spirit must answer one question about what it eats (what it likes to eat, hates to eat, bad things it has consumed, other spirits it has swallowed, etc.).
Sukin Dango: This dumpling (made of mochiko or rice flour) is steamed or fried and stuffed with some of the ritemaster’s own skin and meat. Many ritemasters use their teeth or a knife to get the golf ball-sized hunk of flesh necessary to fill the dough. For every dumpling given to a yokai, the being must answer one question about who it has spoken with over the last 24 hours. (The werewolf may ask who the creature has spoken with, what topics were discussed and the time and places of such conversations.)
Koicha Chishio: This “thick” tea is a syrupy beverage flavored with three drops of the ritemaster’s blood and some of her saliva. The tea can be served in bowls or glasses. For every serving of tea, the ritemaster may ask the spirit a question about its powers (what it is capable of, how often, if it has used its abilities recently, what Gifts it can teach, etc.).
Sakana no Ikizukuri: This is a five-to-ten-inch fish stuck with two skewers (often made of bamboo). The ritemaster must pluck one of his own teeth from his mouth and stuff it into the belly of the fish. The fish is not cooked (and is often served alive). The yokai must answer one question (per fish served) about spirit politics. (The werewolf may ask about power blocs, choirs, rivalries and rank.)
Pa-Ji Basashi: The ritemaster marinates raw horsemeat briefly in a bowl of her own bile (she must make herself throw up if necessary). With each of these delicacies, the ritemaster may ask one question pertaining to a location in the Shadow (the location of a loci, of the suspected location of another spirit, the direction toward a specific locale or even where other Forsaken went).

The second part of the ritual is invoking it against an individual yokai. This ability works on spirits, Ridden, Hosts and ghosts. (It does not work on vampires, mages or other oni.) When invoking the ritual, the ritemaster merely needs to bring out the food and set one of the meals down before the creature.
Obon

Cost: 1 Essence per "meal" prepared
Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals vs. Resistance (or Resolve+Supernatural Advantage); Apply Rank differences
Action Instant (once food has been prepared)

Success: The yokai is bound to a 10-yard radius around the meal laid out by the ritemaster. The ritemaster must stay within 10 yards of the meal, as well, or the ritual ends.

The ritemaster may, as noted above, ask one question per meal served. Only one type of meal may be served during this ceremony. In other words, the ritemaster may not lay down a rice cake and then follow it up with a bowl of tea. Bringing new food means she must perform the ritual anew (making the Harmony+Ritual roll against the yokai’s Resistance). (Note that any of the questions asked will be answered honestly by the spirit — but honesty does not imply accuracy. The spirit may have incorrect information, and will pass that misinformation along as gospel truth.) The spirit is bound to the area for one hour per meal. The ritemaster may only put down one meal (and ask one question) per hour.

The spirit does not necessarily need to eat the meal (though many do). The ritemaster, similarly, does not need to consume any of the prepared food or drink. The food must only be present. At the end of the hour, whatever is left of a single meal collapses into mold and dust.

If at any time the ritemaster decides to leave the 10-yard radius around the meal, the ritual ends. Also, the ritemaster may not bring violence against the entity targeted by the rite. Doing so costs a Willpower point (while the ritual remains active), and also ends the ritual prematurely.

Exceptional Success: The most successes (five or more) are rolled for the ritemaster. The werewolf may ask one additional question per meal (two total per meal).
Temae,
Rite of the Shadowed Hunt
This rite allows a werewolf to open a gateway into the Underworld.

Performing the Rite: This rite can only be performed at an Avernian Gate, or at a locus with an appropriately death-like resonance. The ritemaster stands before the gate or locus, and makes an offering to Death Wolf. This offering must involve a living sacrifice, but any living creature, even a mouse, will do. The werewolf then draws the First Tongue sigils for “death” and “crossing” in the victim’s blood, and sits in silence until the gate opens.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals
Action Extended (20 successes needed; each roll requires one minute of meditation)

Success: Successes are added to the total. If the player reaches 20 successes, the gateway opens to the Underworld, and remains open for one hour per dot of the ritemaster’s Harmony. It cannot be closed early, and once open it admits anyone to the Underworld.

Exceptional Success: Considerable successes are added to the total. If the ritemaster concludes the rite with an exceptional success, Luna sees the rite in progress but acknowledges that it must be so. She sends a Lune to watch the gate and make sure no one but the pack members (and any allies they designate) enter it.
Rite of the Shadowed Hunt,
Rite of Slaying the Truth
Some secrets should remain secret. But information, the Bone Shadows note, seeks to flow into places of lesser concentration. This means that people seem to have a way of learning things that they shouldn't, and sometimes it rankles the werewolves’ consciences that someone who learned a truth that they cannot be allowed to possess should die for it. This is especially true if the offending person isn’t a scholar or an investigator, but just a normal human who picked up the wrong book or turned down the wrong path.

Performing the Rite: The target needs to be present and unconscious for this rite to work. Normally, the Uratha drug the target or abduct him while he sleeps. The ritualist and any assistants have to work in complete silence — even a cough will disrupt the rite. They surround the sleeping target and trace glyphs in the air above his body, and then release a small insect onto his skin. The insect becomes infused with the power of the rite, buries into the target’s ear and poisons the spirit of the targeted memory. The spirit then dies and is absorbed into the target’s body. The target awakens a few hours later, but has no recollection of whatever event or knowledge the werewolf removed. Of course, the werewolves need to make sure that the target doesn't simply relearn the secret.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals vs. Resolve+Composure
Action Extended and Contested (30 successes; each roll represents five minutes)

Success: Progress is made toward the goal. If the ritualist reaches 30 successes before the target, the spirit-insect kills the spirit-memory, the information disappears and the target awakens in the morning feeling confused but otherwise intact.

Exceptional Success: Significant progress is made toward the goal. If the ritualist reaches the goal with 35+ successes, the target “smoothes out” his own memory. The information disappears, but the target has no lost time, holes in events or incongruous recollections that would tip him off that something is wrong.

Modifier Situation
+3 Subject already suffers from amnesia of some time.
+1 Ritualist has a Medicine Specialty in Neurology.
–1 Subject has never seen the ritualist’s face.
–3 Ritualist does not possess the Medicine Skill.
Rite of Slaying the Truth,
Shadow Play
This costly rite calls upon the reflection of a loca-tion to replay a portion of its spiritual lifespan. With this rite, ritualists can often learn of events or times when a particular place had a different resonance or of tragedies that occurred there in the past. Though the rite has the power to reach back for centuries, it levies a terrible cost to do so. Because of the allegorical nature of the Shadow, it doesn’t give definitive answers to questions like, who burned down the old Phillips house? Such a question would be answered only if the arsonists somehow struck from the Shadow — such as using a fire elemental to com-mit the crime from the other side of the Gauntlet — and, even then, only the fire elemental might be revealed. What the rite does show is how the place’s reflection has changed over time in the Shadow.

Performing the Rite: The performance of this rite must take place in the reflection of a location in the Shad-ow. The ritualist first demarks the boundary of the area she wishes to perform the shadow play for her — leaving chiminage to the local spirits at key points. Then she per-forms a ritual howl and lapses into a trance. While others in the spirit world begin to see strange bands of distortion, they do not see the shadow play itself — the vision is only granted to the ritualist.

Cost: 1E per success
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual
Action: Extended (1 to 100 successes, depending on Essence spent). Each roll represents five minutes.

Success: Successes are gained. Each success allows the ritualist to replay five years of change in roughly five minutes at the cost of one Essence. This is not like a CD playback in which the user has full control to stop, start, search and pause the shadow play once it starts. While she can attempt to search for particularly significant events (ones that would have generated Essence flavored with a particular resonance, for example), it is very difficult to control precisely.
Exceptional Success: An exceptional success replays 50 years of past occurrences for merely one Essence.

Modifier Situation
+2 Chiminage is very valuable to local spirits and/ or connected to the events the ritemaster is interested in.
+1 The area has some connection to the ritemaster, such as within her territory.
+1 The area has a particularly strong reflection in the spirit world.
+1 The ritualist is a Cahalith.
+1 Chiminage is valuable to local spirits.
+0 The area is equivalent to a large room.
–1 The area is equivalent to a house.
–2 The ritemaster is attempting to locate a particular event.
–2 The area is equivalent to a building.
–4 The area is equivalent to a city block.
Shadow Play
Essence:
Pledges:

Attacks.............................Damage.....Dice Pool.....Special
Bite (Primal Form)................. 2(L)............ 15………8-Again, Hone Rage

Background: Everyone needs a hobby. Rakesh Morgan's hobby just so happens to involve being chased by death-spirits through abandoned houses near London on a regular basis.

It began in high school. Rakesh was always one of the 'weird kids', a lonely, quiet boy with all the charisma and force-of-personality of a baby rabbit. He sat in the back, rarely spoke up in class, and made no friends. Even the bullies eventually left him alone, after learning that the scrawny, weedy kid was capable of fighting with a wild abandon, on one notable instance having to be pulled off another child.

It didn't help that Rakesh was also smart, as in near-genius. His parents, a Welsh construction worker and a British Indian waitress, failed to understand his proclivities completely. His father would take him to see the football game, Rakesh would only dream of when he could get home and do something interesting, like read a book. Books were Rakesh's only friends for most of his childhood. And what books they were, the grimmer and darker the better. For somewhere in Rakesh there was a morbid streak a mile long, the product of an upbringing in which meaningful human contact was difficult.

By the time he was accepted into King's College London on a scholarship, Rakesh had taken to haunting the British Museum and other prominent libraries. He read The Witch-Cult in Western Europe by the anthropologist Dr. Margaret Murray, and Aleister Crowley's The Book of Lies. Occult and peculiar history was his hobby, something mystical and exciting to get away from an otherwise humdrum existence.

King's College was the young man's saving grace. His intellect was for once appreciated, and pretty soon Rakesh was heavily enrolled in the anthropology and social history courses. He completed a Bachelors and began to work towards a Masters in Anthropology, and after several summers of volunteering and working part-time for the National Trust, Rakesh had a job lined up with them after he graduated. In short, everything was finally beginning to look up.

Then came the First Change. At first, Rakesh thought he was going mad. He would walk to the Tube station and spot Ankou, the proto-Grim Reaper of the Breton myths, standing behind a sickly-looking girl on the train. He'd gaze out across the street from his apartment window, and on a distant branch is an owl the size of a man, with skulls emblazoned on its feathers. For most werewolves, the First Change is a whirlwind of confusion and ignorance, but for Rakesh, it was a flood of nightmarish understanding. He saw things he'd only read about, things which were not, could not be real.

But if they weren't, then what was he seeing? Had the world gone mad, or just Rakesh Morgan?

It was on a snowy night in January. The crescent moon was high in the night sky, and Rakesh was trudging home after a long day of studying. When Rakesh looked up to check the color of a light, he was confronted with a horseman in archaic armor, clutching a spear that dripped spectral blood. Rakesh backed away, turned and ran from this hideous apparition, only to find a great black dog, the size of a pony, blocking the way behind him. Rakesh thought true madness was here, and he ran again, but each way he turned, but the death spirits that had hovered near Rakesh for so many years were not so easily dissuaded. Again Rakesh was blocked, and once more, and then something... snapped.

Rakesh's was not a happy change, but few are. When the local Forsaken finally found him, some hours later, he was in a cemetery, smashing headstones with one might blow after another. They took him in and calmed him down, and from that day forward, Rakesh Morgan became one of the Forsaken. After his First Change display, there really wasn't any question of tribe. Rakesh was one of the Bone Shadows, as ordained a choice as could be imagined.

In a way, Rakesh was fortunate. Though the First Change would haunt his nightmares for years afterwards, it did not touch his family and friends. Rakesh may have thought he was going insane, but he was a private man, and kept it to himself. When the First Change occurred, it was far away from home or work, and though Rakesh committed several thousand euros worth of vandalism and a fair bit of desecration, there was no blood on his claws. The fact that Rakesh periodically woke up in a cold sweat, sure that Ankou was coming for him, seemed a small price to pay.

Since then, Rakesh has somehow managed to maintain both his life as Rakesh Morgan and Rakesh Shade-Chosen, largely by means of having lots of luck, a mental detachment that can periodically border on the sociopathic, and the fact that he is just really unimpressive. As Rakesh Morgan, he finished his masters degree in anthropology, and went to work for the National Trust, a British charity organization concerned with the historical preservation of old buildings and

otherwise culturally or ecologically significant locations. Rakesh was their man to find such places, evaluate them on their historical worthiness (the National Trust, though a very wealthy charity by most standards, still does not have unlimited resources), and make plans for restoration and preservation.

At the same time, Rakesh Shade-Chosen is the local pack brainiac and budding ritemaster. In his quiet and unnoticed way, Rakesh has settled into the local pack, and has set himself the personal task of learning everything about the spirit world that can possibly be known. Already, it's generally admitted that when it comes to spirit-lore, Rakesh is as good as some Ithaeur close to twice his age. Moreover, the scrawny fellow is also pretty good to have in a brawl, fighting in a manner more reminiscent of a rabid weasel than a full werewolf. Not particularly glorious, pretty effective.

What few realize is that Rakesh's skill at understanding the spirit-world is in large part a result of his anthropological training. Rakesh applies the rigors of modern research techniques to the legends of the Uratha, and though Rakesh admits that he'll never become a true anthropologist (at least, not unless he snags another scholarship), he can put it to pretty good work cataloguing the world of the Shadow. Of course, there's a downside. Treating the Uratha as research subjects has zisassociated Rakesh from them, and though he knows in his brain that he is one of them, in his heart he's still Rakesh Morgan, not Rakesh Shade-Chosen. This is a problem that probably only age and experience will rectify, though its unlikely that Rakesh will ever ascend to the heights of Harmony.

