Difference between revisions of "World:DC: Legacy/House Rules"

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(Henchmen)
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Non-minions can make attack checks against Henchmen as routine checks
 
Non-minions can make attack checks against Henchmen as routine checks
  
If a Henchman fails a resistance check, the degree of failure the Henchman suffers is increased by 1 degree. So a Henchman failing a Damage resistance check by 1 degree, for example, is dazed until the end of their next turn and has a –1 circumstance penalty to further checks against damage, rather than just a –1 circumstance penalty to further checks against damage
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If a Henchman fails a resistance check, the degree of failure the Henchman suffers is increased by 1 degree. So a Henchman failing a Damage resistance check by 1 degree, for example, is dazed until the end of their next turn and has a –1 circumstance penalty to further checks against damage, rather than just a –1 circumstance penalty to further checks against damage.
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Henchmen still get resistance checks against critical hits.
  
 
Henchmen are treated like minions for advantages or traits related to minions (such as Takedown)
 
Henchmen are treated like minions for advantages or traits related to minions (such as Takedown)

Revision as of 16:38, 10 November 2012

Contents

Advantages

Improved Critical: No more than 3 ranks can be purchased for any given attack.

Effects

Concealment: Visual Concealment must be limited in some fashion (Passive or Resistible are the two suggested Flaws to consider)

Henchmen

Henchmen are a form of advanced minions. They are tougher than normal minions, but still not as tough as a villain. The following rules apply to Henchmen:

Henchmen cannot score critical hits against non-minions

Non-minions can make attack checks against Henchmen as routine checks

If a Henchman fails a resistance check, the degree of failure the Henchman suffers is increased by 1 degree. So a Henchman failing a Damage resistance check by 1 degree, for example, is dazed until the end of their next turn and has a –1 circumstance penalty to further checks against damage, rather than just a –1 circumstance penalty to further checks against damage.

Henchmen still get resistance checks against critical hits.

Henchmen are treated like minions for advantages or traits related to minions (such as Takedown)

Hero Point Tradeoff

Run into that situation where you really need a hero point, but have none left? In such instances, the GM may choose to apply the following option: a player may ask the GM for a hero point in exchange for a complication to follow immediately after that point is used. In essence, the player is “borrowing on credit” and “paying” for the hero point with the complication. Hero points acquired in this way can be spent normally.

Knockback

When a character is stuck with a critical hit by an attack that requires a Toughness resistance check the target struck may be knocked back. The character can choose to use either their dodge (rolling with the momentum of the blow) or their toughness (overpowering the blow) and subtract that value from the rank of the Effect they were hit with to determine the value of the knockback. Once this value is determined, reference the Measurements Table to check the distance the character is knocked back.

Knockback = Effect - Dodge or Toughness - Modifiers

Modifiers are things such as Growth or any effect that increases mass or density.

Example: Aquagirl is struck by a blow that scores a critical hit. It is a damage 10 effect. Aquagirl checks this against either her Toughness or her Dodge, since both are 12, there's not much choice. She subtracts 12 from 10 giving her a total knockback effect of -2. A -2 on the Ranks and Measure chart is six feet. The blow sends Aquagirl stumbling back a few steps, but the sea princess quickly regains her balance and readies her next attack.

New Manuever: Push

You try to knock your opponent back.

Make an attack check against your opponent’s Parry with a –2 circumstance penalty on the check. If the attack succeeds, make an opposed check of your Strength or the pushing effect against your opponent’s Acrobatics or Athletics. Use whichever has the better bonus in each case.

If you win, the defender is pushed back. If you lose, the defender immediately gets another opposed check to try and push you. If it fails, the push attempt ends.

Light Punishment

The game will have a fairly strict 'no kill' rule. I'm not looking to run a game starring Punisher-like characters that shoot their enemies in the head at the end of each adventure. I'm a big fan of recurring villains and those types of vigilantes put a big damper on that.

Manuever Stacking

Manuever stacking is very powerful, so I'm using the same rule Law (another MnM GM on MW) uses.. You can stack an Advantage and a Manuever, but not an Advantage and an Advantage. For example you could Power Attack for +2 then All-Out Attack w/ the Advantage for +5, netting you +3 attack, +2 Effect, -5 defenses, but you could not Power Attack for +5 and All-Out Attack for +5 even if you had both advantages. This only applies to Manuevers that shift around character's attack, defense, and effect values such as Accurate Attack, All-Out Attack, Defensive Attack, and Power Attack. Manuevers like Team Attack are not effected by this rule.

