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Sailors on the Silver Sea: An Astral Adventure

 
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Old Mar 28 '18, 9:10pm
AnemoneEnemy AnemoneEnemy is offline
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Sailors on the Silver Sea: An Astral Adventure

Until the Sea Shall Free Them - Forum
Dungeon World



...and when he knew for certain
Only drowning men could hear him,
He said "All men will be sailors, then!
Until the sea shall free them..."



Hi, folks!

I've been running a Dungeon World game set in the D&D Astral Sea for a little while now. It's been great, but we've had two players drop out due to real-life concerns, so we're recruiting two players. Now's your chance, whether you've wanted to try Dungeon World, been nostalgic for Planescape, or just think that an endless silver sea full of ancient ruins and mysterious islands sounds cool.

You don't need to be particularly familiar with the setting. Here are the basics: people in your typical D&D worlds have their souls go to the Astral Plane as they die, where if they're lucky they wake up inside the dominion of whatever deity they worshipped. If they're not lucky, they wake up outside it, locked out of it and unable to enter, and have to make their own afterlife out in the Astral.
These dominions are like bubbles or islands in the Astral Sea, and they are some of the biggest established locations in the Astral, though by no means the only ones.
The Astral Sea stretches on forever, and the further you go, the less stuff you encounter, and the stranger that stuff is.

The current players have a stolen Githyanki battle-skiff, the Lich Queen's Grasp, and a small crew of unlikely personages whom they rescued from galley-slavery. They just finished up a treasure-pilfering mission that didn't go nearly as well as they hoped, and they're currently making a stop at Ioun's Archive of Obsolete Knowledge, a small mote in the Deep Astral.

If you're interested in joining up, feel free to work up a character concept. Tell me how long you've been dead (and therefore roaming the Astral) and a little about who you are and why you're chossing to sail the dangerous Deep Astral rather than making a new life for yourself in a divine dominion, border island, or Astral city.


Wake: the silver dusk returning
Up the beach of darkness brims,
And the ship of sunrise burning
Strands upon the eastern rims.

Wake: the vaulted shadow shatters,
Trampled to the floor it spanned,
And the tent of night in tatters
Straws the sky-pavilioned land.

Up, lad, up, 'tis late for lying:
Hear the drums of morning play;
Hark, the empty highways crying
"Who'll beyond the hills away?"



This is my first time running Dungeon World, but now that I've been running this game for a while, I've got a pretty good grasp on the feedback loop at the heart of the game and feel more than comfortable running it via PbP.

For setting inspiration, I'd recommend the (really excellent) D&D 4E The Plane Above book on the Astral for the basics, and the various AD&D 2E Planescape material for strange specifics.



Game Description:

The Deep Astral stretches out into endless nothing, a silver sea full of cold stars and shifting colors. It is dotted with ruined dominions, ancient towers, islands haunting and haunted, mysteries more final than death has turned out to be.
Endless, far from the thriving dominions of the gods, far from the merchant outposts, far from everything, close to the numinous--the far corners of the Silver Sea are not a predictable place, nor a safe one. Astral skiffs and stranger craft sail into it, and sometimes they bring back wealth and wonder and power, and sometimes they bring back stories and glory and knowledge, and sometimes they do not return.

A woman may find her grief in the Silver Sea, or leave it behind there. A man may go chasing his heart's desire, and leave his heart behind. A crew may come back with a hold full of wealth, or hearts full of beauty, or minds full of strange and senseless songs that push them, guide them, change them.

You, sailor, feel the pull of the Sea like a silver cord tied to your soul. No careful, profit-counting merchant, you: you've thrown caution to the wyrd-winds that fill your craft's sails and gone out to see sights even the gods haven't laid eyes on.


Are you new to the shifting currents and uncharted islands of the Deep Astral?
Are you a seasoned sailor, with successful voyages after your belt, wise enough to survive but foolish enough to return?
Are you one who has lost something to the Deep, or are you lost to it?
Are you searching for something, or leaving something--or everything--behind?

Do you sail seeking power, seeking knowledge, seeking peace, seeking freedom?

Welcome, Sailor! The Silver Sea awaits!


Last edited by AnemoneEnemy; Mar 28 '18 at 10:49pm..
I was looking at bard or thief but i haven't had time to put a character together

there are a couple base ideas, I've got a lot of reading to do to catch up to where everyone is. I've read enough to understand the mechanics I think.

Quote:
Originally Posted by orcwbigstick View Post
there are a couple base ideas, I've got a lot of reading to do to catch up to where everyone is. I've read enough to understand the mechanics I think.
Take your time and go concept first. A dynamic personality that'll mesh with the existing ones is the most important thing.