Recently, Rakesh was fired from his job from the National Trust after he was caught grave-robbing, and these days he runs an antique store and website, www.Morganantiques.com, which is enough to let him eat regularly.

Personality

On first impression, Rakesh is a weed. On second impression, Rakesh is a slightly creepy weed. All his life, Rakesh has been an unprepossessing person, a mild-mannered young man with a nervous smile and a soft voice. It wasn't that people disliked Rakesh, they just tended to ignore him and forget him. Since the First Change, to this naturally unimpressive exterior has been added a slight edge, like that of a wolf on the prowl, an aura of barely suppressed violence that most people find unnerving. Considering that he's also a half-Indian man in War on Terror era London, and Rakesh gets asked for his passport and subjected to more than his share of searches, despite the fact that his accent is purest London. Still, to those who know him, Rakesh seems a mild and unassuming man.

This is rubbish. Behind Rakesh's forgettable facade lies a formidable and rather bitter intellect. The companionship of King's College, the National Trust, and the Uratha hasn't quite worn away the bitter misanthropy that emerged during Rakesh's school days, when he felt himself the sole man of the mind amongst a sea of dumb brutes. Though much softer and more pleasant than he used to be, Rakesh still has a streak of misanthropy in him that leads him to expect the worst of people. Had circumstances been not too different, Rakesh could've been one of the spree-shooters one reads about in the Telegraph.

As is, Rakesh's impressive mind and simmering resentment towards humanity is sublimated into an interest in the ghoulish and macabre. He finds it weirdly pleasant and relaxing, reading up the latest research on the Thuggee cult of pre-British India in the British Museum. Mostly, Rakesh keeps his interest under his hat, having realized that discussions of the etymology of the Arabian Ghul is not particularly socially acceptable.

Finally, Rakesh is also very stubborn, and very much a scrapper. When confronted with a problem, Rakesh rarely backs down, attacking it from multiple angles until it falls. When the problem happens to be a recalcitrant spirit-ridden, the 'attacking' just happens to be more literal. Rakesh isn't the strongest or the fastest werewolf around, but he's tough and he doesn't back down, which makes him rather useful in a fight. And he is, after all, a werewolf.

Degeneration Roll for Rakesh -- Revelation of Werewolf Existence to Deborah Church

Dice Roll: 5d10s8e
d10 Results: 7, 1, 4, 2, 3 (Total Successes = 0)
- Failure, Rakesh's Harmony drops to 5.

Derangement Roll!

Dice Roll: 5d10s8e
d10 Results: 3, 8, 2, 5, 6 (Total Successes = 1)

Character Sheet

Tribe Bone Shadows Lodge: Lodge of the Modernists
Auspice Ithaeur—The Crescent Moon, Aspect Isibiluda—The Ritualist

Mental Attributes: Intelligence 6, Wits
4+Salmon Charm to all rolls
6, Resolve 3
Physical Attributes:
Reflexive Action, take 1L to boost by 2 for the Scene
Strength 3 (4+1/6+2/5+1/3+1/7+2), Dexterity 3 (3/4/5/5/5), Stamina 4 (5/6/6/5/8)
Social Attributes
-3 penalty to social rolls when dealing with humans, except for Intimidation
: Presence 1, Manipulation 2, Composure
4+Totem
5

Mental Skills
-3 untrained
: Academics (Anthropology, Research) •••••, Computer •••, Crafts ••••, Investigation •••••, Medicine •••, Occult (Necromancy, Secret Societies)
5+Totem
••••••, Politics •, Science ••••
Physical Skills
-1 untrained
: Athletics •••, Brawl (Bite) ••••, Stealth ••••, Survival (Shapeshifting) ••••
Social Skills
-1 untrained
: Animal Ken •, Expression •, Intimidation (Death Glare) ••••, Subterfuge (Hiding Emotions) ••••

Merits:
May ignore up to (Resolve) in stress-related penalties
Emotional Detachment •,
+2 to Initiative
Fast Reflexes ••, Languages (Chinese, Welsh; Native is English) ••, Language (First Tongue) •,
30 XP for the 5-dot merit, gaining 15 Totem points, plus an additional 15 XP to gain 5 more; Boons +1 Composure, +1 Occult (both factored into the above), +14 Essence per Story
Personal Totem (Shadow-in-Graves) (Special),
Not Much
Resources ••,
Free New ID •, May purchase Tokens
Shadow Cult Initiation (Harbingers) •••,
Fake set of papers in the name of someone or other
New ID •,
+2 to Stamina to resist the effects of drugs, poisons, or chemicals. Painkillers and anaesthetics are only half as effective as usual, and it is very hard to get drunk or high.
Toxin Resistance ••,
Lair: The Russell House; Size •••, Library (Necromancy, Occult History of London, TBD) •••, Ritual Area (Uratha Rites) ••, Security ••,
A 2-dot locus that is also mobile; takes the form of a man-sized steamer trunk with numerous scratchmarks on the inside of the lid.
Mobile Locus (The Steamer Trunk) •••
Fetishes
Unless stated otherwise, all Fetishes are activated as an Instant Action Harmony Roll, penalized by the Fetish's rating (activates on a success), or guaranteed activation for 1 Essence at successes=Primal Urge (4)
:
+2 to Wits (technically activated for the scene, but it’s free activation so Rakesh is assumed to have it always activated), and Rakesh gets the Mighty Bound Gift (see later)
Salmon Charm ••••,
Causes all visual or audio recording devices within a 100-yard radius to register only static. Lasts for a half hour, or until Rakesh decides to let them turn on.
Off-Switch Tattoo ••••,
This bag holds more on the inside than on the outside. It can hold up to 64 feet of cubic volume (a 4x4x4 foot volume) and unlimited weight, and weigh no more than an empty bag when closed. Unless activated, it actually is an empty bag, and thus the objects inside cannot be spotted by means of mundane investigation.
Traveller's Blanket •••• (Takes the form of a small doctor's bag),
Reflexive Action, take 1L of damage, gain +2 Strength for the scene.
Woad Tattoo •••,
When activated, everyone except the user rolls Stamina+Composure at a -8 penalty. On an ES, the listeners suffer no ill effects. On a success, they take a -3 to all rolls involving hearing for the rest of the scene. On a failure, the listener loses Willpower, Essence, or takes Lethal damage in any combination equal to the fetish-user’s successes, listener’s choice. On a dramatic failure, the listener takes 4 aggravated damage. After usage, Death Wolf’s Howl has to be recharged by howling into it and letting it sit in darkness for three days.
Death Wolf’s Howl •••,
Reflexive Activation, +2 to Speed, +2 to Jumping rolls for 21 turns; May be activated once per scene
Vermin's Flight Necklace ••,
The werewolf does a reading, and at some future point, when he recognizes an element from the reading, he may ‘cash it in’ to get either +3 to a roll or to regain a point of willpower.
Shadow Tarot ••,
Rakesh actually has three charms, each one with a different effect, and each one activating on a Reflexive action.

• One adds +3 to his initiative.
• One adds +1 to his defense for a number of rounds equal to successes on the activation roll / his Primal Urge if essence was spent.
• One, if Rakesh spends 1 Essence, grants him 9-again on a single, instant-action roll.
Protective Charm • (x3),
Each Talen can only be used once per adventure, but Rakesh makes more by the next adventure.

• Decay Dust x1 = decays an inanimate corpse into dust.
• Footsteps of the Dead x2 = dust which spreads over a 20 square foot area, and adheres to the footprints of any vampire or other walking dead that passed by in the last 24 hours.
• Myalarm x1 = if anything is taken from Rakesh's person without his permission, this plain beaded-leather bracelet unties and falls off, alerting him.
• Keep-Your-Distance x2 = A small leather bag, Rakesh can use it as part of a brawl attack instead of dealing damage (this attack ignores armor). The person is pushed back three yards per success on the attack roll, and must make a Dexterity+Athletics roll, -1 per success on the attack roll to avoid falling prone. Hitting something stops you from moving, but inflicts 1B or 1L depending on what you hit.
• Ghost Salt x2 = If sprinkled on an area, this salt glows faintly if there is a ghost present. More interestingly, it also glows if brought into contact with a ghost's anchor, or a possessed person.
• Obituary x1 = A piece of paper. If a deceased person's name is written down upon it, an obituary appears upon the paper. It states the deceased’s age at the time of death, the cause of death and any surviving family that he had (though not their locations), and keeps this information permanently.
Talens,
Crafted from the skin of alpha wolves by members of the Predator Kings, this rather crudely stitched cape of wolfskin makes the alternate forms of the Uratha even more formidable. When the wearer is shapeshifting, the cape molds itself to the new form of the werewolf. The Dalu form is given a thick mane of hair, while Gauru and Urshul have a dark fringe that stands up along the spine. This fetish is powered by an ancestor-spirit of the Predator Kings. Upon activation, the fetish grants a potent boost to the Physical Attributes of its wearer; the bonuses last for one minute per success on the activation roll. However, while the Alphaskin’s blessing is in effect, so is its curse; the wearer suffers a –1 penalty to all degeneration rolls.
• Dalu: +1 Strength
• Gauru: +2 Strength
• Urshul: +1 Strength, + 1 Size, +1 Speed, +1 Health
• Urhan: +1 Strength, +1 Size, +2 Speed, +1 Health
Durability 2 (reinforced to 7), Size 3, Structure 10
Action: Reflexive
Alphaskin •••••

Primal Urge: •••••••
Essence:
Essence (1) – Activate a Fetish without need for a roll
Essence (1) – Change form as a reflexive action, without need for a roll
Essence (1) – Regenerate 1L (this replaces the usual regeneration rate of 1B per round)
Essence (1) – Enter the Shadow if in the presence of a Locus, without need for a roll.
20/5+14/Story; Essence Bleed: 1/Twelve Hours
Renown: Wisdom •••••, Cunning •••, Glory •••, Purity •••, Honor ••
Gifts
Does not get 10-again on Gift rolls
:
1st:
Heart of Things (Wisdom •)

This Gift allows a werewolf to size up a situation in the blink of an eye, instantly divining who is friend and who is foe, or piecing together the nature of some event based on a quick examination of the evidence left behind. Activating this Gift causes the user’s eyes to reflect a thin, crescent-shaped sliver of light, as though the Ithalunim shines through them, using its own sight to pull together an accurate picture of the scene.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: This Gift does not require a roll.
Action: Reflexive


When this Gift is activated, Rakesh adds his Wisdom Renown to the dice pool of any Mental or Social roll made to infer some piece of knowledge from observation (e.g. Wits + Empathy to guess whether someone is lying, Intelligence + Investigation to piece together the nature of a crime from evidence left behind) for the rest of the scene. In addition, if the action required to infer this knowledge requires longer than a single turn (or one turn per roll in the case of extended actions), Rakesh may expend another point of Essence to reduce the time required to an instant action (or one turn per roll, for extended actions).

The wisdom of the Ithalunim comes not without some risk. Should Rakesh fail any action that benefits from this Gift, he gains a temporary fixation derangement (p. 97, World of Darkness Rulebook) bent towards “solving” the mystery. This derangement fades after 24 hours
Heart of Things (Wisdom •),
Shadow Speaking (Witch's Moon •)
The Ithaeur becomes a vessel, allowing spirits on the other side of the Gauntlet to speak through him. The spirit peaks with his voice, and looks with his eyes. This gift is obviously most useful when the pack is unwilling or unable to cross the Gauntlet in a particular location, but still wishes to interrogate the spirits of the area.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Intelligence+Occult+Glory
Action: Instant

Success: Any spirit that is in the Shadow Reflection of the immediate area (such as in the same room) may choose to contact the pack through the Ithaeur. This is not possession, and the spirit is no more able to affect the physical world than usual; the only thing that is facilitated is communication. Though nothing compels a spirit to take the Ithaeur up on the offer, the invitation is usually interesting enough for a spirit to take it up out of curiosity. Spirits speak in the First Tongue, and the Ithaeur cannot hear himself speak while the Gift lasts, though he is awake and able to witness the entire conversation.

In the case of multiple spirits, the strongest will usually establish contact, though a cacophony of conflicting voices is also possible. The Gift lasts as long as the Ithaeur is willing to maintain concentration.
Exceptional Success: The spirit is entranced by the experience, and any social rolls made to influence the spirit get an additional +1.
Shadow Speaking (Witch's Moon •),
Wolf-Blood's Lure (Father Wolf •)
A werewolf is not simply a person with the power to transform into a wolf, he’s a person with a wolf’s soul. The simplest of Father Wolf’s Gifts to master, Wolf-Blood’s Lure allows one of the People to draw on his wolf soul, projecting it so that he seems more animal than human. While many mundane canines are naturally uncomfortable in the presence of the Uratha as predators, this Gift makes the werewolf seem more like one of the pack. While this Gift offers no additional control over mundane wolves or canids, the user finds it easier to earn a wolf pack’s trust or intimidate a guard dog.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: This power requires no roll.
Action: Reflexive

When activated, this Gift grants the character the ability to communicate with wolves and dogs, regardless of what form he’s in. In addition, a bonus die is gained on all Social rolls made involving wolves or other canids. The Gift’s effects last from moonrise to moonset, or from moonset to moonrise.
Wolf-Blood's Lure (Father Wolf •),
Death Sight (Death •)
While this Gift is in effect, Rakesh’s eyes turn a milky white, as if covered with cataracts, but he can still perceive what’s going on around him.
Cost: None
Dice Pool: None
Action: Instant

For the duration of a scene, Rakesh’s sight is attuned to the dead. He can perceive ghosts, even if they would ordinarily be invisible. Doing so requires Rakesh to simply will the capability into effect with an action.