Persuading

We will be using a different mechanical method of using the Persuasion skill with Deception's "Bluffing" as the base. When attempting to Persuade the hero will make an Opposed Check of their Persuasion against the target's Insight or Will. There are two factors that work against you: Your relationship with the target and the risk or reward presented to the target.

RESISTANCE CIRCUMSTANCE MODIFIER
The target is a close friend or ally. The reward is very beneficial. -5
The target is no one special to you. The reward is no real risk and doesn't offer any reward. 0
The target is someone you have had a negative relationship with. The risk is greater than reward. +5
The target is someone someone with whom you have a regularly antagonistic personal relationship. There is little or no reward for something that has high risk. +10
The target is someone who hates you with a passion and wants to do you personal harm. The offer is too outlandish to even consider. +20

Phase-Based Initiative

Combat rounds are broken into multiple phases of combat for both heroes and villains. During each phase, a small group of combatants from one side will take their turns simultaneously for that round of combat. A combat phase does not imply any specific amount of time in the game. It is considered to be less than a full round of combat, which is approximately six seconds, but the sum of all combat phases in a round would take occur during that same space of time.

The number of combat phases played during an encounter depends largely on the number of combatants involved in the battle and how the rolls come out. Typically it's at least two, but not more than five or six.

What Will the New Combat Round Look Like?

Each combat scenario will be different, and thus, not every combat round will look exactly the same as the rest. But the most common scenario will typically look like this:


Hero Phase 1

Villain Phase 1

Hero Phase 2

Villain Phase 2

Hero Phase 3


In a radically different scenario, like fighting against one really tough villain, for example, the combat phase might look something like this:


Hero Phase 1

Villain Phase 1

Hero Phase 2


Different scenarios will likely result in different configurations for combat phases as deemed appropriate by the GM, but should almost always be "Hero, Villain, Hero" or "Villain, Hero, Villain", it should never be "Hero, Hero, Villain" or something similar as back to back hero phases should be merged into one hero phase. The structure of the combat round will be determined at the start of every encounter so be sure to pay attention to the information that has been provided and check the Combat Reference Thread for any changes

Rolling for Initiative

Initiative rolls will be made by the GM for everyone at the start of the encounter. This will help speed things up tremendously instead of delaying play needlessly by waiting for everyone to roll their own initiatives. Once the rolls have been made, the GM will then determine the order and assign combat phases for both sides so that combat can begin right away.

Determining the Combat Order

After Initiative is rolled, Heroes and Villains will be placed in accordance with their rolls and with their side of combat. The heroes are grouped together based on similar initiatives and what they rolled in comparison to what the villains rolled.

For example, the heroes of Justice High (Outlaw, Wondergirl, Superman, Kid Devil, and Green Lantern) are facing off against the Choir of AngelZ (The Voice, Tenor, Bass, Soprano, and Alto). The GM Rolls initiative for both sides:


AngelZ

Tenor (27)

Alto (16)

Soprano (15)

Voice (14)

Bass (8)


Justice High

Kid Devil (21)

Outlaw (23)

Superman (16)

Wondergirl (13)

Green Lantern (12)


The Initiatives above are then ordered from highest to lowest:


Tenor (27)

Outlaw (23)

Kid Devil (21)

Superman (16)

Alto (16)

Soprano (15)

Voice (14)

Wondergirl (13)

Green Lantern (12)

Bass (8)


Then they are separated by each side of combat:


Phase 1

Tenor (27)


Phase 2

Outlaw (23)

Kid Devil (21)

Superman (16)


Phase 3

Alto (16)

Soprano (15)

Voice (14)


Phase 4

Wondergirl (13)

Green Lantern (12)


Phase 5

Bass (8)


That completes the ordering. Tenor is in a phase by himself, so is the only one to act during that time. Outlaw, Kid Devil, and Superman are in the second phase together. They can act in any order relative to one another. Superman, for example, does not have to wait until Outlaw and Kid Devil post their turns to post his own, he may post before them if able. Once all three have posted their actions, Alto, Soprano, and the Voice may post their turns (usually in order since they're NPCs and the GM controls all of them). After Alto, Soprano, and the Voice are finished, Wondergirl and Green Lantern then can post their turns in any order relative to one another and so on.

