Jump to content

About This Game

A fantasy nation building game with elements of worldbuilding, pvp, roleplay, and strategy. New players welcome!

Game System

Empire!

Advertising

05/26/2024

Detailed Description

Empire!4 Reloaded

GMs: PotatoPriest, Zayuz, Avonthes

With special thanks to Rolepgeek, Minescratcher, Lleban, and Tentreto for writing the rules, 
Rolepgeek, Minescratcher and Tentreto for writing some of our lore posts, 
And the fantastic Lleban for the map.

 

Welcome to Empire!4 Reloaded! This is an offshoot of the Empire! series of play-by-post worldbuilding and nation building games. The current main title in this series is Minescratcher’s Empire!8This offshoot game is aimed at recruiting newer players and giving them a classic Empire experience with a simpler and more archaic rule set. If you were a player in Empire 1, 2, 3, or 4, we love you but you are ineligible to play in Empire4! Reloaded. 

We aim to recruit around 20 players, and recruiting will remain open until we do, though the game is scheduled to begin on May 26.

 

Setting

One hundred years ago, Dejan the Golden arrived at the site of his final conquest. He had fought in every corner of the known world; broke bread and bones with every people, and united them all under a single banner. His empire, powerful and vast, was to bring an eternal peace to the varied lands of Emjata - but it was not to be. On the eve of his final conquest he was struck down by a bolt of lightning from the sky, and since that day the Avakonian Empire has been in a spiral of decay and misfortune that has allowed new powers to spring to life, as well as the reassertion of the old that have been trampled by the great conqueror. Nobody knows why Dejan was smote by lightning: some say that he was struck down by the gods for his hubris. Others claim the powerful magic of a jealous rival. Others still whisper that in his great valiance he was uplifted to divinity itself, but with time the truth has only become more obscured.

 

Welcome to the lands of Emjata, where the world once conquered and ruled by the glorious Avakonian Empire has begun to fracture and collapse under the weight of its complexity and decadence. EMPIRE! has the player take on the role of a faction that controls land, resources, and military might over many generations of rulers, the form of which can be as you please. Forge history with and against your fellow powers! As this is a collaborative worldbuilding game, but also a social strategy game, be ready to fight while remembering not to tread on the enjoyment of other players.

 

Featuring warfare, intrigue, romance and politics, we encourage players to generally follow a tone befitting an analogous fall of the (fantasy) Roman Empire with the expected content being rated 16+. As the writer of your own faction, you may choose the general tone that your writing sets within this sphere. This game also uses a community discord server. Participation in the discord is not mandatory, but encouraged since a lot of political deals happen there.

 

