Can someone explain the attraction of LitRpg novels to me? - Page 3 - Myth-Weavers

Notices


General Discussion

All-purpose section for discussions that donít clearly belong in any of the other categories.


Can someone explain the attraction of LitRpg novels to me?

   
Twain? It would only take minor changes for Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court to become a litRPG novel. All the core elements would stay the same.

Good point! I haven't read Connecticut Yankee in well over a decade, but as far as the whole story-within-a-story thing goes, you hit the nail on the head, Ben.

I hadn't heard the term LitRPG before, either, but recently I ended up reading one by mistake. It was "Grimgar of Fantasy and Ash", and the splash pages before page one had pictures and short descriptions of each character. It struck me as a lazy, unprofessional way to introduce characters, and even worse it included each character's "class". I stuck with the novel itself for maybe 50 pages, but it droned on without sufficient tension or writing, and I gave up. Maybe the splash pages had biased me too much against it, maybe not.

I don't expect every book I read to be high literature. I also read genre fiction, manga, and light novels. But if this is a good example of LitRPG, I want nothing more to do with it.

Grimgar has an anime adaptation is that is largely considered good but not great.

...I'm starting to think that all of the possible weaknesses of a LitRPG Novel are at least partially alleviated by adapting it to a different media. Even Scott Pilgrim, which only uses game references like that for gags, still has the advantage of showing the gag in both its original comic and adapted movie versions.

It reminds me of one of the major pieces of advice I sometimes hear for new players of D&D:
Describe your character without using their literal Class or other mechanical statistics.

A LitRPG's whole point is kinda directly counter to that and the notion of "show, don't tell".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Veradux View Post
It reminds me of one of the major pieces of advice I sometimes hear for new players of D&D:
Describe your character without using their literal Class or other mechanical statistics.

A LitRPG's whole point is kinda directly counter to that and the notion of "show, don't tell".
I agree that LitRPG breaks a lot of those rules. One thing I like about the genre is how it's different than other stories. Two people can be engaged in a fight to kill a dragon and save a city but the characters and readers know it's just a game so the actual tension in the scene (if it's a good story that has some) isn't whether he goes back the respawn point but has to be something character driven.

I'd say 80% of the genre is trash but the good stuff is unique to other stories. Not better, just different. If you're looking to read and like a chance of pace it can be fun.

I haven't read a LitRPG book. But I've enjoyed being a Reader in Games on this site at times. Seems similar. And at times see an Ad (with applications) for a solo / one player adventure. Being a Reader of a Game like that seems like a LitRPG in a way. Or a reader of someone else reading a choose your own adventure book. I appreciate the information / conversation. Good points made all around. Like - "Describe your character without using their literal Class or other mechanical statistics." Etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raveled View Post
In SAO the characters exist in an MMO, right? Like, not just in the fictional setting of Warcraft but actually in the video game World of Warcraft. So to me it makes sense that they hit a goblin and 140 in red numbers pops up over the creature's head.
Quote:
Originally Posted by leons1701 View Post
My understanding of LitRPG is that that is pretty much the definition. Every article I can find seems to pretty much agree that the entire point is that these really are characters in an MMO. In some cases, there may be sequences set outside the MMO in the real world (or even in other MMO's), but the idea that this is the story of someone playing a game is key.
How is this any different from a classic "low fantasy" or even just a regular sci-fi or very boring drama, depending on the situation?

If the story is that the characters just play some MMOs for a while, then that's just a story about some people playing some MMOs. I guess that could be its own genre because nobody has come up with anything that ridiculous since A Question of Sport thought that watching other people answering questions about yet other people playing games would be anything other than absolutely atrocious... to be honest I don't really know.

If it's characters getting "sucked in" to an MMO then it's low fantasy (the characters are originally from our world but most events take place in a fantastical fictional world) or if they're trapped inside a virtual reality type thing then it's more likely to be termed sci-fi though it's functionally the same. Neither are exactly novel (no pun intended).

It sounds from the rather poorly-written Wikipedia entry at least that it's the former, in which case... yeah. Is there an attraction? I guess it's not much different from dramas about people playing sport or whatever, but they're usually only any good if there's something more interesting than the sport itself happening.

I believe the distinction is in that they are explicitly using game terminology for everyday speech while existing in a fantasy world, not that they're in an MMO or such. That the people in the world are using familiar gaming terminology to explain away how their world functions. How they end up doing that is largely irrelevant, regardless whether it's someone playing the game, forcibly trapped, or something else.

It's just that isekai is a very prominent example as it has been stupidly prominent in light novels, manga, and anime after Sword Art's rise to popularity. Like, I can name a grand total of two from those mediums in recent memory to be both fantasy and not isekai.

Keep in mind that there's a reason that isekai and its sub-types are so popular. Not only are they perfect 'wish fulfillment' vehicles since their protagonists are generally from the same sub-group as their readers, they are also provide the author with an extremely easy to to introduce anything they want to the story information wise since it can always be explained as either
a) an 'in the know' character or native of the fictional world having to explain to the newcomer who knows literally nothing
b) the 'game' introducing a new mechanic, which in turn gives the author the opportunity to 'explain' the old mechanic as well

Can we really say they're "so popular" though? I mean, when the average reader has never even heard of the genre, never mind any of its authors or titles, I'm not sure we can say they're "so popular" with anything resembling a straight face.







 

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Last Database Backup 2018-08-18 09:00:12am local time
Myth-Weavers Status