On the difference between creativity and "special snowflakes" - Page 3 - Myth-Weavers


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On the difference between creativity and "special snowflakes"

 
So, I have to know @Catherine Cook what did the potential player say in return?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOasysMaster View Post
So, I have to know @Catherine Cook what did the potential player say in return?
I'd rather not answer this question. Their original message and my answer were nothing more than the perfect example I needed in order to get this topic started... But the conversation that took place beyond that was in private, and should remain private. If I were to publicly reveal the kind of positions they chose to stand by in the face of what I said, it would sound like I was either mocking them or trying to paint them in a negative light so as to validate my own points: neither of these is the goal of this topic.

Really, there's very little difference between an excellent, creative and unique character and a "Mary Sue" special snowflake other than tone and implementation. They're very different but they're also two sides of the same coin, and you don't need to shift your perspective much to see a lot of them as the other thing.

To be honest, you haven't really told us enough about the pitch for us to judge it; it's perfectly possible that, actually, it made a lot of sense. Is this player trying to play an angel-themed character despite the fact that that's not a relevant option for the game? Are they trying to play such a character because it's not a relevant option for the game, and they're just contrary? Or are they actually trying to tie their character to the setting in a really interesting way? So angels are these weird dudes with a very special place in the setting - great! Perhaps their character has devoted their whole life to understanding them, and philosophises constantly on their nature? Perhaps they're obsessed, and try to link every adventure to those mystical super-beings they seek so much to emulate? The Aasimar thing is pretty easy to fluff one of a myriad ways, given a sufficiently magical setting.

Chances are, it was more the former than the latter - but it's all about context and presentation. Hell, I've applied to games before with characters who broke the rules and got accepted anyway*. I figure if you can get accepted despite breaking the rules, you've done a decent job.

I guess none of this conflicts with what you're actually saying, which is basically, "write good characters"? That seems like pretty sound advice to me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catherine Cook View Post
Why doesn't this website have a "like post" option ;-;
Erm... because it's not a bad website?

*In fairness, there's one I'm thinking of specifically where the "no monsters" rule was stated explicitly only after I'd written up Cthulhu's younger brother.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Catherine Cook View Post
neither of these is the goal of this topic.
Fair enough.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFred View Post
To be honest, you haven't really told us enough about the pitch for us to judge it
Except I did. My game is set on Ravnica, a plane of the popular MtG card game, which recently got a (very good) crossover book with 5e. As per a long-standing MtG tradition, angels over there are all female, and... How can I put it? As beings of pure mana, they're not properly equipped for the task of carrying a new life within their bellies for nine months. Please don't make me go into cruder details than this.

Player guide to not pissing off a GM:
1. Read the advert
2. Read the advert
3. Read the advert
4. Do you know enough about the setting (at least read a fiction book or a sourcebook)?
5. Read the advert
6. Ask the GM "does this work in your world/setting?"
7. Read the advert
8. Write a PC

Quote:
Originally Posted by Catherine Cook View Post
Except I did. My game is set on Ravnica, a plane of the popular MtG card game, which recently got a (very good) crossover book with 5e. As per a long-standing MtG tradition, angels over there are all female, and... How can I put it? As beings of pure mana, they're not properly equipped for the task of carrying a new life within their bellies for nine months. Please don't make me go into cruder details than this.
So? This is a world of magic. An Aasimar in this world doesn't literally have to be the child of an angel - there are umpteen ways you could play that. It's all about what you're willing to go with. There's an argument, of course, that says, well, if it's just fluff, why do you need to be an Aasimar at all? Be a human, and maybe you still got some shred of angelic power somehow but perhaps that manifests as "being a Cleric" or something. Point is, that in itself isn't a barrier if you can persuade the DM that the story is good enough that it warrants it.

In fact, you even said in your description of the pitch that it included an alternative way of having become an Aasimar. Now, I can see that you might not want to allow that, fine; however I can also imagine ways of spinning that which would work totally fine and come across no more "special snowflake" than pretty much any character from any ensemble cast story. Like I said, it's all about context and presentation. Even then, it might not be right for that game, but it can sure as hell make a hell of a difference.

@Southernskies I think reading the advert should be added to your list. Along with a healthy amount of DM/GM interaction.

Another Example:
Game Master: Alrighty, guys. We are going to play a game of Star Wars: Saga Edition, which'll surround exploring the nature of the force; the Light and the Dark Side, the places in between and without....
Player: I made a Mandalorian battledroid bounty hunter! Is this game going to take us to the Outer Rim?
Game Master: I've got a baaaaad feeling about this.

In regards to snowflakes vs not snowflakes:
It's all perspective. One group of players might be fine ripping off ideas from established sources and even have fun role-playing such despite the obvious lack of actual "uniqueness" in their characters. Another group might dive deeply into creating their characters and put a lot of thought and genuine attention to detail into the role play. Neither of these are the "wrong" way to role play. Role playing is about having fun at its core, not about being "original".

In regards to the OP's reply to said player:
Instead of a long winded thoughtful explanation of my thoughts on this I'll just say:
"You could have just said no and left it at that."







 

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