  1. What's new in this game
  2. Commonwealth of Uhrasa Region 47 (Graiar) Geography The land of Uhrasa takes its name from the great northern sea that it borders. Uhrasa is a land of thin isthmuses between larger bodies of water. The land is forested, but the available land area is too small to continuously feed a large population if tilled and harvested. Instead, the forests are kept in place and tended to reduce overgrowth. The land is poor in mineral resources, the closest thing to mineral wealth to be found is clay on the shoreline. The capital of Uhrasa, Stormharbor, is on the coast of Uhraiya, about roughly equally distant from the two great lakes south of the province. People and Culture The people of Uhrasa are a slim majority of Sea Elves(~55%), though humans are almost as common (~40%). Life revolves around the sea to almost every extent possible. Most meals are fish, timber overwhelmingly goes to repairing fishing boats, and their faith is practiced on docks extending into the ocean. Each Uhrasan learns to swim before they can remember the experience. Those who brave deep waters are honored and celebrated like heroes when they come back from trade with distant lands. The Sea Elves traditionally hold most seats of power in the High Tide Assembly, though this is due more to their lineage and longevity, rather than formal or informal discrimination against humans. They are seen to have a deeper connection to the sea, being over-represented as Stormseers and navigators. Though they will use technologies that they know, they are slow to innovate and sooner to turn to faith than innovate. The Humans of Uhrasa are the most responsible for the current state of its shipyards, developing many shipbuilding techniques that have since spread far from Uhrasa. They are over-represented in the workforce assembling these ships and designing new ones. Descended from immigrants, whether in the last century or well before, these humans are also more likely to volunteer for long, uncertain voyages to distant lands. Despite the general harmony between the two communities, tensions do tend to appear. While human ingenuity is responsible for many of the innovations that make Uhrasa a shipbuilding power, in this they tend to reach and exploit resources the Sea Elves have kept protected. The Sea Elves sometimes feel a connection to maritime resources or populations, and declare it sacred to Rieba. While almost no-one will deny the power of Rieba, the Humans tend towards seeing their patron Goddess as a more forgiving goddess, willing to share her domain with all. The Sea Elves fear the wrath of Rieba, which causes tensions. History Uhrasa was founded in the murky past. Their name, which means "Those who come from the central Sea", originally referred to a loose collection of peoples, rather than an official designated state. When founded, the original state of Uhrasa was governed by a council of Sea Elf elders, those oldest were viewed as wisest and most fit to rule. Over time, human populations moved into the area and settled, either as runaway slaves from Avakonia, or merchants coming to rest in a favored trade city. Before Dejan's conquest, humans were deemed lesser than elves, unfit to own a seafaring vessel or sit as an elder. However, this existed as a constant tension when Uhrasa dealt with more powerful human neighbours, such as Avakonia. The state of Uhrasa was conquered by Dejan relatively early on in his conquest, and a significant number of the ships that ferried his troops to the far regions of Emjata were constructed in Uhrasa. This push for industry was motivated by a cull of the elders who previously ruled Uhrasa, something which also had the function of resetting the ancestral memory of the Sea Elves. What was once known fact had become speculation, legend, and half-heard rumor. Over the last century, Uhrasa has become increasingly similar in culture to Avakonia. Sailors came back generation after generation, bringing with them the ideas they saw at the center of the world. Though they cannot keep up with the ever-changing trends of Avakonia, Uhrasans have an acute greed for luxury and novelty. Government Uhrasa is ruled by a council of powerful landowners known as the High Tide assembly. These landowners must own both land and a large sea-faring vessel in order to sit on the council. The Council is headed by an official elected from this council, known as the Tidewarden. The Tidewarden serves for life. In the event of a ruler’s death, the council convenes as soon as possible to select a successor Tidewarden. Economy Resource: Shipyards The economy of Uhrasa depends mostly or entirely on the sea. Most of the meals eaten by the Uhrasa people come from the sea, as fishermen make up a majority of the population. Due to the extreme mineral scarcity on the isthmuses, Uhrasa is voracious for all types of metal. In centuries past, many trading outposts have been set up for the sole purpose of sourcing iron and bronze. Required resource: Hard Metals Faith The dominant faith in Uhrasa is that of Perijanism, with an almost exclusive focus on Rieba, the goddess of the sea and knowledge. The faith of Abhidi has the largest minority presence in Uhrasa, with the other faiths being restricted to small cults and out-of-the-way churches. The other gods in Perijanism are minimized because of the overwhelming focus of the sea on their way of life. In Uhrasa, Rieba is viewed primarily as a god of wrath and storms to be placated, rather than a lifegiver or goddess of wisdom. Priests of Rieba, known as Stormseers, are required by local custom to accompany each ship produced in Uhrasa. If no Stormseers are at hand, the ship will sit in dock until one can be found. The magical tradition of Uhrasa centers around the Stormseers, who command great power while on the sea, calming the waves and saving ships. From the deepest creatures of the Abyss, marrow is extracted from the bones of fresh kills. This marrow is rendered into tallow, burned on a pyre placed delicately upon the prow of the vessel. While it yet burns, the Stormseer holds sway. If doused, so is their power. While not on the water from which their tallow was sourced, their power wanes greatly, unable to influence much of anything. State Religion: Perijanism Majority Religion: Perijanism Minority Religion: Abhidi Leader Name: Kairos Windrider Title: Tidewarden Race: Sea Elf Age: 43 Attributes: Diplomacy = 3 Military = 2 Economy = 5 Faith = 5 Intrigue = 3
  3. The tallow sacrifice is some awesome flavor. Approved! Very fun writeup. Horror swamp elves is a neat concept! Approved. Sorry Sonnywalker for overlooking you. I only need one thing before approving this writeup: Necessary for Approval: Resource and required resource should each be only one thing. The required resource can be a category, like "hard metals" but it should still just be one thing.
  4. roll Special ultra-mega bonus reroll is... A 4 So Faith 4, Military 3, Economy 2, Intrigue 2 (I guess) Diplomacy 1. With an added +1 to any two attributes, so... Faith 5, Military 4, Economy 2, Intrigue 2, Diplomacy 1
  5. Roll Let us see what sort of hand fate deals the miserable bastard running Khur... All right, that looks like a 3 for Faith (big shocker, I know), a 2 for Military, a 2 for Economy, 1 in Intrigue, and 1 in Diplomacy. WE ARE SMART IN KHUR.
  6. I've finished my app. I rushed things a bit at the end, just wanted to get it finished before I started a block of night shifts, but I hope it's alright. I had fun making that flag.
  7. You can roll here. It's a little awkward, but once we have an in character thread it won't be so strange. You can edit it without impacting the dice roll. Necessary for Approval: Explicitly list majority and minority religions (see all the other people I made do this for a style guide) If you want Uhrasa to be the name of your country, I need a name for region 47. If you want it to be the name of region 47, I need a name for the country. This helps prevent confusion in the event you expand past your starting region. Not necessary for Approval: Since it seems like the Uhrasans are seeking metal for practical uses (as opposed to silver, gold etc), I'd like to change the resource requirement to "hard metals" to bring it in line with everyone else. Shipyards is an acceptable resource, but I'm wondering if you might prefer a resource of ships. (The difference has fluff implications for the scale at which foreigners tap into your economy) I want to know more about the culture of Uhrasa. How do the humans and sea elves get along? I'm curious what kind of sacrifices the stormseers make to Rieba to control the seas. I see you decided to change the term limits to "for life." This will certainly be more convenient for you as a player, but you if you want to you can run with term limits and it's a bold flavorful choice. I personally have done a playthrough with a 3 turn term limit. If you did choose to keep the 10 year (5 turn) term limits I would recommend allowing the same ruler to only serve once though, as the nature of the game doesn't allow you to bring back past rulers with the same stats.
  8. Oh yeah, guess I should roll up my Chief Douchebag's numbers, shouldn't I? :P We do that here or elsewhere?
  9. Apologies for the poor formatting, I've not used Baldr before. I'm also reluctant to edit the post in order to fix it because of the dice rolls. Is there a way to edit it down without endangering the legitmacy of the dice roll? Also, for any GM I'd like to change the term limit of the Tidewarden to 'until death', rather than every 10 years.
  10. Here's the first initial draft for Uhrasa, region 47. I'm not terribly attached to any particular detail, so all of it is up to change except for the seafaring focus. Commonwealth of Uhrasa Region 47 (Graiar) Geography The land of Uhrasa takes its name from the great northern sea that it borders. Uhrasa is a land of thin isthmuses between larger bodies of water. The land is forested, but the available land area is too small to continuously feed a large population if tilled and harvested. Instead, the forests are kept in place and tended to reduce overgrowth. The land is poor in mineral resources, the closest thing to mineral wealth to be found is clay on the shoreline. The capital of Uhrasa, Stormharbor, is on the coast of Uhraiya, about roughly equally distant from the two great lakes south of the province. People and Culture The people of Uhrasa are a slim majority of Sea Elves(~55%), though humans are almost as common (~40%). Life revolves around the sea to almost every extent possible. Most meals are fish, timber overwhelmingly goes to repairing fishing boats, and their faith is practiced on docks extending into the ocean. Each Uhrasan learns to swim before they can remember the experience. Those who brave deep waters are honored and celebrated like heroes when they come back from trade with distant lands. The Sea Elves traditionally hold most seats of power in the High Tide Assembly, though this is due more to their lineage and longevity, rather than formal or informal discrimination against humans. They are seen to have a deeper connection to the sea, being over-represented as Stormseers and navigators. Though they will use technologies that they know, they are slow to innovate and sooner to turn to faith than innovate. The Humans of Uhrasa are the most responsible for the current state of its shipyards, developing many shipbuilding techniques that have since spread far from Uhrasa. They are over-represented in the workforce assembling these ships and designing new ones. Descended from immigrants, whether in the last century or well before, these humans are also more likely to volunteer for long, uncertain voyages to distant lands. Despite the general harmony between the two communities, tensions do tend to appear. While human ingenuity is responsible for many of the innovations that make Uhrasa a shipbuilding power, in this they tend to reach and exploit resources the Sea Elves have kept protected. The Sea Elves sometimes feel a connection to maritime resources or populations, and declare it sacred to Rieba. While almost no-one will deny the power of Rieba, the Humans tend towards seeing their patron Goddess as a more forgiving goddess, willing to share her domain with all. The Sea Elves fear the wrath of Rieba, which causes tensions. History Uhrasa was founded in the murky past. Their name, which means "Those who come from the central Sea", originally referred to a loose collection of peoples, rather than an official designated state. When founded, the original state of Uhrasa was governed by a council of Sea Elf elders, those oldest were viewed as wisest and most fit to rule. Over time, human populations moved into the area and settled, either as runaway slaves from Avakonia, or merchants coming to rest in a favored trade city. Before Dejan's conquest, humans were deemed lesser than elves, unfit to own a seafaring vessel or sit as an elder. However, this existed as a constant tension when Uhrasa dealt with more powerful human neighbours, such as Avakonia. The state of Uhrasa was conquered by Dejan relatively early on in his conquest, and a significant number of the ships that ferried his troops to the far regions of Emjata were constructed in Uhrasa. This push for industry was motivated by a cull of the elders who previously ruled Uhrasa, something which also had the function of resetting the ancestral memory