Quickie race listing for Aelsif - Myth-Weavers

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Quickie race listing for Aelsif

   
Quickie race listing for Aelsif

Here's a list of the player races in Aelsif's core rulebook, which focuses on one continent and the islands between it and the other continents. My main concern is that they aren't sufficiently diverse or interesting at this time, and if I need to bring in the races from the other continents as well to round out the roster. You be the judge, and let me know if this is good enough for a core rulebook or we need the other continents too.

Humans:
Physical traits: Large and imposing, physically strong and durable, able to function while fatally wounded.
Cultural traits: Supportive, kind-hearted generous, loyal and helpful, but only to their family and close friends. Stubborn, tribalistic, pious and dogmatic. Only decent to their ingroup and quick to reject members, judgemental, self-righteous, hateful, vicious and bigoted. (Bigot, noun, person who is obstinately or intolerantly devoted to his or her own opinions and prejudices especially one who regards or treats the members of a group with hatred and intolerance.)
Pros: Extremely high base stats, last stand ability allows them to remain conscious while at or below 0hp temporarily.
Cons: Few special abilities or defences. Just last stand, a good number of perks, and some DR against bludgeon damage.

Children of Heaven: (Human variant race)
Physical traits: Eternal children, immortal, fire elemental, able to function while fatally wounded.
Cultural traits: Much like humans, except far more courageous and self-sacrificing, but also haughty and dispassionate due to their "divine" status and tiny population of 144,000 compared over a billion humans.
Pros: Regenerates, fire resistance, breathes fire, functions while severely damaged, heart can regenerate entire body.
Cons: Cold vulnerability, weaker than humans (even children their own size), destroying the heart can easily kill them.

Green Ash Goblin: (Goblin variant race)
Physical traits: Small, resilient, unusually hard to kill for something so small, except using direct physical attacks.
Cultural traits: Skeptical, insular, forms small tight-knit communities (stationary settlements and nomadic caravans) that are suspicious of outsiders and hard to earn the trust of, but treating their entire community like a family, lending helping hands and emotional support.
Pros: Exceptional special defences, especially against poison. Decent natural armour and mild energy resistance.
Cons: Weak, low faith stat, vulnerable on the physical side, defenceless against bullets and other anti-armour attacks.

Jungle Goblins: (Goblin variant race)
Physical traits: Similar to green ash goblins, but slightly smaller and lankier.
Cultural traits: Cynical, reclusive, forms ironclad family groups that only trade members for reproductive purposes.
Pros: Exceptional special defences, especially against disease. Sneaky little buggers with the highest in-game perception.
Cons: Weak, low faith stat, low charisma, not as tough as green ash goblins and are just as incapable of taking a bullet.

Hobgoblins:
Physical traits: Almost as big as humans, though a bit shorter, covered in thick hide that trounces claws and teeth.
Cultural traits: Tribalistic, cheery, idealistic, naive, violent and primitive. Wages wars of sport to claim tribute, does not understand total war and can only call other cultures evil for engaging in it.
Pros: Tanks start to finish, high defences and even a resistance to falling damage and good resting recovery outdoors.
Cons: Poor offence, defences optimized for natural weapons and not high damage anti-armour attacks like musket balls.

Children of the Sky: (Hobgoblin variant race)
Physical traits: Eternal children, immortal, sky elemental, levitates.
Cultural traits: Reserved, patient, courageous, self-sacrificing, idealistic, charming and charismatic. Their people's champions in war, able to call down lightning from the sky.
Pros: Same kill conditions as Children of Heaven, tanky with electric resistance, limited levitation and lightning.
Cons: Not as tanky as other hobbos, especially lower HP, so one gunshot and a bayonet through their heart is enough.

Dagonites:
Physical traits: Amphibians with features of sharks and frogs, adapted for great undersea pressure.
Cultural traits: Simple, reclusive, secretive, knowledgeable but unwilling to share. Mournful of the loss of the great Thetean civilization on the ocean floor, but unwilling to resurrect it. Live and serve now to isolate the south from northerners.
Pros: Best race in the water, bodies able to withstand concussion and cold, strong and deadly.
Cons: Slow on land and becomes ill if on land for too long, poor dexterity and vulnerability to fire and electricity.