While the Gift is active, Rakesh may make an Intelligence + Occult roll to detect any “stains” of death in an area. Making such a search is an instant action. Success allows him to see a phantom bloodstain wherever a creature at least the size of a cat died within the last lunar month. The size of the bloodstain reveals the rough emotional discharge of the death. A human being who died peacefully and a dog who died in pain leave approximately the same size stain (about the size of a human torso). The darker the stain, the more recent the death. This Gift cannot reveal anything more about the circumstances of any death in question. One would need to use both this Gift and Echo Dream (Werewolf Core, p. 123) to pinpoint and analyze the scene of a murder.

The effects of Death Sight apply only when Rakesh is in the physical world.
Death Sight (Death •),
Two-World Eyes (Crescent Moon •)
Although they’re creatures of two worlds, the Urathacan exist fully in only one or the other. They can look from one to the other or cross the boundary that separates them, but doing so is still an all-or-nothing proposition. Ithaeur, however, can peer across the line between worlds without sacrificing their perception of either. In one eye, the werewolf sees the physical world, while in the other eye, she sees what happens in the corresponding area of the Shadow. The eye that sees the world that the werewolf does not currently inhabit films over with the deep indigo of the night sky, lit by pinpoints of starlight.

None of the werewolf’s senses except sight stretch across the Gauntlet while this Gift is active, but the werewolf suffers no penalties for having her attention divided. The effect lasts for as many turns as the player rolls successes. The presence or influence of a locus has no effect on the use of this Gift.

Using this Gift does not make characters on the opposite side of the Gauntlet aware of your character’s attention. Mundane effects that impair your character’s eyesight (such as a flashbulb going off in his face, a smoke grenade occluding the air, or simple darkness) impose the same penalties while the character’s attention is divided as they normally would.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Wits + Occult + Wisdom
Action: Instant

Dramatic Failure: The landscape across the Gauntlet overwhelms the character’s senses rather than dividing them evenly. He is subject to the normal penalties for peeking across the Gauntlet (see p. 252), for the remainder of the scene. Crossing the Gauntlet during this period only causes his perceptions to shift back to the other side, rather than clearing up the problem.
Failure: The character cannot peer across the Gauntlet.
Success: The character can see and understand what’s happening on both sides of the Gauntlet without penalty.
Exceptional Success: In addition to sight, the character can divide his sense of either smell or hearing across the Gauntlet as well.
Two-World Eyes (Crescent Moon •),
Partial Change (Mother Luna •)
This subtle Gift allows a werewolf to transform only the parts of himself that he needs in order to complete a task at hand.

This power activates as per standard shapeshifting rules.

Dramatic Failure: Another feature of a different form is assumed instead of the one intended (the Storyteller decides which). Human onlookers are subject to Lunacy as if their Willpower is two dots higher than normal.
Failure: No change occurs.
Success: Rakesh chooses which parts of himself he transforms. The result might allow him to use certain abilities normally restricted to other forms (such as tracking by scent or using claws in Hishu; the Storyteller decides what modifiers transfer over). Though he may change as much or as little as he wishes, the choice is final. To add or subtract any feature requires another use of the Gift (so “undoing” features also requires another application of the power). The Storyteller decides if and how any human onlookers might spot the character’s features and potentially suffer Lunacy. If it is triggered, normal rules apply and subjects’ Willpower is considered one higher than normal.
Exceptional Success: The change occurs as a reflexive action without the expenditure of an Essence point.
Partial Change (Mother Luna •),
Mask of Rage (Rage •)
Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: This power does not require a roll
Action: Instant

The character makes himself seem preternaturally terrifying by exposing onlookers to Lunacy and intensifying its effects. If the character does so in Dalu or Urshul form, Lunacy is as intense as it would be if he were in Gauru form. If he does so in Hishu or Urhan form, he emanates a Lunacy inducing effect as if he were in either Dalu or Urshul form (respectively). This Gift cannot be activated in Gauru form. The effect lasts for as long as the werewolf remains in the form in which he activates it, for as long as he chooses, or for the rest of the scene (whichever comes first).
Mask of Rage (Rage •)
2nd:
Befuddle (Wisdom ••)
By speaking in riddles and apparently paradoxical koans, Rakesh sets an Ithalunim upon a rival, confusing him and twisting his perceptions. The victim begins to question his own beliefs, and even the very nature of his soul.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: Wits + Expression + Wisdom versus Composure + Primal Urge or Resistance (for spirits)
Action: Instant, Contested

Dramatic Failure: The target is not affected by the Gift, and is immune to any other attempted uses until the next crescent moon. In addition, Rakesh gains a temporary paranoia derangement that lasts for 24 hours. The paranoia focuses on the belief that Rakesh’s wisdom is false and that she herself is the fool.
Failure: The target is not affected by the Gift.
Success: Rakesh’s words befuddle the target, crippling him with uncertainty and self doubt. The target suffers a penalty equal to Rakesh’s Wisdom Renown (5) on all Mental Skill or Attribute rolls for the rest of the scene.
Exceptional Success: The penalty lasts until the next crescent moon instead.
Befuddle (Wisdom ••),
Hone Rage (Rage ••)
A character with this Gift can channel the power of his Rage more efficiently than the average character, sacrificing the time he can spend in Gauru form for increased physical prowess.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: Dexterity+Survival+Purity
Action: Reflexive

Dramatic Failure: The character loses one turn from Gauru duration, but no additional Attribute dots are gained
Failure: The character neither loses any time in Gauru form nor gains any additional Attribute dots.
Success: For every success rolled, the player may sacrifice one turn of Gauru Rage. For each turn so sacrificed, the player may apply a temporary bonus dot to either Strength or Dexterity. Trait maximums due to Primal Urge do not apply, and the bonus dots disappear when the character changes out of his Gauru form. Extra successes beyond the number of turns of Gauru form remaining confer no benefit.
Exceptional Success: The player adds Stamina to the Attributes that may gain dots. Remember that Health increases as a result, though the time he may spend in Gauru form (Stamina + Primal Urge) does not benefit.
Hone Rage (Rage ••)
Mighty Bound (Strength ••)
Rakesh gains +6 to any jumping roll. This effect is permanent.
Mighty Bound (Strength ••),
Anybeast (Mother Luna ••)
This Gift allows a werewolf to temporarily camouflage itself in the skin of another carnivorous beast. Urhan form might come to resemble a hyena, while a werewolf might use the skin of a grizzly bear to disguise his Urshul form.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: This power does not require a roll
Action: Instant

This Gift can affect Rakesh’s Dalu, Gauru, Urshul and Urhan forms, within reason. The animal form to be mimicked must have the same general size and build for him to duplicate it in Urshul or Urhan form. He couldn’t appear to be a bear in Urhan form, as a bear is simply too large, and taking the form of an eagle or wolverine is outright impossible. Traits don’t change, nor do modifiers to attacks or actions. Rakesh retains the capabilities of his own form.

The Gift effects last even if Rakesh shapeshifts into Dalu or Gauru form, although disguise is no longer a possibility. Instead, he appears to be a hybrid of human and the appropriate carnivore. Mimicking a tiger in Urshul form might make him appear to be a monstrous tiger-man if he takes Gauru form before the Gift effect ends.

The Gift lasts for the duration of the scene, or until Rakesh chooses to end its effects.
Anybeast (Mother Luna ••),
Read Spirit (Crescent Moon ••)
The spirit servants of Luna see and know more than they let on, and wise Ithaeur can gain a portion of their Ithaeur allies’ insight for their own. As a reward for such wisdom, the spirits of the Crescent Moon Choir share what information they have, singing in a high, lilting whisper that only a werewolf using this Gift can hear.

With the expenditure of one Essence point and a single success achieved on an Intelligence + Occult + Cunning roll, the werewolf hears an internal voice like that of the ethereal Ithalunim. The voice reveals the name, type and Rank of a spirit under scrutiny. Another pertinent fact is also gained for each success after the first. “Pertinent facts” include the spirit’s Power, Finesse or Resistance score; its Willpower; its Essence; its Speed; or what Charms it has (on a one-Charm-per-success basis). These revelations are always couched in in-character terms. The Gift reveals that a spirit “has an exceptional strength of will,” not that the spirit “has Willpower 9.” This Gift may be used only once on any given spirit during a particular scene.

The Ithaeur’s player decides the facts for which her successes count. If the Ithaeur is exceptionally lucky, the Lune might also reveal an even more interesting fact about the spirit. Such facts include what the spirit was doing at a specific time, what ban it asks of werewolf supplicants, what languages it speaks other than the First Tongue or what obscure behavior might offend it.

The spirit to be read need not be under the werewolf’s power or even be present for this Gift to work, but the Ithaeur has to have at least had some personal experience with the spirit in order to invoke this Gift. (One scene of any sort of interaction suffices for a spirit that is not present.) If she’s only read about a particular spirit or heard stories about it, the knowledge of the Ithaeur doesn’t help.

This power does not give information about ghosts or supernatural beings who use a power to render themselves immaterial (such as vampires using the Twilight Projection power). Nor does it offer information on werewolves, Beshilu, Azlu or other creatures of both flesh and spirit.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: Intelligence + Occult + Cunning
Action: Instant

Dramatic Failure: The Lune’s response is filtered through a haze of lunar madness, offering inaccurate information about the spirit.
Failure: The Gift does not provide answers to the Ithaeur’s question; she is met with silence or perhaps by garbled lunatic nonsense.
Success: The Gift reveals the spirit’s name (if it has an individual name), type and Rank, as well as one additional fact per success rolled after the first.
Exceptional Success: As a success, and the Lune reveals one specific fact about the spirit that could prove pertinent to the plot of the story.
Read Spirit (Crescent Moon ••),
Father Wolf's Speed (Father Wolf ••)
Father Wolf was said to be as fleet as the wind, able to outrun the swiftest prey. Werewolves naturally share a measure of his great speed, but this Gift can increase their swiftness even further. A clever werewolf uses this Gift to run at the same pace as the rest of his pack then surprise prey with a sudden burst when the moment is right. This Gift cannot be used when the werewolf is in Hishu or Dalu form. The character’s Speed is doubled (after modifiers for his current form are determined). In addition, the character subtracts two dice from opponents’ Firearms dice pools. The effects last for a scene.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: This power requires no roll.
Action: Reflexive
Father Wolf's Speed (Father Wolf ••),
Ghost Knife (Death ••)
Not all ghosts are harmless, and this Gift allows a werewolf to deal with one who isn’t in a particularly expedient fashion. By imbuing a weapon with a portion of his own Essence, a werewolf can enchant it so that it strikes an immaterial ghost as readily as it would strike a living target.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: None
Action: Instant

The werewolf must be holding or touching the weapon in question in order to infuse it with Essence. The object need not be specifically designed as a weapon; this Gift can be used to imbue a crowbar, 2x4 or chainsaw as readily as a sword or gun. For the duration of the scene, the imbued weapon is considered enchanted for purposes of damaging ghosts (World of Darkness Rulebook, p. 214). A weapon enchanted by Ghost Knife may inflict bashing or lethal damage, depending on the character’s choice. A klaive sword can be given a merciful enchantment so that it inflicts only bashing damage on ghosts (though it still inflicts lethal damage to corporeal targets). A weapon affected by this Gift also adds a bonus die to any attack rolls made with the weapon against a ghost.

This Gift does not grant a weapon the ability to strike any ephemeral entity - only ghosts. Thus, a weapon imbued with Ghost Knife could not harm a spirit that is in Twilight (p. 252) or an Irraka using the Gift: Ghost Step (p. 133). However, the +1 bonus to attack spirits does still apply if the spirit could normally be struck, such as if the spirit was using a Numen to materialize or if both spirit and werewolf were in the Shadow.

If Ghost Knife is used to imbue a gun with Essence, the Gift effects apply to any bullets loaded at the time of infusion — bullets loaded into the gun after infusion do not acquire the Gift’s effects. Muscle-powered projectile weapons such as bows do not convey the Gift’s properties to ammunition. The werewolf must instead use the Gift on a quiver of arrows or a handful of javelins.

A character may use this Gift to imbue his own natural weaponry, allowing him to tear into a ghost as if it were solid, or even punch or grapple it. This Gift cannot be used to empower the natural weaponry of another creature. Only the Gift user can benefit.

This Gift in itself does not grant the ability to see or otherwise perceive ghosts.
Ghost Knife (Death ••),
3rd:
Corpse Witness (Death •••)
Many occultists believe that a corpse retains some memory of the moments just before its death. The Bone Shadows, however, know that a corpse can sometimes know more. With this Gift, a corpse can be ordered to give up the secrets of all that it has “seen” since its death. This Gift works only on corpses that still have some flesh to them, and only the head is necessary. The werewolf opens the jaws of the corpse and breathes into the corpse’s mouth. If the Gift works, the breath returns with the corpse’s words.

Some Bone Shadows have historically exploited this Gift in gruesome fashion, setting up the severed heads of their foes (or victims) as sentinels on the boundaries of their territory. In the modern era, it’s hard — but not impossible — to set such morbid guardians in place without attracting the wrong sort of attention.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: Manipulation + Occult + Purity
Action: Instant

Dramatic Failure: The corpse speaks a garbled litany of blasphemies from the darkest corners of Death’s realm. The werewolf loses a point of Willpower from the experience. This Gift may not be used again on the same corpse.
Failure: The corpse divulges nothing more than a death rattle. This Gift may not be used again on the same corpse in the same day.