of the Sea Elves. What was once known fact had become speculation, legend, and half-heard rumor. Over the last century, Uhrasa has become increasingly similar in culture to Avakonia. Sailors came back generation after generation, bringing with them the ideas they saw at the center of the world. Though they cannot keep up with the ever-changing trends of Avakonia, Uhrasans have an acute greed for luxury and novelty. Government Uhrasa is ruled by a council of powerful landowners known as the High Tide assembly. These landowners must own both land and a large sea-faring vessel in order to sit on the council. The Council is headed by an official elected from this council, known as the Tidewarden. The Tidewarden serves for life. In the event of a ruler’s death, the council convenes as soon as possible to select a successor Tidewarden. Economy Resource: Shipyards The economy of Uhrasa depends mostly or entirely on the sea. Most of the meals eaten by the Uhrasa people come from the sea, as fishermen make up a majority of the population. Due to the extreme mineral scarcity on the isthmuses, Uhrasa is voracious for all types of metal. In centuries past, many trading outposts have been set up for the sole purpose of sourcing iron and bronze. Required resource: Hard Metals Faith The dominant faith in Uhrasa is that of Perijanism, with an almost exclusive focus on Rieba, the goddess of the sea and knowledge. The faith of Abhidi has the largest minority presence in Uhrasa, with the other faiths being restricted to small cults and out-of-the-way churches. The other gods in Perijanism are minimized because of the overwhelming focus of the sea on their way of life. In Uhrasa, Rieba is viewed primarily as a god of wrath and storms to be placated, rather than a lifegiver or goddess of wisdom. Priests of Rieba, known as Stormseers, are required by local custom to accompany each ship produced in Uhrasa. If no Stormseers are at hand, the ship will sit in dock until one can be found. The magical tradition of Uhrasa centers around the Stormseers, who command great power while on the sea, calming the waves and saving ships. From the deepest creatures of the Abyss, marrow is extracted from the bones of fresh kills. This marrow is rendered into tallow, burned on a pyre placed delicately upon the prow of the vessel. While it yet burns, the Stormseer holds sway. If doused, so is their power. While not on the water from which their tallow was sourced, their power wanes greatly, unable to influence much of anything. State Religion: Perijanism Majority Religion: Perijanism Minority Religion: Abhidi Leader Name: Kairos Windrider Title: Tidewarden Race: Sea Elf Age: 43 Attributes: Diplomacy = 3 Military = 2 Economy = 5 Faith = 5 Intrigue = 3 Approval Changes and Responses Necessary for Approval: Explicitly list majority and minority religions (see all the other people I made do this for a style guide). Changed. Listed under the ‘faith’ heading. If you want Uhrasa to be the name of your country, I need a name for region 47. If you want it to be the name of region 47, I need a name for the country. This helps prevent confusion in the event you expand past your starting region. "Commonwealth of Uhrasa" will be the name of the country. The name for region 47 will be Graiar. Not necessary for Approval: Since it seems like the Uhrasans are seeking metal for practical uses (as opposed to silver, gold etc), I'd like to change the resource requirement to "hard metals" to bring it in line with everyone else. Yes, the metals are primarily for practical uses. Changed. Shipyards is an acceptable resource, but I'm wondering if you might prefer a resource of ships. (The difference has fluff implications for the scale at which foreigners tap into your economy) I’m fine with the resource being shipyards. The region has been under at least de jure control of another power for a long time; I don’t think the Uhrasans care overly much about foreigners showing up to influence their economy. I think it’ll be interesting playing a power that has fewer barriers in this way. I want to know more about the culture of Uhrasa. How do the humans and sea elves get along? Added more detail. Both in the people and culture section, as well as expanding on their history. I'm curious what kind of sacrifices the Stormseers make to Rieba to control the seas. Added. From the deepest creatures of the Abyss, marrow is extracted from the bones of fresh kills. This marrow is rendered into tallow, burned on a pyre placed delicately upon the prow of the vessel. While it yet burns, the Stormseer holds sway. If doused, so is their power. Asking the GM(s) here, would the ability to create the tallow used for Stormseer sacrifice be something secret to Uhrasa? Uhrasa would at least attempt to keep it a secret, in order to have a lever to pull when trading ships to greater powers. I see you decided to change the term limits to "for life." This will certainly be more convenient for you as a player, but you if you want to you can run with term limits and it's a bold flavorful choice. I personally have done a playthrough with a 3 turn term limit. If you did choose to keep the 10 year (5 turn) term limits I would recommend allowing the same ruler to only serve once though, as the nature of the game doesn't allow you to bring back past rulers with the same stats. I think for my first game I’ll keep the ‘for life’ ruler.
  11. With the game scheduled to start on Sunday there is some bookkeeping work the GM team needs to do to set it up, and some of it requires player writeups to be finished. I would ideally like to have everyone's writeup approved by this Friday the 24th so that we can make sure everyone's required resource is present and distribute player religions sensibly about the map. If you miss this deadline, you might be at a moderate disadvantage when it comes to spreading your religion and finding your required resource, but it won't stop you from playing.
  12. Let's go with the one in the river mouth being originally founded in Tumir. You can name the port since it's in your area, I don't want to step on your stuff too much.
  13. Yes, it would be no problem for the Tumireans to have founded one of the two ports, you can even name it. The options are one locate on Roak Island, where there are Lizardfolk and at various times pirates, or at the mouth of the River Baria, which separates North Baria from Baria proper. Alternately, you could add one further north on the coast near Mount K'nack.
  14. The Vykronan Crescent Region 5 Kingdom of Tumir (Flag Goes Here) Geography Tumir is a kingdom located in the Vykronan Crescent on the sub-continent of Regner, situated between the Ephoristes River in the South, the Kaldores River in the north, the Ortassa Sea in the east, and the southern end of the Vykronan Mountain Range. Much of the area surrounding the two rivers is farmland, while mines dot the southern parts of the mountains. Much of Tumir is fairly flat and prone to flooding from particularly heavy rains or mountain snow melt. These lands are lush in agriculture near the two rivers, with some more arid desert in the distance between them. In the west, however, it grows hilly and more rugged. Here, the more arid climate is much more pronounced, and what plant life grows here is mostly scrubgrass, grazed upon primarily by mountain goats. There are six major cities in Tumir: Dur-Bargaz is the northeastern-most city, lying in the foothills of the Vykronan Mountains. This fortified city is where the output of much of the country’s mines is concentrated before being shipped to other parts of the country. Sarum is located at the headwater of the Ephoristes River. What mines don’t feed into Dur-Bargaz feed into Sarum, and much of the region’s stone is quarried here. Pilgar is located at the mouth of the Ephoristes River, where it meets the Ortassa Sea, and is one of two port cities in Tumir. Pilgar is home to the Royal Palace, and is the center of Tumir’s glass-blowing industry. Sebass-Ur is predominantly an agricultural city, located halfway down the Kaldores River. This area is most prone to flooding, so buildings are typically built raised off the ground to minimize damage. Enkasru serves as the predominant port of Tumir, being built on the westernmost peninsula and surrounded by the Ortassa Sea. There is a thriving fishing industry in the city. The Wall of Torgamesh, built where the peninsula meets the mainland, is a massive construction that has held against every land army that has tried to conquer it. However, it can be circumvented by a sufficiently powerful naval force, as its people have learned numerous times - most recently by Dejan. Doran-Tir is the smallest of the major cities, yet also one of the most important. Standing at the midpoint of the Ephoristes River, it is here that the Great Ziggurat of Sareth-Fal stands, where kings must come upon assuming the throne to ensure their reign has the blessing of the gods. Government Tumir is a Kingdom, ruled by King Giramas IV of the Asmurid Dynasty. Giramas IV is a relatively young man in his late 20’s, who just took the throne last year. As such, he is neither beloved of nor hated by his people as they wait and see what kind of king he will be. The King is the most dominant power in Tumir, issuing decrees and laws governing the entire Kingdom, as well as setting taxes and levying soldiers. The king also appoints royal overseers for each region and city, to ensure the decrees and laws are followed. Each city also has a hereditary governor who has the ability to pass laws and decrees for their city, so long as they do not conflict with laws passed by the King. The hereditary governor is permitted to levy a small defense force for the protection of the city, if needed, but is not permitted to use them against either the king or another city. Up until the past one-hundred and fifty years, inheritance law favored male-only primogeniture. Following the reforms of King Tilbanshar I, however, the law was changed to male-preference primogeniture. While this has not yet led to Tumir having a Queen as its ruler, it has hopefully eliminated the possibility of wars of succession, should the King or a hereditary governor die without a male heir. People and Culture The Tumirean people are humans and tend to be on the shorter side, with bronzed skin, dark brown eyes, and brown to black hair. It is considered fashionable for adult males to sport full beards - the longer and more elaborately braided a beard, the higher the social class of the male. Among women, long hair takes the place of the beard, with longer and more elaborate hair signifying the same as beards. Laborers, farmers, and fishermen typically wear knee length tunics of wool with relatively simple embroidery, while craftsmen and merchants wear ankle-length wool tunics with more elaborate embroidery or even linen, if it can be afforded. The aristocracy wear brightly dyed wool and linen with elaborate embroidery. It is also not uncommon for women to wear headdresses, becoming more elaborate at higher social ranks. Jewelry is worn by both men and women, typically made of colored glass, quartz, and bronze. Gold, silver, and other precious metals are rare in Tumir, so what is mined is typically used for coinage. Precious gemstones are all but unheard of. Food in Tumir tends to vary somewhat by region, but the diet typically includes goat, sheep, fish, lentils, peas, cucumbers, dates, figs, and melons. There are also olive groves along the Kaldores River, but these are typically used to make cooking oil, making them a delicacy more commonly enjoyed by the aristocracy. Spices typically include garlic, cardamom, turmeric, and coriander. Sesame is fairly common as well, with the seeds used for many different applications. Wheat and barley are also cultivated, allowing for the baking of flatbread and the brewing of beer. Cheese is made from both sheep’s milk and goat’s milk. The people of Tumir are descended from 7 nomadic tribes which lived in the area prior to settlement - the Pilgar, the Bargaz, the Enkasru, the Doran, the Sebass, the Sarum, and the Assuni. For the majority of their settled history, there has been no unified kingdom of Tumir, and as a consequence, its people tend to be rather independent and competitive between each other. When introducing themselves, Tumireans from one of the cities or regions surrounding it will often include the name of the city they are from in their introduction. Merchants from different cities in the same market will often compete against each other directly, with their success being directly tied to the honor of their city. Past kings have attempted to channel the spirit of this competitiveness into formal sporting competitions, but nothing particularly notable has come of it. Most buildings are constructed from clay bricks, strengthened with marsh reeds in them, although particularly important buildings use stone, brought in from the quarries near Sarum. While the first the other tribes would go on to found the major cities of Tumir, the Assuni have largely kept to their nomadic ways. The Assuni typically travel with pack animals and their herds of sheep and goats between various grazing areas, usually along the same routes and to the same places they were traveling between before the idea of a united Tumir even existed. Assuni do not value precious metals or currency, often making payment for manufactured goods, services, or taxes