You also don't have to flesh everything about in a vacuum. Take a look at the existing character application threads--I ask a lot of leading questions and let the player fill in the blanks.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AnemoneEnemy View Post
DW isn't really like FATE in that it doesn't have Aspects. DW does have moves that let you shape the narrative, and it has the GM ask you a lot of leading questions that give you input into the narrative.
Actually, Fate's pretty flexable, I've attempted to explain to my players that when you send a fate point to invoke an aspect, you do gain quite a bit of narrative power. Then we ask questions and shape it. I'm big on allowing players to take a narrative in FATE but either a fate point is required, or you have to be in a place where taking the narrative makes since, because it's your home turf, (or something like that). How I saw it similar to fate is that it's moves are kinda like aspects, and it allows the shaping of the narrative or bonuses to rolls to get desired effects for the story.


Quote:
Originally Posted by orcwbigstick View Post
Actually, Fate's pretty flexable, I've attempted to explain to my players that when you send a fate point to invoke an aspect, you do gain quite a bit of narrative power. Then we ask questions and shape it. I'm big on allowing players to take a narrative in FATE but either a fate point is required, or you have to be in a place where taking the narrative makes since, because it's your home turf, (or something like that). How I saw it similar to fate is that it's moves are kinda like aspects, and it allows the shaping of the narrative or bonuses to rolls to get desired effects for the story.
Yeah, FATE is my RL group's go-to game. The difference is more that FATE encourages players to be pro-active (spend FATE points for narration) whereas Dungeon World doesn't have an actual mechanism for player narration but encourages the GM to turn to the player and ask them leading questions.


@AnemoneEnemy

I'm unsure if I'm going to apply, but I was wondering if you have any opinions on these particular 3rd party playbooks? You already mentioned The Princess so I'll leave that out:

The Cultist

The Dashing Hero

The Cleric

The Witch

The Brute

I look forward to seeing what y'all come up with -- this game is fantastic, and AE is a brilliant GM who writes extremely evocative scenes.

As to Dungeon World, I think if you like FATE you'll love DW. If you love FATE, you'll at the very least like DW if not absolutely, positively adore it. Taken on its own and not compared to anything, I will say DW is just plain a hell of a lot of fun to play and, when you have a good GM who asks the right questions, it shines in ways I didn't know an RPG could shine... and I've played a lot of RPGs!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cairo View Post
@AnemoneEnemy

I'm unsure if I'm going to apply, but I was wondering if you have any opinions on these particular 3rd party playbooks? You already mentioned The Princess so I'll leave that out:

The Cultist

The Dashing Hero

The Cleric

The Witch

The Brute
I'm afraid I haven't shelled out the $2.50 for any of these. Looking at the previews, the Cultist is a little too sinister, the Dashing Hero seems significantly too strong but like a really good time anyway, I'm uncertain about the Witch but it should be OK, the Cleric seems like a great alternative to the core version, and the Brute is a little one-note. I'm willing to be talked around to any of them by a strong character concept.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnemoneEnemy View Post
I'm willing to be talked around to any of them by a strong character concept.
Thank you for your insights! I'll grab the Princess, Hero and Cleric and see if any of them inspire me to create something fun.

Edit:
Ignore hero, I noted pushback in the OOC thread.

Application!

Hey there! I'd love to play in this game, as it looks particularly interesting with the fact that we're all already dead. That, combined with your beautiful description of the Astral Sea, has me intrigued. I should note, however, that I am new to Myth-weavers, so apologies if I make any basic mistakes in regards to how to do certain things or general etiquette. I have a character concept, but if it would not fit then I would absolutely be able to make another:

"Halwyr is an elf with some particularly notable magical abilities.
Was. He was still getting used to that.
Halwyr was an elf with some particularly notable magical abilities. He knew things that others didn't, he thinks, and he likely knew how to use that to the best of his ability. He was book smart, probably, but he does know this: he hates having to use such unclear terms to describe his life.
How is it that he can tell a person the exact amount of scales on a new-born wyrm (182), or correct them when they claim that a Worg's claws never grow back (they will, given a high enough calcium diet, even though such circumstances are unlikely in the wild), yet not be able to recall the faces of his parents? Or their names?
How was it that everyone else he had encountered so far was able to tell him every last detail about his life, but he could not conjure up even one?
It was a sad irony, to be able to recall a fact but not recall where it was from.
It was almost like a form of torture, or a particularly convoluted riddle. He had appeared in the afterlife and what was supposed to be paradise, but unable to access the thing he valued most. He couldn't live with it, despite how hard he tried. Halwyr knew he was in for an eternity of imprecisions, and there was nothing he could do about it if he stayed where he was and pretended to be happy.
Therefore, after a month and a day of unlife, Halwyr found himself standing on the edge of the territory he appeared in and ready to leave with his gear in his pack. The first step outside of the relative safety of the bubble was liberating, but this didn't distract him from the goal at hand: to figure out his past."

Halwyr is an elven wizard who lost his memories upon death. He doesn't know how he died, or when, or how old he was. He can still remember objective facts, such as the capitals of certain kingdoms, but he can't remember anything relating to his personal life. His goal is to try and rediscover these memories and what took them away from him. He looks fairly young, as though he were in his twenties, with black, slicked back hair and stylish robes.







 

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