Children of the Outer Sea: (Dagonite race variant.)
Physical traits: Eternal children, you get how this works and I respect your intelligence. Water elemental.
Cultural traits: The most dedicated of all to the quarantine of the southern continent (actually an ice sheet over an archipelago) of all dagonites. They live, breathe, sweat and bleed duty.
Pros: Immortality like the Children of Heaven and Children of the Sky and cold powers.
Cons: Not as fast in the water or as strong as other dagonites.

Pastoral Halflings: (Halfling variant race)
Physical traits: Small, fat and durable. Incredible stamina for little fat people.
Cultural traits: Reserved, peaceful, complacent, ignorant, isolated and unable to realise the machinations the world has for them.
Pros: Basically small humans. Want better dexterity and perception, without being harder to play? Good choice here.
Cons: Less strength than humans, overall the same base stats, not as offensively powerful.

Pygmy Halflings: (Halfling variant race)
Physical traits: Small, lanky and sneaky. Very fast for their short little legs, too.
Cultural traits: Timid, reserved, careful and calculating. Submissive and prone to deception, terrified of direct confrontation.
Pros: Skinny, stealthy version of halflings. Better skill bonuses, especially stealth, and high movement speed.
Cons: Lower base stats than halflings, lacks the endurance of their fatter southern counterparts.

Children of the Firmament: (Halfling variant race)
Physical traits: Eternal children, but even smaller. You get it. Wind elemental.
Cultural traits: Arbiters of halfling law. They calmly resolve disputes, preserving the peace within the island city-states.
Pros: Regeneration, immortality and a voice that can shake a palace, all packed into a tiny package.
Cons: Very fragile for an immortal, one good hit to the heart and they're screwed. Also very weak.

Drakelings:
Physical traits: Small dragon-men with four arms who breathe fire, though their fire is rather pathetic.
Cultural traits: Broken as a people. Submissive and subservient, left to flee or to submit, or else to die fighting.
Pros: Decent natural armour and fire resistant, also a firebreathing dragon. They also keep getting bigger as they age.
Cons: Weak, fragile, easily punctured or bludgeoned and their fire is too weak to stop a human from punching their clock. They also can't speak mammalian languages, and this language barrier is problematic when they live as an underclass in mammalian territory.

Flying Drakelings: (Drakeling variant race)
Physical traits: Drakelings with wings in place of their upper arms. Infertile hybrids born of drakeling females and pygmy wyrms. (Which are non-sapient animals.)
Cultural traits: Proud and stubborn, willing to fight to the last and unwilling to admit defeat. Still, melancholy before the fall of their people, who they once ruled.
Pros: Very limited flight, better fire breath and tremendous faith compared to other drakelings.
Cons: Even more fragile than other drakelings, and with only two working arms since they have a wyrm's wings.

Okay. Put the diversity question aside. Do you think the four "children of" races will see much play? Are they appealing, conceptually? They're one of the weirder things I've posted, and probably the strangest player races so far. (Though there's weirder ones on the other continents.)

To elaborate:
These four are unusual from a gameplay perspective because of their use of alternate kill conditions. I don't think I've ever seen another game give alternate kill conditions to a player race. The regeneration is part of that, and to compensate they take constitution damage from critical hits. The way their age is handled is also unusual, as they can be one of four ages, but they will be that age forever, and the younger their age the lower overall their base stats become but the stronger their supernatural powers become, such as the children of heaven's fire resistance and fire breath.

They're also unusual from a lore perspective.
1. All four are rare, Children of Heaven having the fewest at 144,000 and Children of the Outer Seas being the most numerous at 1,728,000, but they're constantly maintained and every time one dies another is born within a year.
2. They're all seen as divine and taken as confirmation of their people's religion, despite all four coming from different religions which should throw that out the window right away.
3. They're natural born theurges, they can hear the voice of their god and communicate with it. Which is extra bizarre given the above. Nobody seems to question what they're actually talking to, either, especially not them.