in the form of livestock and other animal products. Whenever a Tumirean citizen feels like protesting a new tax levied by the King, they will pay tax in “the Assuni way”, giving livestock and animal products in lieu of coin or more easily portable goods. There is also a small Avakonian population, descendants of the soldiers led by the Avakonian General Typhonus when he claimed the title King of Tumir after the Dejan’s death. They are found almost exclusively among the laborers and craftsmen, and are forbidden from carrying weapons by royal decree. History Much of Tumir’s early history was passed down orally from one generation to the next, so it is just as legendary as it is historical. What the legends all generally seem to agree on is that there were seven nomadic tribes within the area, all inhabiting different areas and generally coexisting peacefully. Eventually, six of those tribes founded settlements within the area they lived, which eventually grew into six independent city-states, typically with some number of smaller settlements nearby. While the Tumirean people lack hard founding dates for the city-states, it is generally agreed that all six were established approximately 2000 years ago (around 1900 BD). The city-states would spend the next 300 years alternately trading with and fighting amongst each other, with particularly notable rivalries between Pilgar and Enkasru over orange lumefish fishing grounds, and Dur-Bargaz and Sarum over mining rights. In 1600 BD, the King of Sebass-Ur, Sebestes, marshaled his forces and succeeded in conquering the other five city-states over the course of a 20-year campaign, which ended in him crowning himself King Sebestes I of Tumir. He ruled for 7 more years before he was followed by his son, Sebestes II, who sought to conquer lands south but was rebuffed militarily. He died in battle after only 12 years, leaving his 11 year-old son to take the throne as King Cal-Basid I. The rulers of the other five city-states, sensing weakness, rebelled, and within three years, the Kingdom of Tumir was no more, leaving only the city-states in its wake. Sebestes I had not bothered with the Assuni people, nor did his son or grandson, and so the Assuni people were largely unaffected by the brief unification of Tumir. It would be 500 years before another ruler would succeed in unifying the country. Sometime around 1308 BD, the Priest-King of Doran-Tir, Sareth-Fal, commanded the construction of a Ziggurat, larger than any that had been built before, or would be built since, to be dedicated to all seven gods of the Tumirean Pantheon. It was here, he said, that the gods had told him those who would rule the Tumirean people must come to ask their permission to do so. The Ziggurat took 37 years to build, and upon its completion, Sareth-Fal called for a great celebration. During this celebration, it was noticed that he had disappeared. The next morning, his body was found lying in repose in the central chamber before the statues of the seven deities. It seemed to be smiling and at peace. To this day, no one knows how his death came about, or whether he posed himself before the gods or someone did it for him. 165 years later, the city of Dur-Bargaz were able to smelt tin and copper together to create a stronger, harder metal - bronze. The King of Dur-Bargaz, Giramas, equipped his armies with weapons and armor made of this new metal and set out to unify Tumir. First, he went to the Assuni and demanded their allegiance, which the nomads readily gave. He then conquered the city-state of Doran-Tir. Upon his conquest, he entered the Grand Ziggurat, knelt before the statues of the gods, and asked them to grant him rulership of all Tumir. He then went on to conquer all of the other city-states in the next five years, crowning himself King Giramas I in 1100 BD, later to be known as King Giramas the Great. He ruled Tumir for 37 years, expanding its borders north and south. His son, Avashili I, also went to the Great Ziggurat to ask the gods permission to rule Tumir. He reigned for 26 years, and built the first network of roads between the city-states, facilitating trade and allowing him to move his armies more quickly. He was followed by his son, Giramas II, another who journeyed to the Great Ziggurat. He ordered the copying and distribution of knowledge to all the city-states, to better educate and unify his people. Upon his death 33 years later, his son Kurnezzar I followed him on the throne. Though his 34-year reign was mostly unremarkable, it was also generally prosperous and successful. He, too, had journeyed to the Great Ziggurat upon taking the throne. 5 years into the reign of his son, Avashili II, a plague swept through Tumir, claiming not only Avashili’s life but also those of his wife, children, siblings, nieces, and nephews. Avashili II had not presented himself at the Great Ziggurat. War between the various descendants of Giramas I broke out, and within seven years, the Kingdom had collapsed yet again into city-states in 958 BD. The Assuni were, once again, relatively unaffected by the civil war and collapse of the kingdom. The Kingdom of Tumir would remain fractured for another 330 years, during which time the High Lord of Enkasru, named Torgamesh, built a great wall to defend his city-state on the peninsula from conquest by the other city-states. It was his grandson, Giramas, who would go on to conquer the other city-states in 628 BD to be crowned King Giramas III, who held his coronation ceremony in the Grand Ziggurat of Sareth-Fal, so that the gods could bear witness to his ascension and grant their permission to rule. Though his reign lasted a mere 7 more years, his son Kurnezzar II would go on to conquer all the lands along the Kaldores River in his 24 year reign. His son Cal-Basid II would go on to begin the conquest of lands south and around the coast in his 33 year reign, although the conquest would be finished by his son, Sebestes III. After his 28 year reign, his son Kurnezzar III took the throne. In his 31 year reign, Kurnezzar III had the idea to send forth boats along the coast, to explore and meet other peoples for the possibility of trade and the settling of foreign lands, which led to open trade with the city-states of the Choras River. Kurnezzar III was followed by his son, Avashili III, who, unfortunately, was vain and arrogant. He refused to present himself at the Grand Ziggurat, famously saying, “The gods should be so lucky I have become King of Tumir, for I am as they are.” He believed that by becoming King, he had placed himself on equal footing with the gods, and thus had no need to ask them to rule. This sat very poorly with both the priests and the aristocracy, and it was but 3 years later a coup was launched and he was executed in order to place his infant son, Mashda I, on the throne. However, the aristocrats who came together to form Mashda I’s regency argued amongst themselves, and eventually infighting turned to full on civil war a year later when Mashda died of fever. The Kingdom once again fractured into its various city-states, and Tumir lost control of the lands they had conquered. The Assuni remained unaffected in following their way of life. This third civil war gave rise to what is known as “the Assuni period”. Some of those who lived in the city-states, seeing how unaffected by the collapse of the Kingdom the Assuni people were, began saying that it had been a mistake to found the city-states in the first place, and left to form their own nomadic groups in emulation of the Assuni. For the next 150 years it became fairly common for those disgruntled by the fighting amongst city-states to abandon their lives and join a group of wandering nomads. Sometimes entire groups of soldiers would simply abandon their posting to do so. This became less common as, two Kingdoms rose in the region through diplomatic alliances. The first was the Kingdom of Northern Tumir, consisting of the city-states of Dur-Bargaz, Sebass-Ur, and Enkasru. The other was the Kingdom of Southern Tumir, consisting of the city-states of Sarum, Doran-Tir, and Pilgar. The Assuni traveled between the two unimpeded. These two Kingdoms would exist in an occasional state of war for the next 304 years. During this time, traders from both Kingdoms would make contact with the Avakonians. After a prolonged period of peace, King Asmurus of Southern Tumir and King Zimbir of Northern Tumir both held ambitions of uniting all of Tumir under their rule. Both were wary of prolonged conflict, however, so the two came to an agreement. They would enter the Grand Ziggurat together, and whoever the gods chose would be King of Tumir. It was a trick by Zimbir, however, who stabbed Shar-kali once they were alone in the Grand Ziggurat. He thought this would be the end of it, but the wound was not immediately fatal, and as he was announcing the gods had chosen him over Shar-Kali, the latter staggered from the Ziggurat, bleeding, and accused Zimbir of his treachery. Zimbir was killed attempting to flee, and the armies of both Southern Tumir and Northern Tumir met in the open field outside of Doran-Tir. Asmurus’s son Tilbanshar and Zimbir’s son Shal-kiri faced each other in personal combat as the battle raged around them, until a stray arrow took Shal-kiri in the throat, slaying him. The armies of Northern Tumir routed. Tilbanshar ordered the armies of Southern Tumir to hold in their pursuit, and he entered the Grand Ziggurat to ask the gods for their permission to rule. Afterwards, he led his armies to Sebass-Ur, where he demanded the surrender of the Northern Kingdom to him as punishment for both Zimbir’s treason. They capitulated, and Tilbanshar married Zimbir’s daughter to unite all of Tumir together again, becoming King Tilbanshar I. The Assuni did not partake in the fighting. Well educated on the history of the region, Tilbanshar I began a series of reforms. First he changed the laws of succession to allow for female inheritance, then he made the traditional rulers of the city-states the hereditary governors. He then established the Royal Overseers, who would ensure that the laws and decrees passed by the King were followed. He also properly codified Tumirean law, and reconquered the lands along the Kaldores River. It was in his 42nd year of reign (5 BD) that word reached Tumir of Dejan beginning his conquest. With time to prepare, Tilbanshar I marshaled his forces to defend his kingdom. Dejan arrived a year later, and it took him all of a month to conquer Tumir. Tilbanshar I and his sons were all killed. However, when Dejan’s army seized the Royal Palace in Pilgar, Tilbanshar’s 9-year old grandson, Atabesi, was nowhere to be found. He had vanished. Upon Dejan’s death, one of his Generals, Typhonus, seized control and declared himself King of Tumir. Refusing to ask “inferior” gods for permission to rule a conquered land, he defaced the Grand Ziggurat, and declared Perijanism the official religion of Tumir. What followed was a rebellion against his rule, as none of the city-states voluntarily followed him. It took him five years to finish subduing the rebellious city-states, and it was only through an iron-fisted rule of terror he was able to do so. Having finally done so, Typhonus led his armies back towards Dur-Bargaz, where he had set his government. During the journey, his weary forces were ambushed by people he had dismissed as irrelevant. The Assuni had risen up against him, and the ambush was so effective, that Typhonus’s army was quickly routed, and Typhonus himself was captured and executed by Atabesi, who had been in hiding with the Assuni. Typhonus’s death set off yet another revolution against the lesser generals who claimed succession from him, and in 6 AD, Atabesi had consolidated his rule and been crowned King Atabesi I of Tumir, to the rejoicing of his people. His first act as King was to repair the Grand Ziggurat, and when it was done, he entered and asked the gods for permission to rule. He then set about repairing the damage from Dejan’s conquest and Typhonus’s rule. Atabesi I ruled for 49 years, much of that time spent rebuilding Tumir. His son, Atabesi II, ruled for 17 and finished the rebuild. He considered expanding Tumir’s borders, but such a war was considered unpopular at the time after the violence previously, so he did not do so. He was followed by his son Asmurus I, whose 37 year reign was spent re-establishing trade with their previous trading partners. After his death just last year, his son Giramas was crowned Giramas IV, and with the permission of the gods, is prepared to set about defining his reign. Economy Tumir possesses abundant foodstuffs, but the most valuable are the different varieties of lumefish. Called such due the faint glow they give off even in daytime, lumefish can not just be eaten, their scales can also be used to make dyes for fabric or to color glass, as well as what Tumireans call “lumebulbs”. Lumebulbs are glass balls, filled with an oil made of the lumefish scales that provide illumination during the night. The lumefish oil eventually loses its glow after about a month, and can then be drained from the ball to be used as cooking oil. The ball is then refilled with fresh lumefish oil, repeating the cycle. Resource: Lumefish While colored glass and copper jewelry are one thing, the Tumirean people have seen traders bring back gold, silver, and precious gemstones. Shiny, sparkly, and beautiful to behold, the Tumirean people desire