Success: The corpse breathes out a report of what it has “perceived” — the key notes of what has transpired within view of its eyes or eye sockets within the last day and night. The report is not incredibly detailed, but generally hews to the facts that the werewolf would consider important. For example, the corpse might mention that 18 cars had appeared along the country road it “watched” during the day. It would only single out an individual car if the vehicle was significantly remarkable, such as a pickup with several armed men sitting in the bed. A corpse’s account for any given day can be attained only once.

Exceptional Success: The corpse demonstrates vestiges of its former intelligence and can actually clarify its account by answering the character’s questions. The character may ask one question per success gained on the roll before the corpse goes dormant again. Information gained may still be somewhat imprecise, though. A corpse is not likely to have retained a license-plate number unless the plate remained in its line of sight for a few minutes.
Corpse Witness (Death •••),
Technology Ward (Warding •••)
Werewolves are creatures born of a primal time. They rely on their teeth and claws first, the powers won from the spirit world second, and human technology as a distant third. Naturally, they favor stacking the battlefield in their favor by doing what they can to ensure that their prey must rely on similar advantages instead of advanced tools. This Gift is an effective means of removing any technological advantage, thus giving werewolves the edge.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: Presence + Crafts + Cunning
Action: Instant

Success: The werewolf howls up a spiritual barrier that wreaks havoc on any electronic item and any mechanical device more complex than a simple lever or bow within the warded area (a radius equal to five feet per success rolled). Electronic devices are rendered completely useless within the zone, and complex mechanical devices such as automobiles and firearms are disabled. Cars governed by onboard computers stand no chance of working. All purely mechanical devices, including most firearms and older model cars, stand a good chance of suffering a mechanical failure; all efforts to use such devices are reduced to a chance roll. The effects of this Gift last for one scene.
Exceptional Success: The radius of effect extends to five yards per success rolled.
Technology Ward (Warding •••),
Luck Eating (Witch's Moon •••)
Some Ithaeur are able to hex their enemies in a particularly subtle fashion. With this Gift, the Crescent Moon can devour a portion of her target’s luck for her own use. The Ithaeur must touch the target in order to activate this Gift; any touch will do, even casually brushing against him in a crowd. The Gift is a subtle one, and the victim fails to realize that anything has happened until something goes terribly wrong.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: Wits + Occult + Cunning versus target’s Resolve + Primal Urge
Action: Instant, Contested

Success: The Ithaeur successfully establishes contact. At any point before the next moonrise, the Ithaeur may choose to devour a portion of the target’s luck as a reflexive action. Once she does so, the target suffers a -3 penalty to his next dice roll, and the Ithaeur gains a +3 bonus to her next dice roll. An Ithaeur can only be “attached” to one victim at a time through means of this Gift.
Exceptional Success: The stolen luck rises to five dice rather than three.
Luck-Eating (Witch's Moon •••)
4th:
Skin-Stealing (••••)
Old human legends describe werewolves as creatures that learned the art of shapeshifting by dressing in the skins of wolves. This Gift lends some credence to those stories, for the werewolf who has learned its secret can garb himself in the skin of almost any human whose blood he has tasted. The disguise created is almost perfect — disturbingly so.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: This power does not require a roll
Action: Instant

When activated, the Gift sheathes Rakesh in a brand-new skin. The new skin is not part of his body; it’s more like a full-body glove. It fits perfectly, though, and the Gift transforms Rakesh’s body to fit the dimensions of the imitated individual. Therefore, the his Hishu form shrinks if he’s impersonating a particularly small person or swells if he’s wearing the stolen skin of an obese person. Although Rakesh “wears” the skin, the skin is warm to the touch, sweats and bleeds in perfect imitation of living tissue. The new skin doesn’t cover the eyes or orifices, however, and Rakesh may still be given away by different eye color or dental work. This Gift can duplicate the skin of a mage or an ordinary human, but not that of a vampire or other undead creature. This Gift can also duplicate the skin of a werewolf, and it is retained throughout all five forms, although the cost increases to two Essence.

The new skin grants four bonus successes to any disguise rolls (World of Darkness Rulebook, p. 87) made to impersonate the subject in question. The stolen skin gives off the same scent as the impersonated being and masks the werewolf’s own scent. Rakesh’s Attributes are unmodified. He must remain in Hishu form to use this Gift. If Rakesh shapeshifts while still wearing a false skin, the skin tears apart and is shed. (The exception is if Rakesh “borrows” a werewolf’s skin. In this case, an additional Essence keeps the skin intact when shapeshifting, mimicking the subject’s appearance in all forms.) The effects of the Gift last for a scene, although Rakesh may end them sooner by tearing off the skin or shapeshifting.
Skin-Stealing (Mother Luna ••••)
5th:
Forbidden Knowledge (Wisdom •••••)
Some knowledge in this world is not meant for man or Uratha. Beyond the rude boundaries of physics and rational law lies the Shadow. Beyond the Shadow lies the yawning abyss of nothingness upon which the world floats, like an island in a sea of oblivion. In that vast emptiness, things swim, things antithetical to all life and as alien as the idigam, if not more so. The Ithalunim have knowledge of such things (and some Ithaeur even suggest that said knowledge is the reason for the Oracle choir’s madness), and though they exact a terrible toll for sharing it, Ithaeur who master this Gift can compel them to share that knowledge; using this blasphemous knowledge, the character cuts through uncertainty and chance, acting with perfect certainty of success.

When the character activates this Gift, the player does not roll for the next instant action he takes before the end of the scene. Instead, the player is considered to have automatically garnered one success per point of Wisdom Renown (since this is a rank 5 Gift, that usually means five successes). On uncontested or resisted rolls, this is enough to ensure an exceptional success. For contested actions, the contesting player rolls normally against the Ithaeur’s pool of automatic successes.

The power of this Gift comes at a punishing cost: the sheer alien nature of the knowledge given by the Ithalunim causes lasting, physical harm to the body, leeching out life simply by exposure to that horrible nothingness. Upon using this Gift, the character takes one point of lethal damage per dot of her Wisdom Renown. This damage heals at the rate a human would heal lethal damage (one point per two days unless the character has the Fast Healer Merit), and cannot be healed through Essence expenditure. Mark these wounds on the character sheet with a small dot below the Health box to track these wounds separately from any other wounds. The character also gains a severe derangement of the Storyteller’s choice, which lasts until the next crescent moon.

This Gift can only be used once per chapter.

Cost: 3 Essence and 1 Willpower
Dice Pool: This power does not require a roll.
Action: Instant
Forbidden Knowledge (Wisdom •••••),
Primal Form (•••••)

The werewolf who learns this Gift goes beyond the already terrifying power and savagery of the children of Luna and becomes something truly monstrous. This Gift calls on the power of a time when Luna looked down upon Pangaea, transforming the user into a creature that’s one part prehistoric beast and one part pure nightmare. Werewolves among the Forsaken use this Gift only in times of dire need, because they fear it will drive them to acts of violence unspeakable even to them, and because the form has another, more sinister reputation. The greatest among the Pure Tribes known as the Predator Kings have long learned this Gift for a very specific purpose — to them, Primal Form is meant specifically for hunting the Forsaken.

Cost: 1 Essence
Dice Pool: Stamina + Survival + Primal Urge (The dice pool normally rolled to change shape applies, as opposed to one involving a Renown trait.)
Action: Instant (Unlike a conventional shapechange, one Essence cannot be spent to make this one reflexive.)

Dramatic Failure: The character fails to assume Primal Form, and the strain of the effort exhausts him. He may not attempt to change to any other form or use any of Mother Luna’s Gifts for five turns.
Failure: The character fails to assume Primal Form.
Success: The character shifts into a form that resembles Urshul, but that is even larger. Primal Form stands six to eight feet tall at the shoulder. It’s treated as Urshul in most respects, including the general inability to speak (see p. 172), with the following exceptions:
• The form’s dot modifiers are: Strength +4, Dexterity +2, Stamina +4, Manipulation –3, Size +3, Health +7, Initiative +2, Speed +9. The character is treated as having 2/1 armor due to the form’s thick hide.
• The character causes Lunacy as if he were in Gauru.
• The character heals one point of lethal damage per turn, at the beginning of his turn. This replaces the one point of bashing damage that werewolves normally heal per turn unless the character has suffered only bashing damage. (If the player spends a point of Essence to heal — see p. 168 — the character regenerates an additional point of lethal damage.)
• All Resolve + Composure rolls to resist Death Rage are at –3.
The character can remain in Primal Form for one turn per success achieved on the power’s activation roll. Unlike other Mother Luna’s Gifts, the character cannot voluntarily choose to end this Gift’s effects prematurely unless a successful Resolve + Composure roll is made at a –3 penalty.
Exceptional Success: The glorious fury that accompanies Primal Form rushes through the character without forcing him to lose control… yet. The character also regains a Willpower point.
Primal Form (Mother Luna •••••)
Rituals
Unless otherwise specified, all Rites have a dice pool of Harmony+Rituals. Teamwork actions may apply, but only on extended rolls, and only if the assistant knows the same Rite (or has suitable spirit magics, for instance, Spirit Arcana at the rank of the Rite +1.

Suggested Modifiers
[b]+2 Ritemaster meditates successfully prior to ritual (that is, four or more successes are accumulated in a meditation Attribute task — see World of Darkness Rulebook, p. 51)
+2 In the vicinity of a powerful locus (rated ••••+)
+1 In the vicinity of a locus (rated • to •••)
+1 Ritualist has gained goodwill of local spirits
+1 Ritemaster is in Dalu form
+1 Ritemaster’s auspice moon is in the sky
–1 to –3 Performer suffers wound penalties
–1 Local spirits are hostile to ritualist
–1 City suburb or town (only if rite is performed in physical world)
–1 Distracting environment (powerful odors, noisy)
–2 Packmates are involved in battle
–2 Dense urban area (only if rite is performed in physical world)
–2 Ritemaster is struck during rite but takes no damage
–3 Rite is performed in a Barren
: 4; Rites:
1st
Preserving the Trail
This rite keeps a scent trail from going cold with respect to the ritualist, so that she can continue to follow it for days, weeks, months, or even years if need be. In ancient times, fugitives from the justice of the People might run to distant lands, expecting to escape their just punishments through distance, alone. Irraka were often called upon to pursue these criminals into far-off places, to deliver judgment upon them, no matter where they might flee.

Performing the Rite: The ritualist performs the rite at a location at which she can catch the scent in question. This may be the quarry’s living quarters or just a place that he happened to pass through a couple of hours ago. Alternatively, she can use an article of clothing or something else that carries his scent, allowing the rite to be enacted almost anywhere. She locates the strongest source of the scent and closely sniffs at and even tastes the specific site or object. She then intones the following in the First Tongue: Nihu ba eshe ges (roughly translated, “I will find you anywhere in the world.”)

Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual
Action: Instant

Success: For one full lunar month, the quarry’s scent (see Werewolf: The Forsaken, 178–80) does not fade with respect to the ritualist; no matter how much time passes or what environmental conditions occur (rain or snow, for instance), his trail remains fresh and easily tracked. Provided that the ritualist successfully performs this rite again before its duration elapses, she can indefinitely preserve the integrity of a scent trail. Successes accrued for supernatural occlusion effects that might compromise the scent of the prey are directly compared against the ritualist’s successes, with ties going to the quarry. If the werewolf presently has the taste of the prey’s blood, however, ties go to the ritualist.
Exceptional Success: The trail remains fresh for the ritualist for an entire year of lunar months (a little over 354 days).
Preserving the Trail,
Rite of Dedication
This ritual allows the ritualist to magically ‘dedicate’ an object so that it transforms along with a werewolf during shapeshifting. If feasible, the object alters size/dimensions to suit the new form, or failing that, merges in with the flesh. For example, if a werewolf has dedicated a suit of clothes, a necklace and a wristwatch, all these objects change in size to suit his new form when he assumes Dalu. When he shifts to Gauru, the clothes merge with his flesh, but the wristwatch and necklace might shift size again. When he takes Urhan form, the wristwatch also blends with his flesh, while the necklace might remain. In addition, all these objects remain with him when he enters the spirit world, although the un-dedicated flashlight he carries doesn’t.

A simple set of clothing counts as one item. A backpack and its contents also count as one item, although only the contents inside the backpack at the time of the rite. If a werewolf later adds something to the backpack, it doesn’t count as dedicated unless the rite is performed again with the new object inside. The contents of an article of clothing’s pockets aren’t considered part of the clothing, unless the werewolf dedicates that particular article of clothing as a separate item. Therefore, if a werewolf dedicates a business suit to himself as “one item,” the watch in his pocket doesn’t count as dedicated. If, however, he dedicates his favorite pair of jeans to himself as one item, the wallet in the pocket counts as dedicated.

Performing the Rite: The ritemaster may perform this ritual on himself or on other werewolves. It involves cutting the recipient with a claw and smearing his blood on the item in question, drawing a circular pattern. At the culmination of the rite, the item absorbs the blood, leaving no stain. The ritual takes a few minutes for every item to be dedicated.
Cost: None
Action: Extended (10 successes, each roll is one turn)

The character may not have more than (Primal Urge) in items dedicated to him at any one time, and the ritualist may dedicate items for another werewolf.
Rite of Dedication,
Call Beast

Similar to the rites used to summon spirits and humans, this simple rite calls a single animal (or a swarm of very small animals like rats or locusts) to the ritemaster’s location. The ritual summons the closest animal of a desired species within five miles; if no such creature exists (trying to summon a Siberian tiger in the middle of rural Nebraska, for instance), the rite fails. The ritemaster cannot summon a specific animal, nor can she summon supernatural animals or animals with human-level intelligence.