Then there's the big question of where they come from.
1. Obviously, ageless children can't reproduce, but they keep being born from normal people. It being spontaneous or by divine conception may be a satisfying answer for some, but we're better than that here, aren't we?
2. Three of the cultures that have them tribute young girls to their religious institutions, who end up giving birth to these immortal children. Their compliance isn't a factor. This seems pretty clear on how they're produced, except...
3. ...The fourth does not, and sees such a thing as barbaric, backwards heathen savagery, but it still produces its own immortal children (children of heaven) somehow, and claims these are virgin births.
4. Deepening this mystery, two of the religions teach that their god physically exist in their temples (in one case, a single great temple and in the other, it roams between temples) and directly impregnate girls with these children, but the others don't teach that their god is physically available where these girls are impregnated, and are in inaccessible or extra-universal locations.

And as for the belief they're divine:
1. Children of the Sky have some extra credence lended to their divine origin by the temple being located in a floating city above an active volcano, which is transparently impossible but nevertheless is a thing. As the buildings of the city all orbit below the central temple, with some moving between them like great stone gondolas to allow the city's people to pass between the buildings. That seems to point even more to the idea that there's something in that temple that's making an entire city defy gravity. Whether that something is the hobgoblin sky god, as they claim, remains to be seen as outsiders have never been allowed entry and it's awfully hard to force entry into a flying city, since the inhabitants seem to be able to simply stop the gondolas.

2. The Children of the Outer Sea have some evidence too, because of an incident of one of them being abducted shortly following their birth, and the sailors claim their ship was assaulted by a great beast from the deep with a finned head and a human face with giant unblinking eyes, an obese body with eyes running down it, a sack made of ice dragging behind it, six tentacles, four clawed limbs and two double-elbowed arms, which the sailors insisted was the dagonite god. The crew was traumatised, the first mate led a mutiny after the encounter, killed the captain, and ran the ship aground to escape the ocean faster.

3. Circumstancial evidence exists for the Children of Heaven, namely that they are a recent thing, only having come to be following the travel of the Prophetic sect's pontiff (he wasn't that at the time, he was just an influential reformist preacher) to the White Unknown of the southern ice sheet, in an effort to find the resting place of the dead Aeldyan deity Aeldyshana, as at the time he taught that the Aeldyan deities were actually misinterpreted archangels. He returned an entirely different person, subjugated his own sect by killing half its members for "sins" he'd previously championed as rights, and led an army to take what is the Holy Empire today, and dropped his previous teachings entirely for the most extreme fundamentalist interpretation of the monotheist religion to date. Shortly afterwards, the first children of heaven were born in his church. They've spread from there, but they did only start after the Prophet's unspeakable encounter and specifically in his church, his exact temple in his new capital.

4. Finally, no real evidence exists for the Children of the Firmament. They claim they originate from pilgrims to the Tomb of the Mother on Sohei, but that location is in the middle of the Otherlands, and should be unreachable since the otherlands are a cursed region of otherworldly beasts, twisted alien landscapes, supernatural weather and unholy presence that eats away at the minds of those who venture too deep into it. Especially by sea, where the Tomb may or may not actually exist along a tall peninsular bluff, it should be unreachable. But if there's anything that explains the bizzarre traits, and particularly the earthshaking voice, of these children, it'd be originating in a blasted glassen hellscape where the wind has faces and the sky screams at you. But then, the existence of such a place is already a problem, and so is the fact that it's growing larger as time goes on, so maybe that's the fear talking.

5. None of these really prove anything, of course. But they're all hard to ignore.

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Originally Posted by Avianmosquito View Post
Okay. Put the diversity question aside. Do you think the four "children of" races will see much play? Are they appealing, conceptually? They're one of the weirder things I've posted, and probably the strangest player races so far. (Though there's weirder ones on the other continents.)

To elaborate:
These four are unusual from a gameplay perspective because of their use of alternate kill conditions. I don't think I've ever seen another game give alternate kill conditions to a player race. The regeneration is part of that, and to compensate they take constitution damage from critical hits.
I don't have an opinion on the rest of it*, but I'd like to note that a bayonet through the heart kills anyone, three-hearted dragons
depends on whether they need all three hearts to live
possibly excluded. Maybe it would be better to have another kind of attack, which is still reasonably common, like fire, but not as likely to happen "accidentally", as in, resulting from the usual "I kill you a lot" tactics?