more of these precious metals, with which to better distinguish status amongst themselves. Required Resource: Soft metals (gold, silver, etc). Faith The vast majority of the population worships the ancient gods of Tumir, the Seven-Fold Heavens. The church teaches that each of the seven gods was the creator of one of the seven original tribes. Each of the seven gods has areas of focus, and each is considered the patron of a different city (or, in the case of Jan-tiri, the Assuni people). The gods do not rule over each other. They are equals, in all things, as they have no need of hierarchy - even if the mortals who worship them do. Jan-tiri: Jan-tiri is the god of journeys and oaths. For Jan-tiri, travel is its own reward, no matter the destination or purpose. Oathbreaking is considered an offense worthy of death, in Jan-tiri’s teachings. Jan-tiri is said to have created the Assuni people, and is considered their patron. Most Assuni worship them, and they are associated with the color white. Dorkal: Dorkal is the god of metals and war. It is he who blesses miners, smiths, and soldiers. He expects soldiers to comport themselves in war with bravery and discipline, as well as moderation. Dorkal is said to have created the people who would found Dur-Bargazu, and is considered that city’s patron. His worship is largest in that city, and he is associated with the color red. Nellini: Nellini is the goddess of fishing and trade. It is she who guides the fishers to lumefish schools and who guides the traders to new ports. Her faith teaches that we must not fish too much, else there will be no fish left. Nellini is said to have created the people who would found Enkasru, and is considered that city’s patron. Her worship is most commonly found in that city, and she is associated with the color blue. Farqinu: Farqinu is the god of the night and rulership. He makes the stars and moon travel across the sky at night, and gives Kings wisdom to rule. It is said that a King who rules without wisdom is one who has been spurned by Farqinu for some flaw in their character. Farqinu is said to have created the people who would found Doran-tir, and is considered that city’s patron. His worship is most commonly found in that city, and he is associated with the color purple. Meshitar: Meshitar is the goddess of agriculture and rivers. She caused the rivers to flow and ensures the crops grow. It is said that famine is a sign of her displeasure. Meshitar’s worship is probably the widest spread of all the gods, but it is centered on Sebass-Ur. She is the patron of that city and believed to be the creator of the tribe which founded it. She is associated with the color green. Sherakhan: Sherakhan is the god of craftsmen and music. He inspires musicians to write great songs and craftsmen to create not just items but works of art. Sherakhan is considered to have created the tribe that founded the city of Pilgar, and is that city’s patron. He is associated with the color orange. Ingsha: Ingsha is the goddess of the sun and weather. She crosses the sky each day on the sun, looking upon the Tumireans, and sends the rains to water crops - or to flood if it is needed. She is believed to have created the tribe that founded Sarum, and is that city’s patron. She is associated with the color yellow. Rituals: The gods of Tumir grant miracles only when asked, and rarely to individuals. Priests of multiple gods must come together in a ritual to request a miracle. The more variety among the priests, and the more of them there are, the more powerful the miracle. Miracles exact a heavy toll on those who call upon them, however - mortal bodies can only take so much divine energy. Typically, a priest can only participate in one such ritual per year - more than that, and they are likely to fall over dead. This typically means rituals are typically saved for specific purposes, and there are almost never more than seven priests (one dedicated to each deity) involved in the ritual. Examples of frequently used rituals include one for reinforcing weapons and armor, healing severe wounds or disease, and restoring fertility to a fallow field. Other Religions: While the majority of the population follows the Seven-Fold Heavens, no religion is truly outlawed. There is a small minority who follows Perijanism, mostly among the small Avekonian population - although royal decree forbids them from building large temples. Dejanism sees little traction in the nation, as most Tumireans care little about Dejan’s ultimate fate. Kings of Tumir who fail to ask the gods’ permission to rule have short reigns - they have seen that time and again with their own kings. Followers of Jalyeong-Bo and Abhidi are unheard of; Jalyeong-Bo would likely view the Seven-Fold Heavens as incompatible with their belief in spirits, and Abhidi has never spread to Tumir. Offical Religion: The Seven-Fold Heavens (Tumirean Pantheon) Majority Religion: The Seven-Fold Heavens (Tumirean Pantheon) Minority Religion: Perijanism Initial Ruler King Giramas IV has only been on the throne for a year, having just turned 30 years old. Though he is content to govern Tumir's existing borders well, his wife, Queen-Consort Shastri, believes he should be more ambitious and expand Tumir's borders, at least as far as Sebestes III's conquests. The couple has two children - Raishi, a 5-year old daughter, and Asmurus, a 2-year old son. King Asmurus I was a distant father, leaving Giramas's education to tutors. As such, Giramas has a theoretical knowledge of how to rule, but little practical experience in doing so. The exception to this is in matters of trade. Giramas's tutor on trade, coinage, and economics, Sul-Tasit, was a highly successful merchant, and taught Giramas very thoroughly, including allowing him to make trade decisions for Sul-Tasit's own business. As such, Giramas is much more knowledgeable in matters of trade than military tactics and rulership, and has rewarded Sul-Tasit with an appointment as his trade advisor. Giramas had three sisters, all of whom have been married. Attributes: Diplomacy: 4 Military: 2 Economy: 4 + 1 = 5 Faith: 2 Intrigue: 1 + 1 = 2
  15. Oof, sorry to hear about the power outage. That can be rough. Hopefully you don't have to replace too much of what was in the fridge. Tumir would have engaged in that exploration in North Baria a couple hundred years before Dejan showed up before losing contact after the collapse of the dynasty that conducted the exploration. If that doesn't fit with North Baria's timeline, we can say they explored the area but didn't deem it worth settling for a trading post. If it does, Tumir could have founded a port settlement for trade and to act as a waypoint for travel further east that, over time, has grown larger due to other Humans settling in the area. Let me know if that sounds good, and I'll add in a little bit to my history about Tumireans settling a port there, and then losing contact with them.
  16. Sorry for the lack of response, it's been 48 hours without power over here. North Baria would definitely not be a hotbed of trade, but its 2 ports would be safe harbors on longer journeys, at least in eras when piracy was limited or nonexistent. For trade, they mainly have raw copper & copper pots etc, plus cultural goods, but in small amounts they might have anything that was recovered from wrecks or long since pirated. The Humans from North Baria can be from anywhere; wrecked ships, travelers, immigrants, those seeking to flee authority, etc. So a ship bringing settlers to make an outpost or colony would be reasonable there, as there wouldn't have been large Human settlements on the shores to dissuade them, except some pirates or bandits depending on the timing and whether Roak Island or the shoreline of the mainland. This could be the origin of one of the ports if it was pre-Dejan, or a new community if in the last century.
  17. I say go for it. And of course, the Khursani would have destroyed those wretched heretics for their improper supplications and daring to not follow the rites as prescribed in... all five cities, in no way are we heterodox, no sir!
  18. *looks at the fact that you are not far away, my country's backstory involves priests attempting some unknown ritual to their gods leading to monsters nearly destroying their civilization while at the same time having a fairly insular culture* I have half a mind to just ask if I can make the old cults in my country a sect of your national religion that had developed separately enough to be considered distinct. Granted it no longer exists in my lands due to extremely violent pogroms by the survivors around 113 years ago and there would be some differences. On the other hand my guys will be pretty hostile as is due to the whole Dejanist thing.
  19. Duria (region name: Dur) Region 71 "On Wings of Fire" Geography Duria's landscape is very varied: the north west is a swamp area unfit for settlements, to the east there is a vast fertile grassland area, to the south its impossible to miss the tall mountains and, especially, the volcano, which, from time to time, erupt, the majority of the wooded areas are located near the mountains . The climate is temperate and a bit rainy. Khompur's Mouth, the volcano, it's not just the symbol of Duria, it's almost a father figure, people settled here because of the volcano, without it Duria wouldnt exist. There are three major settlements: Erevrand the hallowed city(commonly called Erevrand): the oldest city, built at the feet of the volcano, dangerously close but so far spared, some believe this to be the proof of it's holiness, the truth is much more mundane but no less impressive, its position and construction was carefully planned. The city is the cultural center of the region (or the continent..or the entire world... depend who you ask), you'll find poets, sculptors, painters, jewelers, writers etc. etc. There is a tradition among artists of all fields and origins, to visit the hallowed city at least once in their lifetime, it is also said that those who see the volcano erupt will be greatly inspired by it, unsurprisingly the city itself is gorgeous, able to rival the great empire capital in beauty . Cacot (formerly Cacot village) a young city, in less than a decade it went from a village of a few hundred souls to a city of thousands, this thanks to new trade routes that crossed on it's position, the city is on the east side of the region, here agriculture is everything, you'll find fields and fields, then some more fields, with the occasional field in-between, the city produce and sell food, it's the largest city of Duria and also the ugliest(by their standards) a very pragmatic settlement. Aekkel town (formerly Aekkel keep): An old keep(old by Duria standards) dating back to the days of the great empire, after the fall people begun to settle near it, creating a town around the keep, it stand roughly in the middle of Duria, near the main roads, provide a safe place to stop for travelers and keep bandits away. People and Culture Almost the totality of the inhabitants are humans, Duria has a strong bond with the (old) Empire, and their culture has a lot of similarities with it, or to be precise its similar to the ideal of the great empire. Most people of Duria celebrate the old glorious days of their ancestors and try to keep that spirit alive through art, they strive to bring beauty into the world, clearly most commoners lack the time and money to dedicate themselves to art, but they often include it in their religious rituals and tend to cure appearance more than the unwashed barbarians of the nearby region(or so they think). Erevrand is a bit of a special case, given the high number of foreign visitors its quite a cosmopolitan city, every artist is welcome, human or not. There is a second race, a minority whose numbers are so low(around a dozen left) to be heading toward extinction: the Hodda, they are similar to humans but slim, athletic but never muscular, their ears are long an pointed, they dont grow facial air and have little body hairs, the Hodda have a long lifespan, estimated to be around 400 years, they dont suffer aging as much as humans do (largely inspired to dnd4 eladrins) given their low number they are quite mysterious, poorly known as a specie. History and Government Duria is a young region, born from the great empire and a quirky governor named Edja Von Barla , such was his love for the great empire that the mere thought of foreign hands building Erevrad irked him greatly, yet the need of manpower was far greater than what the empire could provide, the governor found a creative solution, he gave the opportunity to every man and woman in Dur to become citizens of the empire, what at first looked like a mere formality to please Edja's quirk ended up creating the love for the Great empire. A durian could say "your ancestors were born in the empire, mine were chosen by it" It all started 105 years ago, when the Great Empire set foot in this region, it is said that during their voyage the army witnessed a sign of the gods, the volcano erupted as they were passing by, that precise moment is what the scholars of Duria consider the birth of Duria, that sign first attracted the men of faith, then those who placed their faith in gold and lastly those who were seeking to replicate such beauty. Just a few years with the Great Empire before it fell, but those years are a precious memory for Duria, proud of being the holy land of