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lm looking for a D&D for kids

   
lm looking for a D&D for kids

my nieces are looking to play a game of D&D but the oldest is 9.
so im looking for a kid friendly version.
amy suggestions?

If you're specifically looking for D&D, I'd probably pick up 5E. It's the most streamlined version of the ruleset I've yet seen, while still allowing for and rewarding crazy, off-the-wall strategies. At the same time it deliberately keeps the numbers lower, which can be a lot easier for younger kids to handle, math-wise.

Alternatively, go with Pathfinder, and have them all play kineticists of the various elements, for a Avatar / Legend of Korra feel. Pick burn-less abilities for them and voilà : few powers, all at-will, very little math to do and you can have them play very different characters by picking different elements.

If you want a DnD-like game aimed for kids, download Hero Kids. It's fantastic, it's mostly free and it'll lead kids to more complicated RPGs as they head towards their teenage years.

Make it up! I have played a couple sessions with my 9 and 7 year old. We started by deciding what type of character they wanted to play (fairy godmother, dashing warrior, dark sorceress, dwarf, these we mostly picked from books they had read) and then we thought about what we needed those characters to be able to do or what defined them (fly, hit enemies, cast spells, get around in caves). We used that discussion to create some attributes/abilities and how they worked. We went from there adding rules when we needed them. I downloaded a few one page RPGs to help guide our process but the kids feel like it is their game and they understand how it works. Kids mostly imagine freeform play, introducing a few rules to guide that seems to work well to encourage their creativity and still let them feel like they are playing a game. Using parts of a simple system like micro-lite 20 could help give it a D&D feel, but I recommend you not let things get too structured. The old school maxim of never telling players they can't do something, but giving the impossible really low chances, certainly applies. Kids will want to try everything and so they should.

I've been there. My kids were around the same age when I started running games. Instead of a new system, I ran a D&D 3.0 game in slightly "easy mode" for them. They insisted and even had fun. So here's how.

I made the bulk of their character sheets. The kids were present to answer some questions. Those sheets were made in "easy mode." There are default stat blocks in the book, which I tailored to the character concepts they gave me. "Knight" became a Fighter. "Bow and Arrow Guy" was a Ranger. Then I gave them generic skill spreads but asked if they thought the characters should be good at any particular skills. They plainly wanted to stab monsters. I chose feats that were easy on everyone and helped them stab monsters. (Improved initiative).

They had most of their fun in game with the help of a dry erase battle mat. This is the most important piece of advice I can offer: Fun, visual representation of what is going on. The cheap Chessex folding mat and about 12 different colored dry erase markers kept their attention. Being able to make or provide minis also helped - even if they were paper for a while.

Seriously, the battle mat was probably 2/3 of the success. They could "see" the scenes and see their own influence over events that way. I can't stress a battle mat enough.

The other thing about running D&D is that they actually got to play D&D. They knew about the game from the old cartoon. We watched the first movie together. They were happier playing actual D&D than the off brand.

Keeping their imaginations fired was the key. Quickly made character sheets and colorful visuals made it work.

Yeah, everyone is going to point to their favorite rule set (Hey, the 4E books are cheap right now! And Essentials books have the "no choices to make" system down pretty well).
But as AndrewJ said, just keeping them engaged in what is going on is the important part. Personally, I prefer wet-erase battle mats.
Also, there's the Heroclix Horrorclix game system. Horrorclix is great for monsters. You can probably find a nice lot or two on eBay for cheap.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WhisperMagellan View Post
Yeah, everyone is going to point to their favorite rule set (Hey, the 4E books are cheap right now! And Essentials books have the "no choices to make" system down pretty well).
But as AndrewJ said, just keeping them engaged in what is going on is the important part. Personally, I prefer wet-erase battle mats.
Also, there's the Heroclix Horrorclix game system. Horrorclix is great for monsters. You can probably find a nice lot or two on eBay for cheap.
Hey if I was plugging my favorite system I'd be saying "all kids want to be superheroes, get them playing Masks."

another system that is somewhat rules light and needs more love would be "Monsters and other childish things".

The D&D boxed sets are great for young beginners as an introduction, I played with mine back in the day (probably 3.5e), they genuinely enjoyed it, after they are designed to get you hooked.




 

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