*Other than "why not, it seems fun and you should totally go for it".

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Originally Posted by AsenRG View Post
I don't have an opinion on the rest of it*, but I'd like to note that a bayonet through the heart kills anyone, three-hearted dragons
depends on whether they need all three hearts to live
possibly excluded. Maybe it would be better to have another kind of attack, which is still reasonably common, like fire, but not as likely to happen "accidentally", as in, resulting from the usual "I kill you a lot" tactics?

*Other than "why not, it seems fun and you should totally go for it".
How would it work for an element? That damage type not regenerating? Dealing CON damage? Instant death if they take a set amount of it? If they take it while at a certain negative?

What does a party with no ability to do that damage type, or very limited ability, do? It's not a defence you could work around another way, or just overpower. And if the amount needed is low enough any party could reasonably do it, then any party whose caster has spells of that element attuned will instakill them.

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Originally Posted by Avianmosquito View Post
How would it work for an element? That damage type not regenerating? Dealing CON damage? Instant death if they take a set amount of it? If they take it while at a certain negative?
Ahem...yes?
It's your game, you pick one of these. Me, I'd pick "being dropped by a blow with that descriptor, or being dealt a finishing blow (not Coup de Grace) with it".

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What does a party with no ability to do that damage type, or very limited ability, do?
That's why I said "common enough". If you want, even in your variant a party of old-school clerics, sorcerers and monks might not have any ability to deal piercing damage to a heart. Rare? Yes. Might happen? Also yes. What do they do? Improvisation is as old as the first RPG, and arguably is what drew people to this kind of games in the first place.

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It's not a defence you could work around another way, or just overpower. And if the amount needed is low enough any party could reasonably do it, then any party whose caster has spells of that element attuned will instakill them.
And if they have low enough constitution, they should really, really be afraid of Keen Rapiers? (Or whatever those were named, the ones that improve your critical odds).

Again, it's your game. The above is how I'd do it. I'm sure you can do it differently and still make it fun...but being able to see how others would approach the same issue is part of the advantage of being on a discussion forum, right?

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Originally Posted by AsenRG View Post
Ahem...yes?
It's your game, you pick one of these. Me, I'd pick "being dropped by a blow with that descriptor, or being dealt a finishing blow (not Coup de Grace) with it".
And if the blow that did so is 1 damage?

Also, the way crits work means we don't need a coup de grace rule. You crit at AC+X.

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That's why I said "common enough". If you want, even in your variant a party of old-school clerics, sorcerers and monks might not have any ability to deal piercing damage to a heart. Rare? Yes. Might happen? Also yes. What do they do? Improvisation is as old as the first RPG, and arguably is what drew people to this kind of games in the first place.
They'd use other, less efficient criticals to get it done. It'd be harder, but still possible. And I can't pick one damage type here, each of the "child of" races has a different element. Normally, you'd defeat regen with fire, but what about children of heaven? Their element is fire, they resist fire, and they breathe fire.

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And if they have low enough constitution, they should really, really be afraid of Keen Rapiers? (Or whatever those were named, the ones that improve your critical odds).
That was the name in D&D, but there's no keen enchantment in this game. Rapiers do still have great critical threshold, though, a thrust gets a crit at AC+15 for 3x damage, a cut at AC+5 for 2x damage. But rolling AC+15 is still hard, (just not as hard as most thrusts' +20 or +25), so you will still need to compromise an enemy's defences most of the time.

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Again, it's your game. The above is how I'd do it. I'm sure you can do it differently and still make it fun...
I do use elements to defeat regen for a lot of monsters, I know it works and I do it in some ways I think are interesting, I just don't think it works as well for PCs.

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but being able to see how others would approach the same issue is part of the advantage of being on a discussion forum, right?
It's also part of the fun of being on a discussion forum. Hearing other people's ideas, playing with them, seeing how they'd work. It's pretty enjoyable.

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Originally Posted by Avianmosquito View Post
And if the blow that did so is 1 damage?
Given how abstract hit points are? Doesn't matter.

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Also, the way crits work means we don't need a coup de grace rule. You crit at AC+X.
Which should be all the time once you've dropped someone down?