art, back then there wasnt a statue in the imperial palace that didnt come from Duria or was made by someone who studied at Duria. Then everything ended, too quickly, too son, the empire crumbled and changed into something different, something ugly, a shadow of what it was, but not Duria, the nobles used this opportunity to seize power, they formed their own little kingdom, determined to keep the dream alive, to preserve an ember of the Great Empire, during the last hundred years Duria strived to remain the holy land of art, a precious piece of something lost, but never forgotten . But even Duria changed, growing more tolerant and flexible, this reached the apex when 60 years ago King Byton Formareg II took a Hodda as third wife, the first time in Duria(brief) history of a noble marrying an inhuman, her name is Rina El'Won and over the decades her influence grew, even after the death of her husband she remained by the side of the successors as advisor, unbeknown to anyone she advance her own plots like a good evil advisor. Duria is a monarchy, with an early feudal system, this due to decentralization, each major city self-manage under the guidance of people appointed by the king, these nobles own land and business, this because the king lacked a sufficiently strong bureaucratic system to manage everything, the end result is that Duria feel a bit shattered, a patchwork, but it works....most of the times. Economy Duria depend on imports, thats the truth, the region produce plenty of food and they are capable at working raw material, turning it into a finished product of great quality, the problem is their weak industrial strength, to put it simply they dont extract enough to satisfy their own demand, wood in particular is scarce, it's widely used but Duria doesnt have enough wooded areas to keep up with the need. For export, a true Durian would say they export beauty, it's an exaggeration but not too far off target, Duria is the patron of the arts, people come to study here, whether you are a painter, a writer or a stone carver you will find something to learn in Duria, this specialized brain farm give life to a great variety of art-works, owning a trade post in Duria doesnt merely mean owning art-works, it means having your own artists in the city, it means having their names on the most coveted creations, it means prestige(within Duria at least) Faith Duria main religion is Perijanism, the rest of the world can say whatever they want but the people of Duria remain loyal to the gods of their ancestors, it's the only religion of the region and the one recognized by the supreme authority. This doesnt mean there arent people of other faiths, plenty of foreigners come and go, as strange as it may sound you could find a Jalyeong-bo follower in Erevrand, it's just that Duria natives are resistant to change, so far no religion managed to make a breach into their hearts. Duria doesnt have a favored deity, they are born from the land but flew in the sky, passion and innovation are key elements but so is knowledge and no one better than a Durian know the wrath of nature, they see the touch of Khompur, Trodje and Rieba in their lives and thank them all for it, even if the gods themselves argue with each other. The Hodda have no religion as far as scholars can tell, they appear to follow Perijanism too (i'd like to keep this vague and mysterious, leave plenty of room to create in-game without constraints) Sole religion: Perijanism Starting king King Ulbon Formareg IV Attributes Diplomacy: 2 Military: 2 Economy: 4 Intrigue: 3 Faith: 2 Age: 46 Description: a man whose only noteworthy qualities are a cool head and an eye for talent, by himself he's not much but has capable helpers. Has 2 wives, 3 daughters and 2 sons
  20. The Holy Kingdom of Khur Region 55 Geography Khur is a fertile region, geographically centered on the great river Skai, whose headwaters lie in mountains the intensely (some might say zealously) pious locals consider it blasphemous to presume to name. The excellent agricultural land along the Skai gives way to sandier soil near the northern coast, and the northern reaches are forested, but not thickly. The Skai Delta, where it enters the sea, is noteworthy mostly for the large collection of small and undistinguished villages that dot it- there is no great port city, for the people of Khur do not often look outward, and while the villagers certainly fish on the river and in the sea, they don't stray far from the shore. Khur's five great cities- the Holy Cities, as they call them- Draxa, Kalid, Urak, Raam, and the capital of Khur-Alak- are mostly great in the sense of having once been far more important than they are now. Many ancient structures of mud brick remain standing from a time long before the region's conquest, and most new construction is carried out by cannibalizing older structures- with one exception. The stone ziggurats at the heart of each city are sacrosanct, and have recently been refurbished by artisans who made up with enthusiasm what they might be said to lack in artistry. The Great Ziggurat of Khur-Alak is an impressive sight- as is the Grand Arena being constructed in its shadow. People and Culture Long isolated by the mountains to the east and their own disinterest in seafaring to the west and north, the people of Khur (generally called the Khursani) are an insular lot, quick to detect and suspect outsiders. They are overwhelmingly human, with most other species viewed with suspicion at best, outright loathing becoming more likely the less human a given being appears. The sole exception are the dwarves of Raam, who are accorded full rights for their role in preserving the written records of the Old Gods. Habitually clean-shaven from head to toe, Khursani dwarves are decent craftsman, but not particularly inspired- most of their work consists of copying existing implements. The experience of being conquered by the Avakonian Empire was incredibly traumatic for the Khursani, who had seen themselves as the favored of the Old Gods, and turned what had once been a simple insularity into outright xenophobia. The death of Dejan was quickly seized upon as a divine miracle, wrought by the Gods to liberate Khur, and the subsequent butchery wrought upon the Avakonian colonists was incredibly brutal, and largely indiscriminate. A few pitiful remnants were enslaved instead of killed, but their numbers continue to dwindle as harsh treatment- and the fact that Khursani slaves are seen as more pleasing to the Gods- takes it toll. With the expulsion of the hated occupiers, Khur has seen a dedicated effort to revive the fashions and customs of its glory days- which truthfully had ended long before Dejan led his armies to victory over the fractious city-states of the region. Both men and women tend to wear skirts or kilts of wool, and wear their hair (generally black or brown, although the occasional blonde is seen) in braids about their shoulders. Men also braid their beards. Social status strictly dictates the length a garment is permitted to be, and the colors permitted for dye. It is a deliberately arcane and hierarchical process, and ignorance of the etiquette immediately marks an outsider. All of Khur follows the faith of the Old Gods, and the sometimes bloody rituals involved in the faith make for a populace inured to pain and hardship. Religion permeates everyday life to the extent that a priest is required for even the ceremony of signing a business contract. History and Government Long, long ago, the Great Cities of Khur were beacons of enlightenment and learning, as the people along the mighty Skai sought to explore and understand their world... the better to control it and teach those bastards int he next village what for. They developed a shared written language, even as they warred constantly with one another, and the constant hostility, and the demands of the harsh religion which sprang up in the region insured that the population was never quite what the region's agricultural potential could support. Then, the Priest-King of Draxa set out to forcibly unite the Holy Cities, claiming the Gods had given him a vision, demanding that he create a great Empire. By the standards of the day, he succeeded... until, that is, the Draxan forces were defeated in an uprising by the people Kalid, who claimed the Gods favored them. Kalid assumed the rule of the territory until in turn overthrown by a rising from the people of Raam. And so on. Dejan found the conquest of Khur to be laughably easy when he happened along centuries later, the Five Cities having essentially exhausted themselves with endless bickering and jockeying for power, their Gods evidently having grown weary of sending any sort of useful vision. In fact, it wasn't a conquest he was particularly proud of, and had the region not boasted such fertile farmland, rich flocks of sheep, and occasionally-good-looking locals, it's debatable whether he would have bothered with overseeing the campaign at all. The occupation of Khur was seen a punishment detail, as the dour, unfriendly populace seemed capable of sulking, but nothing much more exciting. This is almost certainly what allowed the uprising led by Priest (and later, Priest-King) Taran-Sha of Alak to succeed when word of Dejan's death reached Khur- the garrisons were dumping grounds for the dregs of the Avakonian Empire, and aside from a few wealthy merchants keen to exploit the agricultural resources of Khur, nobody much had bothered moving there. In short order, the bloody uprising led by Taran-Sha had driven out the few hated invaders who had managed to escape, and Alak was renamed Khur-Alak as the seat of the newly unified Holy Kingdom.A pity, then, that Taran-Sha the Liberator was called to the Gods so soon after the victory. Maybe it was something he ate. Having massacred their tyrants and driven the hated foreigners from their land, the people of Khur currently bask in the delusion that with the aid of the Gods, they had defeated the hated Avakonian Empire, redeeming their earlier conquest. Government In theory, at least, the Five Holy Cities are each led by a Priest-King, with the Priest-King of Khur-Alak as first among equals- and each village or smaller town owes its fealty to the Holy City nearest to them In practice, when the Priest-King of Khur-Alak says "jump," the others don't even ask "how high?" they simply do their best to hit the ceiling, and even the most illiterate fisherman in the most forsaken village in the Delta knows damned well that Khur-Alak is the center of their particular universe. A theocracy more tyrannical might exist somewhere, but Khur will give anyone a run for their money in that department. The priesthood is seen as the absolute highest calling, and with fierce competition for a place with the various temples, just about anybody with any combination of ambition and ability has either become part of the clergy or been bitterly disappointed. Priests lead the armies, priests oversee trade, priests handle the affairs of government, and priests handle what it pleases them to call "diplomacy." They also collect taxes, and serve as the closest thing Khur can claim to law enforcement. Economy While they will never admit it, the changes the Avakonians brought to Khursani agricultural practices were for the better, and have thus escaped the wrath of the priesthood up until now, and the nation produces far more food than they need. In addition, their flocks of Khursani Blacknose sheep produce a great deal of coarse wool. Thus, despite their general loathing of the wider world, the Khursani are something of a bread basket, exporting vast quantities of sheep and grain in exchange for stone and metal ores which their religion keeps them getting in their own mountains- the only domestic metal produced is a low-quality bronze from the mines of Raam. Resources: Sheep Required Resource: Hard metals Faith Official Religion: The Old Gods Majority Religion: The Old Gods Minority Religions: None that dare stick their heads up. The occupation was almost universally loathed, and even the benefits of the Avakonian presence were largely spurned after the uprising. Not one Dejanist shrine remains standing within Khur's borders, and any other faith hoping to cling to a toehold would do well to pretend to be honoring the Old Gods, whatever the actual root belief might be. The Old Gods are an ancient faith with a long list of ritual observances, a pantheon full of deities with harsh names, and very little interest in converting foreigners. If the Gods had wanted those people to follow them, they would have seen to it they were born in Khur. Most rituals include at least some element of sacrifice, whether that be a clay coin pressed into a priest's palm in exchange for blessing a peasant child's birth, or perhaps the life of the child itself if the harvest has been bad. Ceremonies in honor of the Old Gods tend to be energetic affairs, with participation by the laity a matter of demonstrative faith. Outsiders seldom have much reason to inquire more deeply into the religion's dogma- particularly since it seems to all boil down to "obey the priests, or suffer the consequences." The Gods themselves are a bewildering array, with at least one associated with every single aspect of life.