Posting

The main rule of how I would like to run this game is: Players show intent, DM shows results

This includes actions that require rolls and actions that do not. That being said, it's not to be taken to an extreme, if your character is going to take a drink, I don't need you to tell me you want to pick up the glass then wait for my response that you successfully lifted the glass from the table. I expect players to know when something requires the GM to determine the results and when something is minor enough to just write off in the narrative, I wouldn't choose you as a player if I didn't think you had that ability.

To conclude this, we'll just say that players will be determining the actions of their character and nothing more. They will interact with the world around them, but the GM will be the one determining the results of those interactions. I will add that I, as the GM, will not be acting for your characters without your consent or if there is some other unforseen reason (such as a player disappearing for a long period of time). In this game, you will have the freedom to do what you want, say what you wish and go where you desire, but always keep in mind every action has a consequence and that consequence is determined by the GM (that's part of the fun of being the GM)

Posting Format

A post will typically be divided into four sections: the Header, the Narrative, the Mechanics, and the Aside.

The Header

The Header is the first section of your post, this allows everyone to quickly see exactly who is posting. Generally the header conisists of the character portrait, the characters name, perhaps a couple lines about the character and maybe a small amount of mechanical informaiton about the character.

The Narrative

This is the first and the in character portion of the post. The start of this should always be a portrait of your character, this allows whoever reading your post to quickly recognize which character is posting. There is no hard rule on the length of your narrative. It shouldn't be extremely long, but at the same time, it should not be extremely short. Situations will often require different lengths of the post. Character dialogue should be bold and character thoughts should be in italics. Dialogue should remain black, as I find colored dialogue to just be distracting and not really add anything to the narrative. No dice rolls or other mechanics should be in this section (see below)

The Mechanics

Almost all conflicts in any roleplaying game this side of Freeform needs to have a mechanical resolution. This section should always be in a [spoiler="Mechanics"][/spoiler]. Each action should be separated by [fieldset="Action Type"][/fieldset] into it's different action. This is especially essential in combat, when there will be several actions done in one post. When using rolling dice, either the [ROLL] or [DICE] tags are acceptable, but please make certain that it is obvious what the roll is for by properly labeling it and making the results easily seen, if using the [ROLL] tag, you will need to put a "z" at the end of your string. For example, a character making an Athletics check with a +5 bonus could use [roll="Athletics Check"]1d20+5z[/roll] This allows me to quickly see the results and not worry about mousing over it to see the resulting number, since I'm often checking the board from my phone, this makes it much easier for me to see the results. Also, please include a description of the effect being used (rank, extras, flaws, etc) and state the target so that I can quickly see what happened rather have to go open separate windows or tabs to pull up the character and search for it or scroll through the narrative to find out a target.

In short, I should be able to look at the Mechanics section of your post and be able to see everything I need to resolve your turn. Your attack roll, your effect, and your target.

The Aside

This is the out of character portion of your post. it should be in a [fieldset="Player Box"][/fieldset], so it's easily distinguished. This will generally be a short note, as any lengthy out of character discussions should be reserved for the Lounge. A quick question to the DM is appropriate, perhaps a mechanical explaination of something in your narrative (For Example: if your character yelled "Move to the torch!", you could advise the other players in your Player Box of the specific map coordinates you'd like them to move to)

Reactionary Rolls

In an effort to keep things moving along at a steady pace, reactionary rolls will be done at the time most convenient, usually by the GM. This will mostly apply to Saves (usually Toughness). Players will roll their attacks normally, but the GM will make the toughness saves at the time the player is being told the if the Villain is hit. Since the GM has access to the player Saves, he will also roll those for the player at the time the Player is hit.

Players can still make the roll for their Hero when using Hero Points. For example, the GM hits the player and a poor Toughness save is rolled. The player reviews the post and opts to use a Hero Point to reroll the Toughness Check, he would roll it at the same time as he announced that he is using the Hero Point.

Reference Charts

Damage Resistance Matrix
Measurement Table, Measurement Ranks, Material Toughness, Making Checks, Size Rank Modifiers
Difficulty Class, Degrees of Success/Failure, Criticals, Defenses, Damage Resistance Checks, Range, Opposed Checks, Hero Points, Minions, Concealment & Cover
Actions/Manuevers, Basic Conditions, Extra Effort