Performing the Rite: The ritualist marks a specific location and remains close to that spot throughout the performance. He must provide “chiminage” for the animal, typically a moderate amount of food the animal would eat. The ritualist performs a howl of summons while moving counterclockwise around the chiminage. Once the rite has been initiated, the ritualist and any packmates nearby must emit a further howl of summons roughly every five minutes until the rite’s subject arrives.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual vs. Resolve
Action: Extended (15 successes, each roll is one minute

The animal feels an irresistible compulsion to travel to the ritemaster’s location. The beast enters a kind of fugue state; it retains some awareness of his surroundings (enough to navigate and avoid hazards), but it does not react to stimuli. It is drawn for no obvious reason to the ritemaster’s location. It travels to the werewolf’s location as quickly as it can manage. Unlike most animals, it does not try to avoid human inhabited areas or contact with humans, which might create a panic depending on the type of animal summoned.

Once the animal arrives, it can be given a single, simple command (e.g. attack him, follow her, guard me, carry this to here), which it obeys to the best of its ability. If the task is not completed by the end of the scene (or if it is open-ended), the effect ends at the end of the scene. Otherwise, the animal is released from the rite’s effects when the task is completed.

If it takes the animal more than an hour to reach the ritualist, the magic of the rite breaks down. The subject of the rite no longer feels any compulsion to find the ritualist. This rite does not grant the summoned animal any ability to bypass barriers or escape bonds; while it might be possible to affect the tiger at the Bronx Zoo with this ritual, the tiger won’t be able to get out of its enclosure (though it will try mightily for an hour).
Call Beast,
Rite of Spirit's Promise
Bone Shadows deal with spirits on a regular basis, and it helps to speak from a position of strength. The best way to gain such a position, of course, is to know a spirit’s ban, but finding out this information is a matter of careful investigation (the Gift: Read Spirit works, too, but not every pack has a Crescent Moon). The Rite of the Spirit’s Promise determines a spirit’s ban fairly quickly, but the rite also risks reprisal — spirits don’t like being so closely investigated by Uratha. A Bone Shadow performing this rite on a spirit more powerful that he is had better have his pack handy.

Performing the Rite: The werewolf need not be able to see the spirit in order to use this rite, but he must be in the spirit’s presence or know its name. The Bone Shadow intones a quiet First Tongue phrase asking for insight, and draws a symbol in the dirt or on a wall. If the ritual succeeds, knowledge of the spirit’s ban becomes clear to the werewolf. In any case, though, the spirit might notice what is happening, and it can use the connection created by the rite to attack the ritualist.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual vs. Resolve
Action: Extended (Spirit's Rank, each roll is one turn)

Success: Progress is made toward the goal. When the player accrues successes equal to the spirit’s Rank, the spirit’s ban comes to the character in a flash of insight. The Storyteller does not provide the mechanical aspects of the ban, however. For instance, a garbage-spirit might suffer three points of damage to its Corpus per turn of contact with cleansing chemicals. If the character uses this rite, though, all she knows is that the spirit “cannot abide the touch of cleansing chemicals,” not that it damages the spirit. Each turn that the character rolls to accrue successes for this rite, the targeted spirit has a chance to notice what’s happening. The Storyteller rolls the spirit’s Finesse. If the roll succeeds, the spirit realizes what is happening and can use its Numina on the werewolf as if it possessed the Reaching Numen (see p. 278 of Werewolf: The Forsaken). The spirit can use its powers only on the ritualist (unless the spirit actually knows the Reaching Numen, of course), and only as long as the rite continues.
Exceptional Success: Significant progress is made toward the goal. If the rite concludes with successes equal to the spirit’s Rank + 5, the Storyteller must inform the player of the mechanical aspects of the ban.
Rite of Spirit's Promise,
Chiminage Rite

The practice of chiminage, offering a spirit a gift of Essence to gain a favor or coerce it into some action, is a long-standing part of werewolf culture. Offerings of chiminage are even integrated into many rites. This rite formalizes the practice, imbuing the act with spiritual significance that gives the ritemaster a subtle power over a spirit. Ithaeur often use this rite as a “carrot” to open negotiations, before employing the “stick” of banishment or the like.

Performing the Rite: The Ithaeur sets up an altar (which can be as minimal as a circle drawn in the dirt around a campfire to an elaborate construction of stone reminiscent of a church altar) with a source of flame on it. With a small knife or a claw, she carves off a piece of an object representative of the spirit to whom she is offering chiminage and places it in the fire. Intoning an offering of peace in the First Tongue, she spends a point of Essence to catalyze the offering. The spirit that is the subject of this rite must be at hand when this rite is performed.

Cost: None
Action: Extended (3 successes per rank of the spirit, each roll represents one minute)

When the ritemaster accumulates the required number of successes, the target gains one point of Essence per dot of the ritemaster’s Wisdom Renown. The ritemaster gains a +2 bonus on Gifts, rites, and Social rolls against the target for the rest of the scene. In addition, the performance of this rite removes the need to offer chiminage as part of the performance of any further rites during the scene. Upon an ES, this effect lasts for a week instead.
Chiminage Rite,
Ritual Mind
This holy ritual (which Rakesh does not consider much holy) obviates penalties to a ritual-roll.

Performing the Rite: A werewolf can only use this rite to assist in using another, and the same werewolf must perform both rites. She must prepare all of the materials required for the other rite before starting, and only enacts this rite when ready to start the other as well. The werewolf faces east if she cannot see Mother Luna or west if she is visible in the sky. From there, she takes one deep breath and howls her need for clear thought and balance to the four cardinal directions, turning clockwise. The rite takes less than two minutes to perform.

Cost: 1 Essence
Action: Instant

Upon success, the ritualist gains one dice to the next ritual that can only be used to offset penalties (not gain a bonus). Upon an ES, he gains three dice.
Ritual Mind
2nd
Curse of Shadows
This unpleasant rite turns darkness itself against its intended victim. Until the night of the next full moon, she is plagued by visions of menacing black shapes and her sight is clouded by shadow. While the rite is most easily turned against members of the herd, some few Uratha have managed to use it to powerful effect against other werewolves who displease them.

Performing the Rite: Standing over an object of personal significance to the rite’s intended target (a family heirloom, a “lucky” garment, or something of the like), the ritualist walks counterclockwise around the item, continually chanting in the First Tongue: Thi sah kathar (“Suffer in darkness”), until the ritual is either successfully completed or fails.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals versus the subject’s Composure + Primal Urge
Action: Contested and extended (the ritualist must accrue successes equal to the subject’s Composure, while the subject must accrue successes equal to the ritualist’s Willpower; each roll requires a minute’s time)

Success: If the ritualist is the first to reach the required number of successes, then the subject is haunted by dark visions (suffering a one-die penalty to all rolls based on her Resolve) and her vision is distorted by phantom shadows (inflicting a two-dice penalty on all Wits + Composure perceptions rolls related to sight), until the night of the next full moon. If the victim dramatically fails a Resolve or perception roll during this time, she gains the suspicion derangement until the ritual expires (or, if she already has suspicion, then it temporarily upgrades to paranoia).
Exceptional Success: Great progress is made or powerful resistance asserted. If the exceptional success concludes the casting of the ritual, then the victim suffers a –2 dice penalty to all Resolve-based rolls and –3 dice to any perception roll.
Curse of Shadows,
Doom Strike
Spirits are notoriously difficult to kill; even disregarding the fact that they reform when “killed” if they have any Essence remaining and the fact that they are normally intangible in the physical world. A spirit’s Traits often give it an extraordinarily high Defense, making it difficult to even land a blow on a spirit foe. Pack tactics and Willpower can help overcome this, but when a warrior must strike hard and strike fast, this Rite can tip the odds. By infusing a werewolf’s claws and fangs with Essence, the ritemaster creates a sympathetic connection between the recipient’s blows and her target’s flesh.

Performing the Rite: The recipient of the rite stands in the center of a stone circle (anything from a ring of pebbles to a megalithic circle of standing stones), holding a burning branch of dogwood in one hand. The ritemaster circles outside the ring, speaking exhortations to glory and victory in battle. At the completion of the rite, the ritemaster slashes her palm open with a talon or a sharp-edged rock and marks the recipient on the breast with his blood. This act infuses the recipient with Essence and activates the rite.

The ritemaster may perform this rite on himself.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals
Action: Extended (1–5 successes; the ritemaster chooses the target number at the start of the rite; each roll represents one turn)

Success: If the target number is reached, the recipient may spend a point of Essence as a reflexive action to allow her next attack against a spirit (within the same turn) to reduce the target’s Defense by a number equal to the number of successes earned on the activation roll. The recipient must attack with either claws or bite to benefit from this rite, and may invoke its effects a number of times equal to the number of successes on the activation roll.
Exceptional Success: If the ritemaster finishes with five or more extra successes, each invocation of this rite allows one attack to ignore the spirit’s Defense.
Doom Strike,
Rouse the Fetish
This rite allows an Uratha to communicate with the spirit of a fetish. It may be used to investigate the properties of a strange, newly won prize or to appease a fetish that is less than happy with its wielder.

Performing the Rite: Much like the binding rites, the Uratha first draws a circle around the urmagan with chalk or some other substance meaningful to the spirit bound into the fetish (if known). The ritualist surrounds this circle with claw sigils and chants softly as he focuses his will. Offerings of chiminage are also helpful, if the nature of the urmagan spirit is known.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual
Action: Extended (Eight successes; each roll represents five minutes)

Success: Successes are gathered. If eight or more are gained, the ritemaster makes contact, and can converse in a limited fashion. The spirit will reveal its nature, Rank and the purpose of the fetish.
Exceptional Success: The spirit is more forthcoming, and may relate details about its binding, past owners or other such information.

Modifier Situation
+2 Ritemaster knows spirit’s name.
+1 Ritemaster makes offering of chiminage.
–1 to –5 per dot of the fetish
Rouse the Fetish,
Echoes of Truth
The truth is a slippery thing. The old saw has it that every story has three sides: your side, the other guy’s side, and the truth. Ritualists have passed this rite from one to another for countless generations, as it remains one of the few reliable means of getting a fragment of the truth without relying on the fickle favor of the Elunim. It only shows a glimpse of what happened, a moment frozen in time like a photograph taken of the past — to the point where some irreverent Iron Masters call this rite “Polaroid Postcognition.” Often that glimpse is enough to reveal hidden details.

Performing the Rite: The ritemaster writes his query on a piece of blank paper or bark, in the First Tongue. The question always starts with the crucial words Duzag lal, “show me.” The question is then burned over a fire made with at least one piece of oak, and the ashes mixed into a bowl of dark ink that shows an image that answers the question.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals
Action: Extended (10 successes; each roll represents 10 minutes)

Success: A still image coalesces in the bowl that answers the werewolf’s request. The image is relevant to the question asked — a werewolf asking to see who stole his keys would see a still image of the moment someone picked his pocket, but if the pickpocket wore a disguise, the image won’t reveal his real face. The image revealed by this rite fades after ten seconds, and can’t be photographed or otherwise recorded.
Exceptional Success: The image reveals incidental details that give a lot away — the pickpocket in the above example had a distinctive tattoo. Rolls based off information gained from the image gain a +1 modifier.
Echoes of Truth,
Call Gaffling
This ritual, and it’s brother rite Call Jaggling are the core of the ritemaster’s repertoire. Though most spirits are inherently unfriendly towards werewolves, they must come if called, though they are not required to cooperate. Most spirits contest this ritual unless bribed with rich chiminage or threatened by binding.

Performing the Rite: This rite is relatively simple. The werewolf marks out a sacred circle and sits in the middle. She consumes a small amount of reality-expanding natural substance — a hallucinogen, stimulant or depressant, as per the ritualist’s traditions. She then places a few hundred grams of chiminage on the ground before her. While this is most often food of some kind appropriate to the spirit’s type, it can also be precious metal, gems or another substance. The greater the value of the chiminage, the more likely the Gaffling is to cooperate with the werewolf’s request.

The chiminage may be burned, buried or doused with water in order to bring it to the spirits’ attention. The ritualist then performs a howl of summons. A single Gaffling of the chosen type arrives within several minutes of the beginning of the rite if all goes well.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual versus the subject’s Resistance
Action Contested and Extended (40 successes, each roll is one minute.)

First to gather 40 successes is the victor. In the event of an Exceptional Success on any specific roll, all subsequent rolls by the opponent suffer a -1 penalty.

Suggested Modifiers
+2 Chiminage is very valuable to the spirit
[b]+1 Spirit is particularly disposed toward ritemaster’s tribe or auspice (an Elunim answering an Elodoth’s rite, a war-spirit answering a Rahu’s rite)
+1 Chiminage is particularly valuable to the spirit
+1 or more The werewolf outranks the spirit*
–1 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit
–3 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit from one mile away
–5 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit from 10 miles away
Call Gaffling,
Banish Spirit
This ritual forces a spirit in the material plane back through the Gauntlet and into the Shadow. It’s something of a brute-force ritual, as it’s painful for the spirits, but it’s an effective ‘goad’ for uncooperative entities.

Performing the Rite: The targeted spirit must be bound with the Bind Spirit rite or by physically preventing its host from moving more than a meter or two in any direction. The ritualist approaches the bound spirit and performs a brief snarl of exile and refusal, complete with similar gestures. The ritualist then slowly circles the bound spirit counterclockwise, and sprinkles it with salt water from each of the four cardinal directions.