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They'd use other, less efficient criticals to get it done. It'd be harder, but still possible. And I can't pick one damage type here, each of the "child of" races has a different element. Normally, you'd defeat regen with fire, but what about children of heaven? Their element is fire, they resist fire, and they breathe fire.
Why should they have the same weakness? Make the Heavenly ones susceptible to, say, strangulation. Fire dies without oxygen...but strangulation isn't a priority while someone is swinging a blade back at you. So you drop them, then strangle them before they can regenerate.

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That was the name in D&D, but there's no keen enchantment in this game. Rapiers do still have great critical threshold, though, a thrust gets a crit at AC+15 for 3x damage, a cut at AC+5 for 2x damage. But rolling AC+15 is still hard, (just not as hard as most thrusts' +20 or +25), so you will still need to compromise an enemy's defences most of the time.
Cutting with a rapier makes it easier to score a critical? Is that a typo?

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I do use elements to defeat regen for a lot of monsters, I know it works and I do it in some ways I think are interesting, I just don't think it works as well for PCs.
What's the difference? NPCs are allowed to play smart, too!

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It's also part of the fun of being on a discussion forum. Hearing other people's ideas, playing with them, seeing how they'd work. It's pretty enjoyable.
Indeed.

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Originally Posted by AsenRG View Post
Given how abstract hit points are? Doesn't matter.
That's not true in all systems.

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Which should be all the time once you've dropped someone down?
Not all the time, but it is a lot easier, and anyway that's the point. You need to deliver a good finishing blow, usually a thrust, once they're down. That can be awfully hard sometimes.

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Why should they have the same weakness? Make the Heavenly ones susceptible to, say, strangulation. Fire dies without oxygen...but strangulation isn't a priority while someone is swinging a blade back at you. So you drop them, then strangle them before they can regenerate.
Depends on the fire. But as much as mandatory strangulation might be viable, wouldn't PC children of heaven be effectively immortal unless the party wipes, because nobody could strangle them with their party there? (And wouldn't air get through the holes you put in them anyway?)

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Cutting with a rapier makes it easier to score a critical? Is that a typo?
No, cuts always crit easier, but for a lower multiplier. Rapiers are still thrust centric, that's just handled through damage dice.

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What's the difference? NPCs are allowed to play smart, too!
But do they, usually? And what if the player decides "Well, only fire can kill me. I'm going to pick all the fire resist gear and have fire resist 9,355." (Hyperbole, obviously.)

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Indeed.
Yes. Let us continue.

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Originally Posted by Avianmosquito View Post
That's not true in all systems.
Do PCs gain potentially as much HP as they had already when they go from 1st to 2nd level, or a comparable amount (say a hard 60% of it)? If yes, then it's abstract.
The Vitality-and-Wounds optional rule exists for a reason, too. But your system isn't applying that one, AFAICT.

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Not all the time, but it is a lot easier, and anyway that's the point. You need to deliver a good finishing blow, usually a thrust, once they're down. That can be awfully hard sometimes.
Depending on what you need to do for a finisher, remember.
But then, logically, a rapier isn't going to puncture plate armour's breastplate, pretty much ever. So does wearing plate armour make you immune to rapier trusts puncturing the heart? No? Then I'd say you need not make them sweat it too much if they're weaponizing a silver piece to improvise a silver weapon to deliver that same final blow (assuming they need to deliver it with silver, just as an example).

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Depends on the fire. But as much as mandatory strangulation might be viable, wouldn't PC children of heaven be effectively immortal unless the party wipes, because nobody could strangle them with their party there?
No? Depends on how long you need to deprive them of air.
But then we're getting into the "should enemies finish off a downed (regenerating) PC" debate, which I've got no interest in.

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(And wouldn't air get through the holes you put in them anyway?)
What, in their bloodstream? That's a much, much worse injury, almost untreatable and almost always lethal, AFAIK. So let the Children hope the answer is "no", because it's not the enemy's problem if that happens.