  21. Approved. If you and are both interested we could get a separate little thread going to discuss a possible historical connection between your peoples and gods given your very similar cultures and love of ziggurats. Approved. You mentioned that you'd prefer the country and the region both to be named Duria. This is acceptable, though it might at times get a little confusing in a similar manner to New York, New York.
  22. The Vykronan Crescent Region 5 Kingdom of Tumir (Flag Goes Here) Geography Tumir is a kingdom located in the Vykronan Crescent on the sub-continent of Regner, situated between the Ephoristes River in the South, the Kaldores River in the north, the Ortassa Sea in the east, and the southern end of the Vykronan Mountain Range. Much of the area surrounding the two rivers is farmland, while mines dot the southern parts of the mountains. Much of Tumir is fairly flat and prone to flooding from particularly heavy rains or mountain snow melt. These lands are lush in agriculture near the two rivers, with some more arid desert in the distance between them. In the west, however, it grows hilly and more rugged. Here, the more arid climate is much more pronounced, and what plant life grows here is mostly scrubgrass, grazed upon primarily by mountain goats. There are six major cities in Tumir: Dur-Bargaz is the northeastern-most city, lying in the foothills of the Vykronan Mountains. This fortified city is where the output of much of the country’s mines is concentrated before being shipped to other parts of the country. Sarum is located at the headwater of the Ephoristes River. What mines don’t feed into Dur-Bargaz feed into Sarum, and much of the region’s stone is quarried here. Pilgar is located at the mouth of the Ephoristes River, where it meets the Ortassa Sea, and is one of two port cities in Tumir. Pilgar is home to the Royal Palace, and is the center of Tumir’s glass-blowing industry. Sebass-Ur is predominantly an agricultural city, located halfway down the Kaldores River. This area is most prone to flooding, so buildings are typically built raised off the ground to minimize damage. Enkasru serves as the predominant port of Tumir, being built on the westernmost peninsula and surrounded by the Ortassa Sea. There is a thriving fishing industry in the city. The Wall of Torgamesh, built where the peninsula meets the mainland, is a massive construction that has held against every land army that has tried to conquer it. However, it can be circumvented by a sufficiently powerful naval force, as its people have learned numerous times - most recently by Dejan. Doran-Tir is the smallest of the major cities, yet also one of the most important. Standing at the midpoint of the Ephoristes River, it is here that the Great Ziggurat of Sareth-Fal stands, where kings must come upon assuming the throne to ensure their reign has the blessing of the gods. Government Tumir is a Kingdom, ruled by King Giramas IV of the Asmurid Dynasty. Giramas IV is a relatively young man in his late 20’s, who just took the throne last year. As such, he is neither beloved of nor hated by his people as they wait and see what kind of king he will be. The King is the most dominant power in Tumir, issuing decrees and laws governing the entire Kingdom, as well as setting taxes and levying soldiers. The king also appoints royal overseers for each region and city, to ensure the decrees and laws are followed. Each city also has a hereditary governor who has the ability to pass laws and decrees for their city, so long as they do not conflict with laws passed by the King. The hereditary governor is permitted to levy a small defense force for the protection of the city, if needed, but is not permitted to use them against either the king or another city. Up until the past one-hundred and fifty years, inheritance law favored male-only primogeniture. Following the reforms of King Tilbanshar I, however, the law was changed to male-preference primogeniture. While this has not yet led to Tumir having a Queen as its ruler, it has hopefully eliminated the possibility of wars of succession, should the King or a hereditary governor die without a male heir. People and Culture The Tumirean people are humans and tend to be on the shorter side, with bronzed skin, dark brown eyes, and brown to black hair. It is considered fashionable for adult males to sport full beards - the longer and more elaborately braided a beard, the higher the social class of the male. Among women, long hair takes the place of the beard, with longer and more elaborate hair signifying the same as beards. Laborers, farmers, and fishermen typically wear knee length tunics of wool with relatively simple embroidery, while craftsmen and merchants wear ankle-length wool tunics with more elaborate embroidery or even linen, if it can be afforded. The aristocracy wear brightly dyed wool and linen with elaborate embroidery. It is also not uncommon for women to wear headdresses, becoming more elaborate at higher social ranks. Jewelry is worn by both men and women, typically made of colored glass, quartz, and bronze. Gold, silver, and other precious metals are rare in Tumir, so what is mined is typically used for coinage. Precious gemstones are all but unheard of. Food in Tumir tends to vary somewhat by region, but the diet typically includes goat, sheep, fish, lentils, peas, cucumbers, dates, figs, and melons. There are also olive groves along the Kaldores River, but these are typically used to make cooking oil, making them a delicacy more commonly enjoyed by the aristocracy. Spices typically include garlic, cardamom, turmeric, and coriander. Sesame is fairly common as well, with the seeds used for many different applications. Wheat and barley are also cultivated, allowing for the baking of flatbread and the brewing of beer. Cheese is made from both sheep’s milk and goat’s milk. The people of Tumir are descended from 7 nomadic tribes which lived in the area prior to settlement - the Pilgar, the Bargaz, the Enkasru, the Doran, the Sebass, the Sarum, and the Assuni. For the majority of their settled history, there has been no unified kingdom of Tumir, and as a consequence, its people tend to be rather independent and competitive between each other. When introducing themselves, Tumireans from one of the cities or regions surrounding it will often include the name of the city they are from in their introduction. Merchants from different cities in the same market will often compete against each other directly, with their success being directly tied to the honor of their city. Past kings have attempted to channel the spirit of this competitiveness into formal sporting competitions, but nothing particularly notable has come of it. Most buildings are constructed from clay bricks, strengthened with marsh reeds in them, although particularly important buildings use stone, brought in from the quarries near Sarum. While the first the other tribes would go on to found the major cities of Tumir, the Assuni have largely kept to their nomadic ways. The Assuni typically travel with pack animals and their herds of sheep and goats between various grazing areas, usually along the same routes and to the same places they were traveling between before the idea of a united Tumir even existed. Assuni do not value precious metals or currency, often making payment for manufactured goods, services, or taxes in the form of livestock and other animal products. Whenever a Tumirean citizen feels like protesting a new tax levied by the King, they will pay tax in “the Assuni way”, giving livestock and animal products in lieu of coin or more easily portable goods. There is also a small Avakonian population, descendants of the soldiers led by the Avakonian General Typhonus when he claimed the title King of Tumir after the Dejan’s death. They are found almost exclusively among the laborers and craftsmen, and are forbidden from carrying weapons by royal decree. History Much of Tumir’s early history was passed down orally from one generation to the next, so it is just as legendary as it is historical. What the legends all generally seem to agree on is that there were seven nomadic tribes within the area, all inhabiting different areas and generally coexisting peacefully. Eventually, six of those tribes founded settlements within the area they lived, which eventually grew into six independent city-states, typically with some number of smaller settlements nearby. While the Tumirean people lack hard founding dates for the city-states, it is generally agreed that all six were established approximately 2000 years ago (around 1900 BD). The city-states would spend the next 300 years alternately trading with and fighting amongst each other, with particularly notable rivalries between Pilgar and Enkasru over orange lumefish fishing grounds, and Dur-Bargaz and Sarum over mining rights. In 1600 BD, the King of Sebass-Ur, Sebestes, marshaled his forces and succeeded in conquering the other five city-states over the course of a 20-year campaign, which ended in him crowning himself King Sebestes I of Tumir. He ruled for 7 more years before he was followed by his son, Sebestes II, who sought to conquer lands south but was rebuffed militarily. He died in battle after only 12 years, leaving his 11 year-old son to take the throne as King Cal-Basid I. The rulers of the other five city-states, sensing weakness, rebelled, and within three years, the Kingdom of Tumir was no more, leaving only the city-states in its wake. Sebestes I had not bothered with the Assuni people, nor did his son or grandson, and so the Assuni people were largely unaffected by the brief unification of Tumir. It would be 500 years before another ruler would succeed in unifying the country. Sometime around 1308 BD, the Priest-King of Doran-Tir, Sareth-Fal, commanded the construction of a Ziggurat, larger than any that had been built before, or would be built since, to be dedicated to all seven gods of the Tumirean Pantheon. It was here, he said, that the gods had told him those who would rule the Tumirean people must come to ask their permission to do so. The Ziggurat took 37 years to build, and upon its completion, Sareth-Fal called for a great celebration. During this celebration, it was noticed that he had disappeared. The next morning, his body was found lying in repose in the central chamber before the statues of the seven deities. It seemed to be smiling and at peace. To this day, no one knows how his death came about, or whether he posed himself before the gods or someone did it for him. 165 years later, the city of Dur-Bargaz were able to smelt tin and copper together to create a stronger, harder metal - bronze. The King of Dur-Bargaz, Giramas, equipped his armies with weapons and armor made of this new metal and set out to unify Tumir. First, he went to the Assuni and demanded their allegiance, which the nomads readily gave. He then conquered the city-state of Doran-Tir. Upon his conquest, he entered the Grand Ziggurat, knelt before the statues of the gods, and asked them to grant him rulership of all Tumir. He then went on to conquer all of the other city-states in the next five years, crowning himself King Giramas I in 1100 BD, later to be known as King Giramas the Great. He ruled Tumir for 37 years, expanding its borders north and south. His son, Avashili I, also went to the Great Ziggurat to ask the gods permission to rule Tumir. He reigned for 26 years, and built the first network of roads between the city-states, facilitating trade and allowing him to move his armies more quickly. He was followed by his son, Giramas II, another who journeyed to the Great Ziggurat. He ordered the copying and distribution of knowledge to all the city-states, to better educate and unify his people. Upon his death 33 years later, his son Kurnezzar I followed him on the throne. Though his 34-year reign was mostly unremarkable, it was also generally prosperous and successful. He, too, had journeyed to the Great Ziggurat upon taking the throne. 