The key of the ritual is the five-time repetition of the First Tongue phrase, “I banish you from this realm,” Galer za da sar. The ritualist doesn’t have to repeat the phrase five times in a row. He may sprinkle it throughout the performance, but the ritual isn’t complete until the phrase is said for a fifth time.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual versus the subject’s Resistance
Action Contested and Extended (10 successes, each roll is one minute.)

If the ritemaster reaches 10 successes first, the spirit is banished. If the spirit reaches it first, it stays put, and another attempt cannot be made by any werewolf/spirit mage to banish it for the next 24 hours.
Banish Spirit,
Shadow Conveyance
It’s a common feature of shamanic myths that when a shaman travels to the realm of spirits, he makes use of some sort of vehicle while there. It might be a dugout canoe, a chariot, or a spectral horse, or something more fanciful, but it serves to speed the shaman along his way. This rite allows an Ithaeur to craft such a conveyance for himself, using the Essence that infuses his spirit half.

Performing the Rite: The ritemaster first creates or acquires a small model of the vehicle she wishes to bring into being in the Shadow. This model can be anything from a hand-whittled carving of a dog sled to a die-cast toy car. The ritemaster prepares an ink made from nightshade, woundwort, and ayahuasca or a similar natural hallucinogen, with which he marks the model with glyphs representing the shadow. The model is, finally, destroyed, creating an echo in the Shadow bound to the Ithaeur.

A Shadow conveyance is not a spirit; it is merely a construct of ephemera. Even if the conveyance resembles a living being (and in the Shadow, that can be a broad category indeed), it is a mindless automaton; any resemblance to a real creature or its behaviors are purely cosmetic. The conveyance can only be piloted by the Ithaeur; for any other character the vessel simply refuses to move.

The Shadow conveyance has the following Traits: Durability 1, Size 5 (one passenger), Structure 5, Acceleration 10, Safe Speed 44 (30 mph), Maximum Speed 88 (60 mph), Handling 0. Vehicles are covered on pp. 141–147 of the World of Darkness Rulebook.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual
Action Extended (20 successes; each roll represents 10 minutes)

Success: Successes are gained. When the ritemaster completes the ritual, the Shadow conveyance is completed and will manifest near the character the next time he enters the Shadow. If the rite was performed in the Shadow, the conveyance appears immediately in the ritemaster’s vicinity. When he leaves the Shadow, the conveyance vanishes. The Shadow conveyance persists for one month.
Exceptional Success: Rapid progress is made. If the ritemaster completes the rite with five or more extra successes, the Shadow conveyance has the following Traits: Durability 4, Size 9 (four passengers), Structure 10, Acceleration 20, Safe Speed 88 (60 mph), Maximum Speed 161 (110 mph), Handling 2.
Shadow Conveyance,
Scarlet Messenger
This rite creates a short-lived spirit that can take a message to anyone, anywhere.

Performing the Rite: The ritemaster cuts open her flesh (usually a palm or forearm) and lets 33 droplets of blood drip onto the ground by her feet. At the end of this offering, the werewolf beseeches the blood to awaken and carry forth a single message, and speaks one sentence aloud — no more than 33 words – and names the person who is to be the recipient of the message. The werewolf need not know the person personally, but must at least know the recipient’s name.

The blood forms into a large raven-spirit, black-feathered but with red eyes and a scarlet cast to its plumage when the light catches at certain angles. It is not a true spirit, merely a simulacrum created by the ritual, but is capable of flight in the Shadow like a true raven-spirit, and can cross the Gauntlet to or from the physical world in order to deliver its message. When the raven-spirit arrives at the named person, it alights on their shoulder (regardless of witnesses or location) and caws loudly. The recipient of the message understands these caws perfectly, hearing the ritemaster’s message in the croaky sounds. The raven waits for 33 seconds to hear any reply to the message, which the raven will carry back to the ritemaster and deliver. If no reply is forthcoming in that time, or after the raven has delivered the message back to the ritemaster, the spirit lands on the ground and becomes nothing more than a small patch of the werewolf’s blood.

Cost: None
Action Extended (10 successes, each roll is one minute.) The werewolf takes 1B per roll.

When enough successes are reached, the raven-spirit takes a message of no more than 33 words to the recipient, travelling no further than 1 mile per success. Upon an ES, it may travel up to 2 miles per success. The raven-spirit may enter the Shadow, the Twilight, or the Hedge.

Suggested Modifiers
+1 Recipient is well-known to the ritemaster.
+1 Recipient has tasted the ritemaster’s blood.
-1 Recipient has never met the ritemaster.
Scarlet Messenger
3rd
Shadow Projection
Werewolves are naturally attuned to the Shadow and can enter it physically with relative ease. There are times, though, when bodily traveling into the spirit world is less than desirable, either because of danger or because a werewolf’s presence there would agitate the local spirits or alert a pack’s enemies. This rite, adapted from similar rituals employed by mortal shamans, allows a werewolf to project her consciousness from her body and into the Shadow in the guise of a wolf-spirit.

Performing the Rite: Seating herself in the middle of a ritual circle, the Ithaeur ingests a natural hallucinogen like peyote or agaric (this is largely a symbolic gesture as a werewolf’s metabolism quickly purges most drugs from her system) and beats out a quick, rhythmic tattoo on a drum, tom-tom, or even just her own thighs. As she attains a trance state, her spirit half slips loose from her physical body and crosses the Gauntlet, manifesting in the form of a wolf-spirit.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals
Action: Extended (20 successes; each roll represents 10 minutes)

While the werewolf is in the Shadow Realm in this form, she is treated as though she were in Urhan form for all purposes (including Trait modifiers, restrictions on actions or communication, and the like). However, spirits and other beings in the Shadow Realm perceive her as an ordinary wolf-spirit, not an Uratha. An opposed roll of Power (Wits + Occult for non-spirits) versus Wits + Primal Urge is required to see through the deception. Her Rank appears to be the same as her Renown grants her (see Werewolf: The Forsaken p. 272).

While projecting in this form, the werewolf is somewhat insulated from actual, physical damage. Any bashing or lethal damage inflicted on the character’s ephemeral body is recorded as bashing damage on her physical body, as bruises appear on her flesh. Aggravated damage inflicted on the werewolf’s ephemeral body appears on her physical body as lethal harm. If an ephemeral character is knocked unconscious by this damage, she automatically returns to her body.

The werewolf’s ephemeral body can move around normally in the Shadow Realm, walking and running at normal Speed. During the time she is mentally projected, the ritemaster’s body is alive but comatose and her soul has actually separated from the body. She has no way of knowing her body’s current state of health or any other information about it. Should her body die while psychically projected, she gradually loses her memories and sense of self over a number of days equal to 10 minus her Primal Urge. At the end of this time, she loses all recollection of herself and becomes a true wolf-spirit.

If the character’s ephemeral body is destroyed (her Health track is filled with aggravated damage), her
physical body lapses into a coma from which she never awakens.

This rite can only be performed at a locus. It lasts as long as the ritualist desires (but see the rules for deprivation on pp. 175–176 of the World of Darkness Rulebook). Ending the rite is a reflexive action, but the werewolf’s ephemeral form must be within the area of a locus (not necessarily the one her body is at).
Shadow Projection,
Information Gestalt
With this Ritual, the werewolf has developed an inner sight so powerful that it can actually catch glimpses of the future. The character enters a meditative trance, clearing her mind of everything but darkness in order to welcome the visions. She might receive warning of an impending attack, foretell the arrival of a potential ally or even watch a betrayal unfold before it happens. Viewing the future accurately is impossible, though. No vision is guaranteed to come true. Worse, visions gained are more often signs of ominous events than they are promises of good fortune. Whether this is because the Ritual’s “eyesight” is through a dark lens, or simply a cold reflection of the hard truths of a werewolf’s existence, none can say.

A seer is unaware of events surrounding her while she is in a trance. She is, however, aware of anything that touches or affects her body directly. A character may not attempt Information Gestalt more than once in any 24-hour period.

Performing the Ritual: The werewolf enters into a meditative trance while watching multiple television screens, all tuned to different channels.

Cost: 1E per success
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual
Action: Extended (15 successes required; each roll represents one minute spent in a trance)

Success: The character catches a glimpse of a potential event in her near future — anywhere from 24 hours to one week. The vision lasts for roughly a turn’s worth of viewing — enough time to watch a man gun down a packmate, a car carrying a loved one swerve and crash or an elder hail a dangerous spirit. The vision is usually clear enough to make out details, though the details might be misleading. For example, a body face-down in the river, wearing a packmate’s jacket, might turn out be the corpse of a friend who borrowed the jacket. This Gift is a means of gaining a potential warning, nothing more.
Exceptional Success: The vision lasts for up to a minute.
Information Gestalt,
Bind Spirit
It allows a werewolf to bind a spirit to a single location or to prevent a particular spirit from entering a single location. Bind Spirit is very common; most experienced Ithaeur know a variation of it. This same rite can be used to bind a spirit into a particular part of the Shadow or the physical world. As a result, the spirit cannot leave its immediate area, not even to cross the Gauntlet. Werewolves who know this rite can use it in a preparatory fashion for a spirit they haven’t yet summoned into the physical world, or against a spirit already manifest in the real world or against a spirit in the Shadow if the ritualist is already in the spirit world.

The ritualist must provide for a single means of escape from the bond, and he must express that means to at least two others — neither of whom have to be the bound spirit. The means of escape can be all but impossible, but it cannot be a true logical impossibility. Frequently, the means of escape is phrased as, “Once you perform the following task to the best of your ability, you will be free…” (e.g., “Once you successfully teach me the following Gift…”).

Performing the Rite: Werewolves know dozens of variations on this rite, and most experienced Ithaeur create their own versions, which they then pass on to students. The most common version — not an ancient one, but one that has become quite popular in the last few decades — requires the ritualist to draw a chalk circle around the fringes of a room or glade before summoning the spirit. Creating the circle requires 20 successes on an extended Intelligence + Occult roll. Each roll represents one minute of work. The circle is marked with dozens of Uratha claw-sigils, and a complex half-howling chant is performed before the spirit is summoned. Once the spirit has been summoned into the circle (via an appropriate rite, such as Summon Gaffling), the werewolf must complete the last notes of the howl before the spirit realizes what is going on and escapes.

To bind a spirit that is already present, the ritualist may be able to complete the aforementioned circle in secret. For example, a particularly clever werewolf might be able to convince a night-spirit that the circle he is drawing represents the spirit’s “star chart.” If that cannot be done — it isn’t likely, Luna knows — he must somehow wrap the rite’s subject three times in silvered thread (which is impossible to do in the material world) and then perform the aforementioned chant. That silvered thread can easily be broken until the third loop is complete. After that, it cannot be broken at all unless the ritualist makes a mistake in the chant. In the physical world, a spirit may be encircled by physically holding its host on the spot.

This rite doesn’t work on ghosts.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual versus the subject’s Resistance
Action Instanct (Once the circle is prepared)

If the most successes are rolled for the ritemaster. The spirit is successfully bound and cannot break free except under a few circumstances:
• If the ritualist that binds the spirit releases it with the phrase, “I release you” or its equivalent.
• If the binding circle is broken or the silver thread is snapped by an outside force.
• The ritemaster must designate one other way that the spirit can be freed, and he must express this method to at
least two other entities within an hour of the spirit’s binding. One of those two may be the spirit, but it doesn’t have to be.

Upon an Exceptional Success, the ritemaster may also strip 1 Essence from the spirit and use it to replenish his own pool.
Bind Spirit,
Bind Human

There are two main functions to this rite: to secure a location against unwanted human intrusion and to bind a human to a particular location. Neither variant ritual is entirely foolproof even against a human who knows no magic. Humans aren’t bound by bans as spirits are, and their actions simply cannot be as constrained as spirits’ can be.

When this rite is used to bind a person to a given location, the ritemaster must provide for a single means of escape from the bond, and he must express that means to at least two others — neither of whom have to be the bound mortal. The means of escape can be all but impossible, but it cannot be a true logical impossibility. Usually, the means of escape is phrased as, “Once you have accomplished this task for me, you may depart.”

When used to secure a location against mortal intrusion, no “password” is required, although the ritemaster may choose to nominate a specific action that allows a human to pass through normally. For example, a werewolf might set up a ward that bars all humans save those who carry a crow feather somewhere on their person, and then gives a crow feather to his wolf-blooded lover in the event that she needs to reach him.

The ward isn’t directly evident save when a human attempts to cross it. The human feels a faint nausea, a headache, a sense of vertigo or even a combination of such unpleasant sensations. The subject is unable to step beyond the area unless he successfully resists the ward’s effects.

Performing the Rite: To secure an area against mortal intrusion, the werewolf takes a form that has claws and uses them to draw a series of sigils (using a muddy mixture of water and ash) on every path of entry into the area. In a built structure, this includes doors and windows. Outdoors, the sigils are repeated every few meters to form a rough boundary around the area.

To keep a mortal bound in an area, the werewolf uses his claws and a muddy mixture of earth and water, but this time he must clearly mark out the precise boundaries of the area, putting the sigils on the inside of the boundary.

In either case, the affected area cannot be larger than a radius of 50 yards. A werewolf may typically use this ritual to bind a human inside a house or within a campsite, or to ward a small building.

