D&d 3.5 Lego class idea or Salad Bar Pcs - Myth-Weavers

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D&d 3.5 Lego class idea or Salad Bar Pcs

   
D&d 3.5 Lego class idea or Salad Bar Pcs

I just had a fun sounding idea, and wanted to kick it around see how it worked out.

Disclaimer: I am passingly familiar with a number of other systems that would do what I'm about to suggest better. So, while I recognize none of this will be new territory for RPGs at large, I thought it might be a fun thought experiment that might help those groups locked into a "D&D 3.5 only" mindset to experience what else there is to offer. Additionally, this is, I'm sure, very optimizer unfriendly, at least from a gm's perspective. I imagine that, if implemented, this would work best for groups on the mid to low side of the optimization scale.

So, the basic idea is building your class yourself. This may or may not dovetail into how the classes were made originally: that's not really where I was going with this.

Essentially, every character starts with full bab, and all good saves. They then can downgrade these things in exchange for other class abilities. You can downgrade each save once, from good progression to poor progression, and you can downgrade your bab twice, from good, to average, to poor.

Now, that said, not all class abilities are created equal. So, to begin with, do not include any sort of full casting in this system. I just don't think there's any way to break those classes down into usable chunks for this idea. After all, for most of the casters, casting is almost all of their class abilities.

To continue, treat each class ability with a full length progression (fighter feats, sneak attack, invocations, etc.) as a single downgrade each. Treat any class abilities with half length progression (mostly thinking of rogue talents, without doing more research) as one half a downgrade, rounded up upon completing the design process. Treat any single-level, individual class abilities (trapfinding, deceive item, woodland stride, etc.) As one fourth of a downgrade, rounded up upon completing the design process. Characters start with no weapon or armor proficiencies. Treat each upgrade in weapon or armor proficiency as one fourth of a downgrade, rounded up upon completing the design process.


Unfinished:
I have no idea what to do about skills and class skill lists yet, but I'm leaning towards picking a middle of the road number for both, then letting you lose them at some rate for more class abilities, and gain them at some rate via your normal bab/save downgrades. I have no numbers now, as I am at work, posting from my phone.

Pros:
Vastly more customizable characters
Encourages players to write their own fluff for their custom class, and helps them really own the character
Should be a decent, but not overpowering, upgrade for many of the lower power classes

Cons:
Not terribly user friendly
Must plan class out from start to finish
Lots more homework for players
May be difficult for gm to gauge individual power level early on


Apologies for any glaring formatting problems, but what do you think? Is the idea coherent? Interesting? Not glaringly broken, either in the powerful or nonfunctional sense?

Not the first time I've seen something like this suggested, but I've seen some loose, somewhat official rules for building your own class for Pathfinder (Paizo shared their guidelines in Unchained).

Furthermore, and a better example, if the FFd20 Freelancer class, which gives out far more exact rules for building your own class based on what other classes offer. It's interesting, but easy to muchinkize (although apparently the dev's of FFd20 took some precautions when designing the freelancer).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yamazaki View Post
Not the first time I've seen something like this suggested, but I've seen some loose, somewhat official rules for building your own class for Pathfinder (Paizo shared their guidelines in Unchained).
I think I have that one at home, I'll have to take a look. At the moment, I don't have any plans to use this, I just thought it sounded fun, and semi-workable, so there's not any special urgency to get it polished.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yamazaki View Post
Furthermore, and a better example, if the FFd20 Freelancer class, which gives out far more exact rules for building your own class based on what other classes offer. It's interesting, but easy to muchinkize (although apparently the dev's of FFd20 took some precautions when designing the freelancer).
That's an interesting one. And I feel like, for the most part, their numbers are reasonably close to my own fractional version. Theirs definitely has more anti-munchkin measures in place, though. It seems like if I needed to, I might be able to just steal their version, but I sorta like the idea of trading off your good numbers for abilities. I realize the mechanical differences are minimal, I think it puts players in a different mental state.

Unearthed Arcana's "Generic Classes" do a decent job of this if you allow multiclassing between them.

http://www.d20srd.org/srd/variant/cl...ricClasses.htm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dalar View Post
Unearthed Arcana's "Generic Classes" do a decent job of this if you allow multiclassing between them.

http://www.d20srd.org/srd/variant/cl...ricClasses.htm
Those are pretty good for the core stuff. Have you seen any stuff elsewhere to incorporate the classes outside core?

No, though I haven't looked that hard. Most groups I'm in don't enforce multiclassing XP penalties, so we usually multiclass if we want a character that can do a blend of stuff.

Otherwise, homebrew can cover things if the DM approves.








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