5 years into the reign of his son, Avashili II, a plague swept through Tumir, claiming not only Avashili’s life but also those of his wife, children, siblings, nieces, and nephews. Avashili II had not presented himself at the Great Ziggurat. War between the various descendants of Giramas I broke out, and within seven years, the Kingdom had collapsed yet again into city-states in 958 BD. The Assuni were, once again, relatively unaffected by the civil war and collapse of the kingdom. The Kingdom of Tumir would remain fractured for another 330 years, during which time the High Lord of Enkasru, named Torgamesh, built a great wall to defend his city-state on the peninsula from conquest by the other city-states. It was his grandson, Giramas, who would go on to conquer the other city-states in 628 BD to be crowned King Giramas III, who held his coronation ceremony in the Grand Ziggurat of Sareth-Fal, so that the gods could bear witness to his ascension and grant their permission to rule. Though his reign lasted a mere 7 more years, his son Kurnezzar II would go on to conquer all the lands along the Kaldores River in his 24 year reign. His son Cal-Basid II would go on to begin the conquest of lands south and around the coast in his 33 year reign, although the conquest would be finished by his son, Sebestes III. After his 28 year reign, his son Kurnezzar III took the throne. In his 31 year reign, Kurnezzar III had the idea to send forth boats along the coast, to explore and meet other peoples for the possibility of trade and the settling of foreign lands, which led to open trade with the city-states of the Choras River. Kurnezzar III was followed by his son, Avashili III, who, unfortunately, was vain and arrogant. He refused to present himself at the Grand Ziggurat, famously saying, “The gods should be so lucky I have become King of Tumir, for I am as they are.” He believed that by becoming King, he had placed himself on equal footing with the gods, and thus had no need to ask them to rule. This sat very poorly with both the priests and the aristocracy, and it was but 3 years later a coup was launched and he was executed in order to place his infant son, Mashda I, on the throne. However, the aristocrats who came together to form Mashda I’s regency argued amongst themselves, and eventually infighting turned to full on civil war a year later when Mashda died of fever. The Kingdom once again fractured into its various city-states, and Tumir lost control of the lands they had conquered. The Assuni remained unaffected in following their way of life. This third civil war gave rise to what is known as “the Assuni period”. Some of those who lived in the city-states, seeing how unaffected by the collapse of the Kingdom the Assuni people were, began saying that it had been a mistake to found the city-states in the first place, and left to form their own nomadic groups in emulation of the Assuni. For the next 150 years it became fairly common for those disgruntled by the fighting amongst city-states to abandon their lives and join a group of wandering nomads. Sometimes entire groups of soldiers would simply abandon their posting to do so. This became less common as, two Kingdoms rose in the region through diplomatic alliances. The first was the Kingdom of Northern Tumir, consisting of the city-states of Dur-Bargaz, Sebass-Ur, and Enkasru. The other was the Kingdom of Southern Tumir, consisting of the city-states of Sarum, Doran-Tir, and Pilgar. The Assuni traveled between the two unimpeded. These two Kingdoms would exist in an occasional state of war for the next 304 years. During this time, traders from both Kingdoms would make contact with the Avakonians. After a prolonged period of peace, King Asmurus of Southern Tumir and King Zimbir of Northern Tumir both held ambitions of uniting all of Tumir under their rule. Both were wary of prolonged conflict, however, so the two came to an agreement. They would enter the Grand Ziggurat together, and whoever the gods chose would be King of Tumir. It was a trick by Zimbir, however, who stabbed Shar-kali once they were alone in the Grand Ziggurat. He thought this would be the end of it, but the wound was not immediately fatal, and as he was announcing the gods had chosen him over Shar-Kali, the latter staggered from the Ziggurat, bleeding, and accused Zimbir of his treachery. Zimbir was killed attempting to flee, and the armies of both Southern Tumir and Northern Tumir met in the open field outside of Doran-Tir. Asmurus’s son Tilbanshar and Zimbir’s son Shal-kiri faced each other in personal combat as the battle raged around them, until a stray arrow took Shal-kiri in the throat, slaying him. The armies of Northern Tumir routed. Tilbanshar ordered the armies of Southern Tumir to hold in their pursuit, and he entered the Grand Ziggurat to ask the gods for their permission to rule. Afterwards, he led his armies to Sebass-Ur, where he demanded the surrender of the Northern Kingdom to him as punishment for both Zimbir’s treason. They capitulated, and Tilbanshar married Zimbir’s daughter to unite all of Tumir together again, becoming King Tilbanshar I. The Assuni did not partake in the fighting. Well educated on the history of the region, Tilbanshar I began a series of reforms. First he changed the laws of succession to allow for female inheritance, then he made the traditional rulers of the city-states the hereditary governors. He then established the Royal Overseers, who would ensure that the laws and decrees passed by the King were followed. He also properly codified Tumirean law, and reconquered the lands along the Kaldores River. It was in his 42nd year of reign (5 BD) that word reached Tumir of Dejan beginning his conquest. With time to prepare, Tilbanshar I marshaled his forces to defend his kingdom. Dejan arrived a year later, and it took him all of a month to conquer Tumir. Tilbanshar I and his sons were all killed. However, when Dejan’s army seized the Royal Palace in Pilgar, Tilbanshar’s 9-year old grandson, Atabesi, was nowhere to be found. He had vanished. Upon Dejan’s death, one of his Generals, Typhonus, seized control and declared himself King of Tumir. Refusing to ask “inferior” gods for permission to rule a conquered land, he defaced the Grand Ziggurat, and declared Perijanism the official religion of Tumir. What followed was a rebellion against his rule, as none of the city-states voluntarily followed him. It took him five years to finish subduing the rebellious city-states, and it was only through an iron-fisted rule of terror he was able to do so. Having finally done so, Typhonus led his armies back towards Dur-Bargaz, where he had set his government. During the journey, his weary forces were ambushed by people he had dismissed as irrelevant. The Assuni had risen up against him, and the ambush was so effective, that Typhonus’s army was quickly routed, and Typhonus himself was captured and executed by Atabesi, who had been in hiding with the Assuni. Typhonus’s death set off yet another revolution against the lesser generals who claimed succession from him, and in 6 AD, Atabesi had consolidated his rule and been crowned King Atabesi I of Tumir, to the rejoicing of his people. His first act as King was to repair the Grand Ziggurat, and when it was done, he entered and asked the gods for permission to rule. He then set about repairing the damage from Dejan’s conquest and Typhonus’s rule. Atabesi I ruled for 49 years, much of that time spent rebuilding Tumir. His son, Atabesi II, ruled for 17 and finished the rebuild. He considered expanding Tumir’s borders, but such a war was considered unpopular at the time after the violence previously, so he did not do so. He was followed by his son Asmurus I, whose 37 year reign was spent re-establishing trade with their previous trading partners. After his death just last year, his son Giramas was crowned Giramas IV, and with the permission of the gods, is prepared to set about defining his reign. Economy Tumir possesses abundant foodstuffs, but the most valuable are the different varieties of lumefish. Called such due the faint glow they give off even in daytime, lumefish can not just be eaten, their scales can also be used to make dyes for fabric or to color glass, as well as what Tumireans call “lumebulbs”. Lumebulbs are glass balls, filled with an oil made of the lumefish scales that provide illumination during the night. The lumefish oil eventually loses its glow after about a month, and can then be drained from the ball to be used as cooking oil. The ball is then refilled with fresh lumefish oil, repeating the cycle. Resource: Lumefish While colored glass and copper jewelry are one thing, the Tumirean people have seen traders bring back gold, silver, and precious gemstones. Shiny, sparkly, and beautiful to behold, the Tumirean people desire more of these precious metals, with which to better distinguish status amongst themselves. Required Resource: Soft metals (gold, silver, etc). Faith The vast majority of the population worships the ancient gods of Tumir, the Seven-Fold Heavens. The church teaches that each of the seven gods was the creator of one of the seven original tribes. Each of the seven gods has areas of focus, and each is considered the patron of a different city (or, in the case of Jan-tiri, the Assuni people). The gods do not rule over each other. They are equals, in all things, as they have no need of hierarchy - even if the mortals who worship them do. Jan-tiri: Jan-tiri is the god of journeys and oaths. For Jan-tiri, travel is its own reward, no matter the destination or purpose. Oathbreaking is considered an offense worthy of death, in Jan-tiri’s teachings. Jan-tiri is said to have created the Assuni people, and is considered their patron. Most Assuni worship them, and they are associated with the color white. Dorkal: Dorkal is the god of metals and war. It is he who blesses miners, smiths, and soldiers. He expects soldiers to comport themselves in war with bravery and discipline, as well as moderation. Dorkal is said to have created the people who would found Dur-Bargazu, and is considered that city’s patron. His worship is largest in that city, and he is associated with the color red. Nellini: Nellini is the goddess of fishing and trade. It is she who guides the fishers to lumefish schools and who guides the traders to new ports. Her faith teaches that we must not fish too much, else there will be no fish left. Nellini is said to have created the people who would found Enkasru, and is considered that city’s patron. Her worship is most commonly found in that city, and she is associated with the color blue. Farqinu: Farqinu is the god of the night and rulership. He makes the stars and moon travel across the sky at night, and gives Kings wisdom to rule. It is said that a King who rules without wisdom is one who has been spurned by Farqinu for some flaw in their character. Farqinu is said to have created the people who would found Doran-tir, and is considered that city’s patron. His worship is most commonly found in that city, and he is associated with the color purple. Meshitar: Meshitar is the goddess of agriculture and rivers. She caused the rivers to flow and ensures the crops grow. It is said that famine is a sign of her displeasure. Meshitar’s worship is probably the widest spread of all the gods, but it is centered on Sebass-Ur. She is the patron of that city and believed to be the creator of the tribe which founded it. She is associated with the color green. Sherakhan: Sherakhan is the god of craftsmen and music. He inspires musicians to write great songs and craftsmen to create not just items but works of art. Sherakhan is considered to have created the tribe that founded the city of Pilgar, and is that city’s patron. He is associated with the color orange. Ingsha: Ingsha is the goddess of the sun and weather. She crosses the sky each day on the sun, looking upon the Tumireans, and sends the rains to water crops - or to flood if it is needed. She is believed to have created the tribe that founded Sarum, and is that city’s patron. She is associated with the color yellow. Rituals: The gods of Tumir grant miracles only when asked, and rarely to individuals. Priests of multiple gods must come together in a ritual to request a miracle. The more variety among the priests, and the more of them there are, the more powerful the miracle. Miracles exact a heavy toll on those who call upon them, however - mortal bodies can only take so much divine energy. Typically, a priest can only participate in one such ritual per year - more than that, and they are likely to fall over dead. This typically means rituals are typically saved for specific purposes, and there are almost never more than seven priests (one dedicated to each deity) involved in the ritual. Examples of frequently used rituals include one for reinforcing weapons and armor, healing severe wounds or disease, and restoring fertility to a fallow field. Other Religions: While the majority of the population follows the Seven-Fold Heavens, no religion is truly outlawed. There is a small minority who follows Perijanism, mostly among the small Avekonian population - although royal decree forbids them from building large temples. Dejanism sees little traction in the nation, as most Tumireans care little about Dejan’s ultimate fate. Kings of Tumir who fail to ask the gods’ permission to rule have short reigns - they have seen that time and again with their own kings. Followers of Jalyeong-Bo and Abhidi are unheard of; Jalyeong-Bo would likely view the Seven-Fold Heavens as incompatible with their belief in spirits, and Abhidi has never spread to Tumir. Offical Religion: The Seven-Fold Heavens (Tumirean Pantheon) Majority Religion: The Seven-Fold Heavens (Tumirean Pantheon) Minority Religion: Perijanism Initial Ruler King Giramas IV has only been on the throne for a year, having just turned 30 years old. Though he is content to govern Tumir's existing borders well, his wife, Queen-Consort Shastri, believes he should be more ambitious and expand Tumir's borders, at least as far as Sebestes III's conquests. The couple has two children - Raishi, a 5-year old daughter, and Asmurus, a 2-year old son. King Asmurus I was a distant father, leaving Giramas's education to tutors. As such, Giramas has a theoretical knowledge of how to rule, but little practical experience in doing so. The exception to this is in matters of trade. Giramas's tutor on trade, coinage, and economics, Sul-Tasit, was a highly successful merchant, and taught Giramas very thoroughly, including allowing him to make trade decisions for Sul-Tasit's own business. As such, Giramas is much more knowledgeable in matters of trade than military tactics and rulership, and has rewarded Sul-Tasit with an appointment as his trade advisor. Giramas had three sisters, all of whom have been married. Attributes: Diplomacy: 4 Military: 2 Economy: 4 + 1 = 5 Faith: 2 Intrigue: 1 + 1 = 2 NOTES Okay, I think I've got everything here. Please review and let me know if this looks good.
  23.  
×
×
  • Create New...