Cost: None
Action: Extended (20 successes, each roll is ten minutes)

The first time the mortal attempts to pass, a Resolve + Occult roll is made at a penalty equal to half the ritemaster’s Harmony (rounded up). One die is added to this roll for ghouls and other supernatural humans. Mages may add their appropriate resistance trait as usual. Vampires, Ridden and other supernatural creatures that are no longer human are immune to the rite’s effects. The roll made for the human may gain one to three dice if the stated terms of passing are directly against the mortal’s moral code, although no dice are gained if the terms are merely unpleasant. “You may not leave until you have deleted all the files you possess that mention us, from whatever secure location they might be” provides no bonus dice, while “You may not leave until you kill your infant son” does. If the roll for the mortal succeeds, he’s free. Otherwise he cannot try to escape again for another hour (and he can try again every hour after that, if he keeps failing). When the mortal tries again, he receives a cumulative –1 penalty for every attempt after the first (though this penalty can never exceed –5).

A binding typically lasts for 24 hours, although Essence may be spent for the ritemaster to increase the duration. Each point increases the binding’s duration for another 24 hours. The ritemaster may dismiss the binding as an instant action by erasing a portion of the boundary with a claw.
Bind Human,
Call Jaggling
This rite is a more powerful version of Call Gaffling. Jagglings are more independent and powerful spirits than Gafflings, and are more likely to resist the sweet summons of chiminage. And yet, a Jaggling servant — even a temporary one — is a valuable tool for any werewolf, so this ritual is a valued tool among Ithaeur.

Performing the Rite: This rite is very similar to Call Gaffling, but the ritualist must provide richer chiminage, and his howl of summons must be customized to the type of Jaggling he wishes to summon. A common howl of summoning doesn’t suffice. If the werewolf wants a stag-spirit, he must howl a specific call to the Children of Stag. The rite takes around several minutes to perform.

Cost: None
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual versus the subject’s Resistance
Action Contested and Extended (50 successes, each roll is one minute.)

First to gather 50 successes is the victor. In the event of an Exceptional Success on any specific roll, all subsequent rolls by the opponent suffer a -1 penalty.

Suggested Modifiers
+2 Chiminage is very valuable to the spirit
[b]+1 Spirit is particularly disposed toward ritemaster’s tribe or auspice (an Elunim answering an Elodoth’s rite, a war-spirit answering a Rahu’s rite)
+1 Chiminage is particularly valuable to the spirit
+1 or more The werewolf outranks the spirit*
–1 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit
–3 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit from one mile away
–5 Attempting to summon a specific individual spirit from 10 miles away
Call Jaggling,
Grave’s Bounty
This ritual allows Rakesh to consume the spiritual resonance of a grave, and gain essence for it.

Performing the Rite: The werewolf sits in front of the grave, lays a palm on the monument and makes a silent invocation to Death Wolf. She also thanks the person who lies there interred (it is customary to lay flowers on the grave at some point
in the future, but this isn’t required for the rite). The werewolf then scrapes a bit of dust or dirt from the headstone and places the dirt under her tongue. If the rite works, she feels a sudden influx of emotion — grief, pain, loss and even joy, depending on what sorts of emotions the monument has absorbed.

The werewolf can attempt this rite more than once in the same night in the same graveyard, but this carries some serious risks (see below).

Cost: None
Action: Instant

Upon a success, the werewolf gains a number of Essence points equal to the successes the player rolled. She can try to gain more Essence by performing the rite on a different headstone, but she runs the risk of offending the spirit of the graveyard. For every successful attempt at this rite after the first, the player rolls Manipulation + Occult. If this roll fails, the graveyard-spirit attacks the werewolf’s Essence directly, turning it into caustic, black nothingness. The character suffers one point of aggravated damage per point of Essence she has gained from this rite while in that particular graveyard on that night.

Suggested Modifiers
+2 The character attended the funeral of the person interred in the grave
+1 The grave has flowers laid during that day (by someone who know the deceased personally).
+1 For every dot of the Fame rating the deceased had at the time of death.
-1 The deceased has been dead for more than 5 years.
–2 The deceased has been dead for more than 10 years.
–3 The deceased has been dead for more than 20 years.
–4 The deceased has been dead for more than 50 years.
–5 The deceased has been dead for more than 100 years.
Rite of Grave’s Bounty,
Wake the Spirit
According to werewolf lore, everything has a spirit. Every object, every idea, everything has a spirit, down to the barest sliver of a thought or a single-celled organism. But though there are many spirits active in the world, the great majority are ‘dormant’, but with this rite they can be awoken, ‘summoning’ a new spirit into existence.

Waking a spirit can be a dangerous gamble, as the newly awakened spirit feels no obligation or gratitude to the ritemaster. A spirit that’s been awakened by this rite acts according to its nature — no more, no less. A werewolf might be able to convince the newly awakened spirit of a car to give its earthly analogue a measure of its power simply for the ecstasy of racing at high speeds, but an awakened flame-spirit might be as dangerous to the werewolf as to her enemies. Yet awakening a spirit gives a werewolf a new potential resource from which to draw. A werewolf can awaken the spirit of a murder weapon to question the spirit about its former owner, for instance.

Performing the Rite: The ritemaster drums, chants, dances or performs some other form of rhythmic noise and motion as she moves about the object or place to be awakened. The culmination of the rite is a loud howl, which is meant to shake the spirit free of sleep.

Cost: None
Action Extended (15 successes, each roll is one minute.)

When 15 or more are accumulated and the rite is performed on a mundane item or place, it wakes the potential spirit within. The item then possesses a spirit analogue in the Shadow Realm.

When performed on an animal, this ritual “wakes” a Gaffling related to that animal in the spirit world. The Gaffling isn’t directly connected to the animal in question, though, and it doesn’t have to remain in the animal’s area. For example, performing the rite on a Doberman pinscher wakes a dog-spirit that might not necessarily look like a Doberman.

A newly awakened spirit is always a Rank 1 Gaffling with average traits for its class (see p. 279). The rite cannot be performed on sentient creatures such as humans, or on objects or animals that already have awakened spirits associated with them. The ritemaster gains a +1 to all rolls to influence the newly woken spirit, including Gifts and rites, for the duration of the scene in which this rite is performed. Although the spirit doesn’t always show gratitude, it’s usually slightly suggestible for the first few hours of its existence.
Wake the Spirit
4th
Long, complex ritual, but the relevant bit is that Rakesh can make fetishes at the XP normal cost.
Fetish Rite,
Power in Words
Uratha in the Lodge of Words know the power of the root of language, and can focus the richness and diversity of words themselves to a greater purpose. Therefore, Power in Words remains one of the Modernists’ most powerful tools, not because of the rite’s raw might but because of its seemingly infinite versatility in a myriad of situations (just as language itself, the Modernists argue).

Performing the Rite: To perform this rite, the ritualist pricks his finger and writes a single verb on a piece of parchment, paper or something similar, and then swallows that piece of paper — in essence, making the word “part” of him. During this time, the ritualist also repeats that word over and over in his mind (and aloud, if he wishes), making it a nonstop mantra. Since speed can often be of the essence when forming this rite, many Modernists who make frequent use of Power in Words will keep their thumbnail pointed and sharpened, so they can prick their index finger at will.

Cost: 1 Essence
Action Instant

Success: By invoking this rite, the Uratha declares a concept using a single verb (such as “attack” or “research”). For the duration of the scene, the werewolf invokes the power behind that word, channeling energy off it and related verbs by saying them aloud. Each verb or verb phrase so invoked gives a bonus to one action; this bonus depends on the relationship between the original word and the new one.

+3 Direct synonym (the relationship between “hit” and “punch”)
+2 Closely related (the relationship between “attack” and “kick”)
+1 Tangentially related (the relationship between “kick” and “punch”)

Using words that are completely unrelated (such as the relationship between “toss” and “punch”) or not verbs (“aggression”) will not bestow any bonus. Each word can only be used once with an activation of the rite. Verb phrases can be used, provided none of the words have been used previously for the activation of the rite (for example, “sucker-punch” could be a closely related synonym to “attack,” but the Uratha could not later on use “punch” or “sucker-hit”). The verb used to activate Power in Words is merely a reference point and does not provide any bonus.

For example, Slade Names-the-Darkness is looking for clues at a crime scene and he invokes Power in Words, declaring “investigate.” Each Investigation check takes 10 minutes, and Slade will be spending one hour searching the crime scene (six rolls). Slade utters “search” as the first synonym; the Storyteller rules this is a direct synonym and grants a +3 bonus to that check. Ten minutes later, Slade says, “seek”; this grants a +3 bonus to that check. For the four remaining checks Slade uses “look,” “comb,” “peer” and “sift,” granting +3, +1, +2 and +0 to the remaining rolls.

Although invoked words don’t need to be shouted, they do need to be said at a conversational level, and the Uratha must be able to speak to utilize this rite. Only one version of this rite may be active for a werewolf during a scene.
Exceptional Success: The rite lasts the duration of the scene or until the next sunrise or sunset, whichever is longer.
Power in Words,
Obon Temae
This rite, based somewhat on the Japanese tea-drinking “tray ceremony,” allows a werewolf to force a single yokai to sit with her for a time. The two share ritually-prepared food or drink, and neither can commit violence against the other during that time (provided, of course, the ritual was successful). This ritual also forces the spirit to communicate certain information to the ritemaster. The type of information and story that the spirit must deliver is based upon the type of food chosen for the ritual — and only one type of victual or drink is allowed per ceremony (see below for the types of meal and what they demand a spirit do). The ritual is certainly not foolproof; it doesn’t guarantee concrete answers, but it does force a being to calm itself for a time, and may allow a werewolf just enough opportunity to learn more about the entity, and earn its trust over time.

Performing the Rite: This ritual has two steps. The first step is the preparation of the meal. Each meal requires an extended Intelligence + Occult roll to prepare. Twenty successes are required for each, with each roll taking one minute’s worth of time. A single “meal” consists of an individual item: for instance, one blood-filled, sticky rice cake (ketsueki daifuku) counts as one meal and requires 20 successes to create. One point of Essence is also required for each meal.

These meals can be made ahead of time, and last for a full week before rotting or decaying. They can also be carried through to the Shadow from the physical world; crossing the Gauntlet with one or many meals for the ceremony, however, incurs a –1 (non-cumulative) penalty to the roll for stepping sideways. The ritemaster can prepare five different common types of meal for the yokai (though more are said to exist). The meals and their effects upon spirits are as follows:

Ketsueki Daifuku: This is a round or square mochi (glutinous rice cake) filled with blood (the ritemaster’s own). For every cake given to a spirit, the spirit must answer one question about what it eats (what it likes to eat, hates to eat, bad things it has consumed, other spirits it has swallowed, etc.).
Sukin Dango: This dumpling (made of mochiko or rice flour) is steamed or fried and stuffed with some of the ritemaster’s own skin and meat. Many ritemasters use their teeth or a knife to get the golf ball-sized hunk of flesh necessary to fill the dough. For every dumpling given to a yokai, the being must answer one question about who it has spoken with over the last 24 hours. (The werewolf may ask who the creature has spoken with, what topics were discussed and the time and places of such conversations.)
Koicha Chishio: This “thick” tea is a syrupy beverage flavored with three drops of the ritemaster’s blood and some of her saliva. The tea can be served in bowls or glasses. For every serving of tea, the ritemaster may ask the spirit a question about its powers (what it is capable of, how often, if it has used its abilities recently, what Gifts it can teach, etc.).
Sakana no Ikizukuri: This is a five-to-ten-inch fish stuck with two skewers (often made of bamboo). The ritemaster must pluck one of his own teeth from his mouth and stuff it into the belly of the fish. The fish is not cooked (and is often served alive). The yokai must answer one question (per fish served) about spirit politics. (The werewolf may ask about power blocs, choirs, rivalries and rank.)
Pa-Ji Basashi: The ritemaster marinates raw horsemeat briefly in a bowl of her own bile (she must make herself throw up if necessary). With each of these delicacies, the ritemaster may ask one question pertaining to a location in the Shadow (the location of a loci, of the suspected location of another spirit, the direction toward a specific locale or even where other Forsaken went).

The second part of the ritual is invoking it against an individual yokai. This ability works on spirits, Ridden, Hosts and ghosts. (It does not work on vampires, mages or other oni.) When invoking the ritual, the ritemaster merely needs to bring out the food and set one of the meals down before the creature.
Obon

Cost: 1 Essence per "meal" prepared
Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals vs. Resistance (or Resolve+Supernatural Advantage); Apply Rank differences
Action Instant (once food has been prepared)

Success: The yokai is bound to a 10-yard radius around the meal laid out by the ritemaster. The ritemaster must stay within 10 yards of the meal, as well, or the ritual ends.

The ritemaster may, as noted above, ask one question per meal served. Only one type of meal may be served during this ceremony. In other words, the ritemaster may not lay down a rice cake and then follow it up with a bowl of tea. Bringing new food means she must perform the ritual anew (making the Harmony+Ritual roll against the yokai’s Resistance). (Note that any of the questions asked will be answered honestly by the spirit — but honesty does not imply accuracy. The spirit may have incorrect information, and will pass that misinformation along as gospel truth.) The spirit is bound to the area for one hour per meal. The ritemaster may only put down one meal (and ask one question) per hour.

The spirit does not necessarily need to eat the meal (though many do). The ritemaster, similarly, does not need to consume any of the prepared food or drink. The food must only be present. At the end of the hour, whatever is left of a single meal collapses into mold and dust.

If at any time the ritemaster decides to leave the 10-yard radius around the meal, the ritual ends. Also, the ritemaster may not bring violence against the entity targeted by the rite. Doing so costs a Willpower point (while the ritual remains active), and also ends the ritual prematurely.

