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lm looking for a D&D for kids

   
One nice system for quick & dirty, easy rules is West End Games D6, which is probably best known for Star Wars, but does have rules for SciFi, Super Heroes (DC), Western, Fantasy, and more.
Also, a lot of the books are available cheep as used books.

My kids are 6 & 9 and we started them on No Thank You, Evil! by Monte Cooke. It's based on the Cypher system and I find that super easy for them to learn the math of it. The complexity of the game/character creation is expandable based on player skill level, so it has some growth to it. Mostly, my kids just love the story telling aspect of the game. The mechanics are just there to drive the story - so we don't get hung up on the details.

If you're looking for something a little darker, I enjoyed Little Fears. The original is better (IMO) than the 2nd ed. version but I believe the basics can be found online. It's not a game I'd play with my kids yet as it tends to the more nightmare/scary side of things. But, if your nieces are open to scary/horror themes (and you have permission from their parents), this is more gritty than No Thank You, Evil.

Finding a way to craft adventures and play RPGs like D&D without getting into the adult themes can be hard. You have to be in the right mindset to make a family-friendly yet very enjoyable game. My advice would be to see if you can use the suggestions of the others as practice, and then move over to D&D when you have some ideas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rune Knight View Post
Finding a way to craft adventures and play RPGs like D&D without getting into the adult themes can be hard. You have to be in the right mindset to make a family-friendly yet very enjoyable game. My advice would be to see if you can use the suggestions of the others as practice, and then move over to D&D when you have some ideas.
The thing about family friendly is that it it's not about what's happening but how it is presented.
Basically, what takes violence and such things from the realm of fun and games and into the realm of horror is examination. Tom and Jerry cartoons are harmless and fun to watch even if they are full of horrible violence. But if they at any point took a serious turn and presented the viewer with the obvious consequence of bowling balls falling on top of a cats head they would quickly make children cry.

So like just have them slay monsters that are obviously evil stupid monsters that only exist to be evil stupid monsters and don't delve into trying to make them people and you should be fine.

Another alternative to consider for youngsters:

The Beginner Games for Star Wars Edge of the Empire or Age of Rebellion are excellent introductions for either role-playing system, especially suitable for young fans. At only $30, each set comes with a complete set of dice, a simplified Rulebook based on the full game, and an introductory adventure complete with pregen character folios that teaches the basics of the rules and role-playing in a natural and gradual progression as you play. There's also maps and tokens, and an expanded adventure you can download from the website for free. The system is easy to learn, and the boxed sets have more than enough information to continue playing for many sessions even if you have no interest in going further with the full game.

Almost forgot, there are similar boxed sets for Force and Destiny (Jedi) and the Force Awakens (if they're into the new trilogy). Edge is generally about smugglers and bounty hunters, while Age is geared towards the Rebellion itself. Good luck!

Hey, if you want to go star wars, the most friendly system has to be the West End Games D6 system.
And they are pretty cheap on Amazon. Heck, I think most of it is even free online now.

@WhisperMagellan That is an opinion, and this is not a debate or a competition. Good options are good options, and good options for kids are harder to come by so the more the merrier. And there is more than one Star Wars game out there. WEG may be a little harder to grasp for some younger people, in which case the narrative mechanics and dice symbols might be easier to grasp. Either way, I don't recall seeing a WEG starter set for beginners which is what I am specifically prescribing here. They are well written and very teachable, even for younger audiences.

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Originally Posted by PPQ_Purple View Post
So like just have them slay monsters that are obviously evil stupid monsters that only exist to be evil stupid monsters and don't delve into trying to make them people and you should be fine.
I agree with this. At level one, you can find a lot of adversaries that can be described like 8 bit video game villains. Spooky skeletons. Giant rats. Going up a few levels, you get fish people and whatnot. If druids can turn into dinosaurs than players can eventually hunt dinosaurs. Heck - run an entire dinosaur campaign! Now I want to play that, too.

The point is: There is plenty in D&D that never has to be horrific or grimdark. There's plenty of overlap between what's fun for young players and what's in the Monster Manuals.

And as always - run D&D if the player wants D&D!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacob Lewis View Post
@WhisperMagellan That is an opinion, and this is not a debate or a competition. Good options are good options, and good options for kids are harder to come by so the more the merrier. And there is more than one Star Wars game out there. WEG may be a little harder to grasp for some younger people, in which case the narrative mechanics and dice symbols might be easier to grasp. Either way, I don't recall seeing a WEG starter set for beginners which is what I am specifically prescribing here. They are well written and very teachable, even for younger audiences.
How is it harder? Only have 6-sided dice. Whoever rolls higher wins. The more you do at once, the fewer dice you have because your focus is split. There isn't a starter set because honestly the system is simple. It goes almost entirely to story, with almost no "min-maxing" or "char-opping" (sure, there's some, but no where near the complexities of any edition of D&D).
You can learn WEG d6 in 5 minutes and master it within an hour.




 

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