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No, cuts always crit easier, but for a lower multiplier. Rapiers are still thrust centric, that's just handled through damage dice.
...I guess, if you're measuring the likelihood of dying (not of being unable to fight), that might make sense. But overall, it's the opposite of how I would expect weapons to work. (Stabbing kills with far less effort, if you hit a vital organ, but have an easier time bypassing most armours. Slashing disables much faster, is more likely to kill you by bloodloss, but most armours protect better against it. Assuming PCs would wear some kind of armour, that's not a simulation I'd be happy with).

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But do they, usually? And what if the player decides "Well, only fire can kill me. I'm going to pick all the fire resist gear and have fire resist 9,355." (Hyperbole, obviously.)
See breastplate, above.
Also, I'd expect a smart player to invest in gear that covers his weakness if any is available. Not that there's a market for magic items in the settings I run, but if there was, that would be the smart choice, obviously...so why would I discourage it?

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Yes. Let us continue.
Maybe, but that's my last post for today!

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Originally Posted by AsenRG View Post
Do PCs gain potentially as much HP as they had already when they go from 1st to 2nd level, or a comparable amount (say a hard 60% of it)? If yes, then it's abstract.
The Vitality-and-Wounds optional rule exists for a reason, too. But your system isn't applying that one, AFAICT.
HP is 10+2Con+1/2Lvl+Misc. So 5 con, level 1 means 20hp. 10 con, level 1 means 30hp. 5 con, level 20 means 30hp. 10 con, level 20 means 40hp. So on.

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Depending on what you need to do for a finisher, remember.
Crit for a sufficiently large amount of damage. Which could be hard if the opponent is, say, by a third story window and you're on the ground. Or if they're behind two big burly dudes who would like to send you a message about hurting their little buddy using a very particular form of body language. And some props.

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But then, logically, a rapier isn't going to puncture plate armour's breastplate, pretty much ever. So does wearing plate armour make you immune to rapier trusts puncturing the heart?
No. But it does make it harder, increasing AC, and it gives DR so it'll do at least a little less. One would imagine having to stab through the collar or arm would be less effective, after all.

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No? Then I'd say you need not make them sweat it too much if they're weaponizing a silver piece to improvise a silver weapon to deliver that same final blow (assuming they need to deliver it with silver, just as an example).
If a material was viable, I wouldn't question it beyond how much damage they'd do. (Though we use silver a bit differently.)

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No? Depends on how long you need to deprive them of air.
But then we're getting into the "should enemies finish off a downed (regenerating) PC" debate, which I've got no interest in.
Me neither.

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What, in their bloodstream? That's a much, much worse injury, almost untreatable and almost always lethal, AFAIK. So let the Children hope the answer is "no", because it's not the enemy's problem if that happens.
Air embolisms usually resolve themselves, actually, and are very easy to treat if they're caught. They can be fatal, they just usually aren't. And I'd imagine a body capable of regeneration from all manner of injury would be basically immune to injury from embolisms.

But no, I meant the sucking chest wounds they probably received fighting you as holes in the chest are pretty common injuries when people want you dead.

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...I guess, if you're measuring the likelihood of dying (not of being unable to fight), that might make sense. But overall, it's the opposite of how I would expect weapons to work. (Stabbing kills with far less effort, if you hit a vital organ, but have an easier time bypassing most armours. Slashing disables much faster, is more likely to kill you by bloodloss, but most armours protect better against it. Assuming PCs would wear some kind of armour, that's not a simulation I'd be happy with).
A slash can more easily strike major blood vessels and when it does it will kill faster and more reliably than a thrust to the same vessel as it doesn't have any real chance to glance it and leaves a wound that takes longer to close. A cut to the head is also much easier to land, and sufficiently deadly.

Meanwhile, a thrust can more easily strike the heart or deeper, more important parts of the brain, get between vertebrae and penetrate some deeper blood vessels cuts struggle to reach. However, this takes more precise aim.

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See breastplate, above.
Also, I'd expect a smart player to invest in gear that covers his weakness if any is available. Not that there's a market for magic items in the settings I run, but if there was, that would be the smart choice, obviously...so why would I discourage it?
It needn't even be magic. And I'm not saying to discourage it, just that it'd be better to make the weakness one that can't be negated so completely.

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Maybe, but that's my last post for today!
Fair enough.







 

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