Exceptional Success: The most successes (five or more) are rolled for the ritemaster. The werewolf may ask one additional question per meal (two total per meal).
Temae,
Rite of the Shadowed Hunt
This rite allows a werewolf to open a gateway into the Underworld.

Performing the Rite: This rite can only be performed at an Avernian Gate, or at a locus with an appropriately death-like resonance. The ritemaster stands before the gate or locus, and makes an offering to Death Wolf. This offering must involve a living sacrifice, but any living creature, even a mouse, will do. The werewolf then draws the First Tongue sigils for “death” and “crossing” in the victim’s blood, and sits in silence until the gate opens.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals
Action Extended (20 successes needed; each roll requires one minute of meditation)

Success: Successes are added to the total. If the player reaches 20 successes, the gateway opens to the Underworld, and remains open for one hour per dot of the ritemaster’s Harmony. It cannot be closed early, and once open it admits anyone to the Underworld.

Exceptional Success: Considerable successes are added to the total. If the ritemaster concludes the rite with an exceptional success, Luna sees the rite in progress but acknowledges that it must be so. She sends a Lune to watch the gate and make sure no one but the pack members (and any allies they designate) enter it.
Rite of the Shadowed Hunt,
Rite of Slaying the Truth
Some secrets should remain secret. But information, the Bone Shadows note, seeks to flow into places of lesser concentration. This means that people seem to have a way of learning things that they shouldn't, and sometimes it rankles the werewolves’ consciences that someone who learned a truth that they cannot be allowed to possess should die for it. This is especially true if the offending person isn’t a scholar or an investigator, but just a normal human who picked up the wrong book or turned down the wrong path.

Performing the Rite: The target needs to be present and unconscious for this rite to work. Normally, the Uratha drug the target or abduct him while he sleeps. The ritualist and any assistants have to work in complete silence — even a cough will disrupt the rite. They surround the sleeping target and trace glyphs in the air above his body, and then release a small insect onto his skin. The insect becomes infused with the power of the rite, buries into the target’s ear and poisons the spirit of the targeted memory. The spirit then dies and is absorbed into the target’s body. The target awakens a few hours later, but has no recollection of whatever event or knowledge the werewolf removed. Of course, the werewolves need to make sure that the target doesn't simply relearn the secret.

Dice Pool: Harmony+Rituals vs. Resolve+Composure
Action Extended and Contested (30 successes; each roll represents five minutes)

Success: Progress is made toward the goal. If the ritualist reaches 30 successes before the target, the spirit-insect kills the spirit-memory, the information disappears and the target awakens in the morning feeling confused but otherwise intact.

Exceptional Success: Significant progress is made toward the goal. If the ritualist reaches the goal with 35+ successes, the target “smoothes out” his own memory. The information disappears, but the target has no lost time, holes in events or incongruous recollections that would tip him off that something is wrong.

Modifier Situation
+3 Subject already suffers from amnesia of some time.
+1 Ritualist has a Medicine Specialty in Neurology.
–1 Subject has never seen the ritualist’s face.
–3 Ritualist does not possess the Medicine Skill.
Rite of Slaying the Truth,
Shadow Play
This costly rite calls upon the reflection of a loca-tion to replay a portion of its spiritual lifespan. With this rite, ritualists can often learn of events or times when a particular place had a different resonance or of tragedies that occurred there in the past. Though the rite has the power to reach back for centuries, it levies a terrible cost to do so. Because of the allegorical nature of the Shadow, it doesn’t give definitive answers to questions like, who burned down the old Phillips house? Such a question would be answered only if the arsonists somehow struck from the Shadow — such as using a fire elemental to com-mit the crime from the other side of the Gauntlet — and, even then, only the fire elemental might be revealed. What the rite does show is how the place’s reflection has changed over time in the Shadow.

Performing the Rite: The performance of this rite must take place in the reflection of a location in the Shad-ow. The ritualist first demarks the boundary of the area she wishes to perform the shadow play for her — leaving chiminage to the local spirits at key points. Then she per-forms a ritual howl and lapses into a trance. While others in the spirit world begin to see strange bands of distortion, they do not see the shadow play itself — the vision is only granted to the ritualist.

Cost: 1E per success
Dice Pool: Harmony+Ritual
Action: Extended (1 to 100 successes, depending on Essence spent). Each roll represents five minutes.

Success: Successes are gained. Each success allows the ritualist to replay five years of change in roughly five minutes at the cost of one Essence. This is not like a CD playback in which the user has full control to stop, start, search and pause the shadow play once it starts. While she can attempt to search for particularly significant events (ones that would have generated Essence flavored with a particular resonance, for example), it is very difficult to control precisely.
Exceptional Success: An exceptional success replays 50 years of past occurrences for merely one Essence.

Modifier Situation
+2 Chiminage is very valuable to local spirits and/ or connected to the events the ritemaster is interested in.
+1 The area has some connection to the ritemaster, such as within her territory.
+1 The area has a particularly strong reflection in the spirit world.
+1 The ritualist is a Cahalith.
+1 Chiminage is valuable to local spirits.
+0 The area is equivalent to a large room.
–1 The area is equivalent to a house.
–2 The ritemaster is attempting to locate a particular event.
–2 The area is equivalent to a building.
–4 The area is equivalent to a city block.
Shadow Play

Sorcery:
Darkling Grasp (Shadow ••)

Shadows have memories, you know. They remember every object, every creature, every-thing that ever created them. As the witch grows more capable in her dealings with shadows, she finds she can physically reach into them and retrieve those memories.

Cost: 1 Willpower
Action: Instant
Duration: Scene
Range: Touch
Dice Pool: Composure + Occult + Primal Urge

With success on the casting roll the witch may pull objects constructed of pure darkness out of the shadows and into the material Realm. The witch can pull almost any simple object she can think of (anything that has ever cast a shadow), with a Size no greater than her Primal Urge rating from the shadows. These objects are solid, yet fragile and will always have a Structure and Durability of one. Objects retrieved from the shadows remain in the material Realm for 24 hours or until destroyed, at which time they revert to shadow. If sunlight ever fully falls on a shadow object, it is immediately destroyed. Shadow objects intentionally destroyed by the witch grant her Source. Objects cannot involve complex machinery: a shadow-knife is appropriate, but a shadow-pistol isn’t.

Darkling Grasp (Shadow ••),
Darkened Countenace (Shadow •••)

At this stage in her training the shadows seem to stretch and lengthen, to reach out to the witch of their own accord. The witch accepts the embrace of the shadows gratefully and can weave them into mask and cloak to hide her from prying eyes.

Cost: 1 Willpower
Action: Instant
Duration: Scene
Range: Sensory
Dice Pool: Composure + Stealth + Primal Urge

With success on the casting roll the witch gathers the shadows around her like a finely-woven garment. The witch becomes nearly invisible to the eye and no recording device of any kind will register her presence. Not only do the shadows hide the witch from view, they also muffl e any sounds she might make with a downy blanket of darkness. For the remainder of the scene the witch gains a +3 bonus to all Stealth rolls and any effort made by onlookers to spot the witch (by means mundane or magical) suffers a penalty equal to the witch’s Gnosis. The spell will only break early if the witch engages in violent action of some kind (like attacking someone).
Darkened Countenance (Shadow •••)

Willpower:
Base (8) + Shadow Tarot (1 effectively)
9
Harmony: 5
Virtue: Prudence
Vice: Envy

Initiative: 10 (10/11/12/12/12) (+3 w/ Charm)
Defense: 3 (3/4/5/5/5) (+1 w/ Charm; +2 vs. Firearms w/ Father Wolf's Speed)
Health: 9 (11/13/12+1/9+1/16)
Armor: 1/1 in Gauru, 2/1 in Primal Form
Size: 5 (6/7/6+1/4+1/8)
Speed: 11 (12+1/15+2/18+2/16+3/20+2) (+2 w/ Vermin's Flight Necklace; x2 w/ Father Wolf's Speed),

176+((54+48+48+48+24)+(28+7+14)+(30+5+7+12+15)+(10+10+10+6+6+6+3+3+3+30)+(6+12))+(25+15+45 +55+10)+(12 +135+60+36+9+15)+(4+36+6+6+12+45+2+6+12)
1167


Starting Merits: PU 6, Resources 1
Starting Renown: Wisdom 3
Starting Gifts: Death Sight, Heart of Things, Befuddle

Primal Urge 3->7 = 176

Wisdom 3->5 = 54
Free Gift: Skin-Stealing; Forbidden Knowledge
Cunning 0->3 = 48
Free Gift: Partial-Change; Anybeast; Technology Ward
Glory 0->3 = 48
Free Gift: Two World Eyes; Ghost Knife; Luck-Eating
Purity 0->3 = 48
Free Gift: Wolf-Blood's Lure; Father Wolf's Speed; Corpse-Witness
Honor 0->2 = 24
Free Gift: Shadow Speaking; Read Spirit

Primal Form 5 = 25+3 = 28
Mask of Rage 1 = 7
Hone Rage 2 = 14

Rituals 0->4 = 30 XP
1st Rites: Rite of Dedication, Call Beast, Chiminage, Ritual Mind, Spirit's Promise, Preserving the Trail = 6-1=5 XP
2nd Rites: Call Gaffling, Rouse the Fetish, Doom Strike, Curse of Shadows, Echoes of the Truth, Banish Spirit, Scarlet Messenger, Spirit Conveyance = 8-1=7 XP
3rd Rites: Bind Spirit, Bind Human, Call Jaggling, Information Gestalt, Shadow Projection, Rite of Grave's Bounty, Wake the Spirit, = 7-1= 12 XP
4th Rites: Fetish Rite, Shadow Play, Power in Words, Obon Temae, Rite of the Shadowed Hunt, Rite of Slaying the Truth = 7-1= 18 XP

Strength 1->3 = 25
Dexterity 2->3 = 15
Wits 1->4 = 45
Intelligence 4->6 = 55
Manipulation 1->2 = 10

Brawl 3->4 = 12
Investigation, Occult, Academics 5 = 135
Subterfuge, Survival 0->4 = 60
Medicine, Athletics 0->3 = 36
Expression, Politics, Animal Ken 0->1 = 9
Specialty 5 = 15

Resources 1->2 = 4 XP
----LOST one dot.
Russell House (Size 3, Security 2, Library 3, Ritual Area 2) = 36 XP
Toxin Resistance 2 = 6
Fast Reflexes 2 = 6
Shadow Cult Initiation (Harbingers) 3 = 12
Personal Totem 5 = 30+15 extra=45
Emotional Detachment 1 = 2
Languages (Chinese, First Tongue, Welsh) = 6
Mobile Locus (2-dots) 3 = 12

Fetishes
--Salmon Charm 4 = 10
--Off-Switch Tattoo 4 = 10
--Traveller's Blanket 4 = 10
--Woad Tattoo 3 = 6
--Death Wolf's Howl 3 = 6
--Talens (9) 3 = 6
--Shadow Tarot 2 = 3
--Protective Charm x3 = 3
--Vermin's Flight Necklace 2 = 3
--Alphaskin 5 = 30

Sorcery
--Shadow 2: Darkling Grasp = 6
--Shadow 3: Darkened Countenance = 12

***********************************************************
(40+5+22+13+14+17+26+10+32+34+36+26+26+24)+(29+22+26+44+38+26+53+90+125+67+53)+(100+62)+(1 66)
1226

Starting = 40 XP

Harmony 7->6 = 5 XP

January, 2010 = 22
February, 2010 = 13
March, 2010 = 14
April, 2010 = 17
May, 2010 = 26
June, 2010 = 10
July, 2010 = 32
August, 2010 = 34
September, 2010 = 36
October, 2010 = 26
November, 2010 = 26
December, 2010 = 24

January, 2011 = 29
February, 2011 = 22
March/April, 2011 = 26
May, 2011 = 44
June, 2011 = 38
July, 2011 = 26
August, 2011 = 53
September, 2011 = 90
October, 2011 = 125
November, 2011 = 67
December, 2011 = 53

January, 2012 = 100
February, 2012 = 62

NPCs (129+16+21) = 166

******************************************************************************
Auspice: Crescent Moon, Elemental, Shaping, Witch's Moon, Wisdom
Tribe: Death, Insight, Warding, Ending
Universal: Father Wolf, Mother Luna

Good Affinity Gifts:
1st - Sense Malice (Insight 1 -- odd but possibly useful), Shadow-Speaking (Witch's Moon 1 - odd and probably not useful, but looks impressive and is cheap), Fear of Death (Ending 1 -- situationally useful)
2nd - Father Wolf's Speed (Father Wolf 2 -- highly useful), Scent of Taint (Insight 2 - not bad, though clunky), Ruin (Shaping 2 -- weird but might be useful)
3rd -Control Fire (Elemental 3 -- situationally useful, impinges on Michael's turf a little), Sculpt (Shaping 3 -- weird but might be useful),
4th -Invoke the Wind's Wrath (Elemental 4 -- impressive and powerful, but underwhelming dice pool), Savage Rending (Father Wolf 4 -- decent), Soul Read (Insight 4 -- very powerful verging on 'over'), Master's Counsel (Wisdom 4 -- very good buff... for other people)
5th -- apparently all of Rakesh's 5th rank affinity gifts suck


Good Rites:
Rite of Fair Warning (at a -1)
Rite of the Dizzying Wind
Rite of the Hunter's Howl (At a -2)

Good Fetishes:
Ghost Stake
Hide Paper (Talen)
Fortune Stone
The Four of Us
Soundthrower (Talen)
Liar's Delight
Spirit's Dream to





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